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Adamite

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Adamite
January 13, 2009 07:58PM
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Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?

Adamite Display collections.
Zn2(AsO4)(OH)

Adamite, Mapimi, Mexico ~7cm across.©


Adamite is found in crystals as large as 8cm and Mindat lists 188 localities for the mineral as of [2010]. Everyone loves adamite and most of the good specimens come from the Ojuela mine near Mapimi, Chihuahua, Mexico. Tsumeb mavens of course think that the best adamites come from their favorite mine and can point to some impressive examples to bolster their argument. The good adamites from Tsumeb are few in number and the massive output of adamites from Mapimi in both size and quality put Mapimi first in collectors minds when they think of adamite. Adamite forms a series with olivenite which is the copper end member of the series. Adamite comes in a variety of colors from yellow, green, violet, etc. depending on what extra elements are present in its composition. The largest crystals of adamite can be as much as 7 cm but these crystals are often not well formed. Most other localities produce crystals not larger than 1 cm.


Adamite
Australia
South Australia, Puttapa, Beltana Mine

At the Beltana mine near Puttapa decent specimens of adamite have been found. Here is a description of the adamite specimens collected at the mine by Peter Elliott in an article about the mine written in the Mineralogical Record V22 p 450. “Glassy crystals of adamite to 1 cm are abundant as individuals, clusters and fan-shaped groups of subparallel crystals. Color is variable, from colorless, white and gray to pale green, yellow, orange and purple. Crystals are commonly color zoned; green, yellow or purple in the center, grading out to colorless or pale green. Crystals are usually transparent to translucent but can be opaque black or brown, due to inclusions of coranadite, or red-brown due to inclusions of hematite.”1 I should point out that the author did not mean that 1 cm crystals of adamite were common at the mine but rather that was the maximum size of the crystals found there. The pictures in the article showed pictures of green and yellow adamite crystals of 2 and 3 mm respectively. Of course we should also keep in mind that the adamites are described by a patriotic Australian and the description may be a bit rosy, especially when compared to the tons of fine adamite that have been produced from the Ojuela mine, Mapimi, Mexico.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1990, p 451.


Adamite
Chile
Atacama Region, Copiapó Province, Chañarcillo

Adamite 7.6cm wide© RPellar
3mm Adamite balls© maurizio dini

Chañarcillo is much better known for its Proustite specimens but it is also the type locality for Adamite. Specimens from this locality are rare. The original description of adamite in an 1866 french journal (Académie des Sciences, 62, pp. 692-695) by Friedel, M. C. and Daubrée, M, describes it as honey-colored. The majority of the adamite on this specimen is a dark honey brown with a little green showing in one area.
[Ron Pellar 2010]


Adamite
China
Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, Hechi Prefecture, Nandan Co., Dachang Sn-polymetallic ore field.

Adamite on limonite 5.2 cm© Edward Minerals
Adamite on limonite ~3.5 cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The specimens remind one a bit of the specimens from Mapimi, Mexico, but thus far they are rather rare creatures and the best of them could be described as plesasant but not great.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
England
Cumberland, Wantwater Mine

Adamite ~ 4 cm tall.©


This mine has produced some respectable adamites. The one pictured here is covered with pale blue green intergrown balls of crystals up to about 6 mm growing on a limonite matrix. This is an old specimen in the British Museum of Natural History and you are not likely to have a chance to get one of these. They were never abundant.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
Germany
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Wolfach, Oberwolfach, Rankach Valley, Clara Mine

Adamite FOV 4mm© Stephan Wolfsried
Adamite FOV 4mm© Stephan Wolfsried


The Clara is a famous mine and known for many other species more than adamite, but I thought these images were worth including here to give the reader a little more perspective on adamite.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Niederberg area, Wülfrath, Rohdenhaus, Rohdenhaus Quarry (incl. Krieger Quarry)

Adamite FOV 0.6 mm© Harjo


Adamite occurred in a zone encountered in the north-east face at the +190m level together with Annabergite-Erythrite group crystals for the first time in 2003. In recent years (2007-2008) yet another vein system was encountered only a couple of meters from the 2003 spot yielding many good Co-Adamite and Annabergite-Erythrite. The light pink colour is due to traces of Co and also Ni is present in the Adamite (Co-Adamite) crystals. Some of the aggregates show a green colour in the centre and a pink colour on the surface, this is probably due to the varying ratio between Ni and Co during crystallization. Adamite in Rohdenhaus also occur as colourless, yellow and green crystals, al recovered from the same zone.
[Harjo Neutkens, 2009]


Adamite
Greece
Attikí Prefecture, Lavrion (Laurion; Laurium) District, Lavrion District Mines

Adamite, 8.5 cm high© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite FOV 4 cm© Steve Rust


Adamite FOV 6mm© JM. Johannet
Adamite FOV~7mm© Steve Rust
Adamite FOV ~1cm© Steve Rust



Adamite FOV~2mm© Steve Rust
Adamite FOV ~1cm© Steve Rust
Adamite fov 4mm© Steve Rust


Adamite FOV~2.5mm© Steve Rust
Adamite 2.1cm wide© Safaa Yu


This ancient locality is famous for its multicolored smithsonite specimens but it also produces good adamite specimens though though few of them are larger than thumbnail size.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
Italy
Trentino-Alto Adige, Trento Province, Valsugana, Vignola-Falesina, Vignola Mine.

Adamite FOV ~2cm wide© Chinellato Matteo
Adamite FOV ~5mm wide© Chinellato Matteo



Adamite
Mexico
Chihuahua, Mun. de Aquiles Serdán, Santa Eulalia District.

Adamite and white aragonite, 4.5 cm across© Rob Lavinsky


Although the Ojuela mine at Mapimi, Durango has produced most of the fine adamite specimens in Mexico, some few good specimens have been produced by the mines at Santa Eulalia. These mines have probably produced more good adamites than they have been given credit for but it is likely that many of those specimens have been labeled as coming from Mapimi.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
Mexico
Durango, Mapimi, Ojuela Mine

Adamite, 9 cm across.©
Adamite ~ 8 cm across.©


Adamite on Limonite 6.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite 3.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Adamite 4.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite 4.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Adamite 3.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite on limonite 8.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The best specimens in the world of are from this mine which has been producing them for the better part of 100 years. Hundreds of fine specimens, were produced in the 1960’s along with thousands of lower quality ones. Most commonly these specimens are wheels and balls of lemon yellow crystal aggregates set off on an attractive reddish brown matrix of limonite. Individual “wheels” and “balls” are usually not over five cm in diameter but can be larger. Often the wheels and balls are so grown together that they form botryoidal looking crusts. Sometimes specimens of adamite from this mine show well formed crystals. One of the largest known adamite crystals is on a specimen in the Romero collection in the University of Arizona in Tucson. The crystal is “a purple-white roman sword crystal that is 2.7 inches.” Sometimes the adamites from Mapimi have a little cobalt in them and specimens of these crystals are reddish purple in color. Fine specimens of cobaltian adamite with large crystals tend to be better shaped than larger crystals of the lemon yellow variety. The best of these cobaltian adamite specimens can bring thousands of dollars. Some adamite specimens from Mapimi contain enough copper to make them distinctly green. Has a Mexican adamite sold for more than $5000? Yes. $100,000? I would not be surprised. In the 1960s some dealers had many flats of fine Adamites for sale but it is rare to see a fine one for sale today. An 8 cm specimen with good crystals of manganoan adamite from Mapimi, less than across brought $5100 at the Sotheby’s auction in 2000.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
Namibia
Otjiloto (Oshikoto) Region, Tsumeb

Adamite, 2 cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite & smithsonite ~ 5 cm tall.©


Adamite 4.8 cm across© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite ~4.3 cm across© Rob Lavinsky


Adamite ~ 4 cm across© Joseph A. Freilich
Adamite, 5.1 cm across© Rob Lavinsky

Adamite at this mine is uncommon but the best adamites from here are of the dark green cuprian variety which is found in crystals up to 5 cm. At Tsumeb there seems to be correlation between increasing copper content and increasingly prismatic crystals of adamite. Adamites from here come in other colors and often the crystals have color zones like those from Mapimi. “Probably the finest specimens of cuproadamite in existence were found by chance. It was on Sunday in 1986, when electrical installations were being conducted underground at the 30 level. One of the workers was trying to repair a wire in the wall. While hammering, his hammer suddenly disappeared into the wall. The young Ovambo peered after it and noticed a cavity filled with emerald-green crystals. Fortunately, no mine captain or anybody with a knowledge of minerals was in the mine that Sunday. But the Ovambo took some of the crystal groups and went to a famous mineral dealer at Tsumeb who was taking his midday nap. Both admired the luster and color of the crystals thinking they had the very much sought after mineral “diopt”, as they called dioptase in their local language. Since the dealer could not hide his excitement about the 5 cm long crystals, the Ovambo took his chance and claimed that “this mineral is very dear”. But the dealer was not put off and told him to bring out everything, even the tiniest piece. This was done with little risk due to the free day, resulting in three beer cartons of the finest cuproadamite in the world. The only associated mineral was yellow, powdery ferrilotharmeyerite (long-time unrecognized), which filled the cavities between the cuproadamite crystals. As usual at Tsumeb, the whole lot was sold within the same day and from Windhoek the specimens were dispersed world-wide…After all of the specimens were sold, it became known that this was not an exceptional find of dioptase, but the finest cuproadamite of all time.”1
The wonderful war story above was preserved for us by George Gebhard and every collector worth his salt has many of them to tell. It is this kind of story that puts the human face to mineral collecting and adds the excitement that makes collecting addictive. I thought the mineral dealer was Clive Queit but when I asked him about it he said that he thought the story was incorrect because the lady dealer in Windhoek got only a few of the specimens and he got most of them which was about a half dozen palm sized specimens in about three flats of material.
1 George Gebhard, Tsumeb, 1999 p157-9.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]

Adamite
Russia
Primorsky Kray, Dal’negorsk, Brenner Mine

Adimite 5.9 cm across.© Rob Lavinsky
Adamite, 3.4 cm across© JSS

The mines at Dal’negorsk are much better known for other kinds of specimens, like datolite, ilvaite, axinite, fluorite etc. but one of the mines did produce a few decent specimens of adamite.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]


Adamite
USA
Nevada, Nye Co., Lodi District, Quartz Mountain Camp, San Rafael Mine

Adamite FOV ~3mm wide© Wm. Wise (2006)
Adamite & Hemimorphite FOV 2mm© Wm. Wise (2006)


Adamite
USA
Utah, Tooele County, Gold Hill, Western U.S Mine

Adamite 2.7cm tall© 2008 Michael C. Roarke
Adamite 2cm tall©


Adamite 6.1 cm wide© John Sobolewski


At the Gold Hill mine respectable adamite are found. Here is a description of a 1982 collecting trip to the locality written by the mineral dealer John Seibel. “I spent several days… (at the mine). We uncovered a zone of adamites and associated minerals in gossan of the Western U.S. mine at Gold Hill. The color of the adamite ranges from lemon-yellow to lime green to sky-blue; specimens are typically bicolored. Habit is generally spherulitic or rounded growths, though a few specimens are in the form of “wheat sheaves”. Luster and color are good; spherule sizes range up to 2.5 cm, but most are under a cm. The mineralized zone is extremely dangerous due to falling rock and further collecting there is inadvisable.” The son of Forest Cureton, a well known expert on rare minerals, was killed by falling rocks in this mine during a collecting trip.
[Rock Currier, 13 January 09]



Click here to view Best Minerals A and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 102 time(s). Last edit at 04/25/2012 05:56AM by Rock Currier.
NH
Re: Adamite
March 19, 2009 01:54AM
The purple adamites from Ojuela are apparently colored by manganese, not cobalt (depsite being called "cobaltos" by the miners).

It is probably worth noting that the yellow-green adamites from Ojuela fluoresce yellow-green under LW and SW UV light. I have heard that this is due to trace uranium (presumably uranyl) content - see here, for example. The manganoan adamite I have from here does not fluoresce under LWUV; the thread linked above states that Mn can quench the fluorescence. I have no clue about fluorescence of the Cu-adamites from here.

Does adamite from other localities exhibit fluorescence as well?
avatar Re: Adamite
March 19, 2009 02:52AM
welcome to use this, if needed...best, Joe

[www.mindat.org]
avatar Re: Adamite
March 19, 2009 05:36AM
NH
May we know who you are? We should probably make a note in the article about the issues you raise, but I would like to see some hard data about those matters and not just make a note bases on speculation. Ill send Pete McGaw a note and see if he can point me to some hard data.
Rock

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Adamite
March 19, 2009 09:44AM
    
Fluorescence
[www.minsocam.org]
avatar Re: Adamite
March 19, 2009 07:58PM
    
Rock, you can copy this and paste it under the Rohdenhaus Quarry Adamite.

Adamite occurred in a zone encountered in the north-east face at the +190m level together with Annabergite-Erythrite group crystals for the first time in 2003.
In recent years (2007-2008) yet another vein system was encountered only a couple of meters from the 2003 spot yielding many good Co-Adamite and Annabergite-Erythrite.
The light pink colour is due to traces of Co and also Ni is present in the Adamite (Co-Adamite) crystals.
Some of the aggregates show a green colour in the centre and a pink colour on the surface, this is probably due to the varying ratio between Ni and Co during crystallisation.
Adamite in Rohdenhaus also occur as colourless, yellow and green crystals, al recovered from the same zone.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 03/19/2009 08:00PM by Harjo Neutkens.
avatar Re: Adamite
March 20, 2009 09:43AM
Harjo, Thats good stuff. I have put it in the article. I need to rework the adamite article to include new pictures with out the advertisements and include some stuff about manganese, cobalt and fluorescence. Not sure when Ill get to it because Im working on a little quartz project to try and find out just what we will be facing when we start to try and work on that monster.

Is all the stuff from the Rohdenhaus quarry micro material? How much of it was produced. What did the best specimen look like. (The ten questions)

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
NH
Re: Adamite
March 20, 2009 04:17PM
I will get around to registering eventually...

The reference for the manganese statement was an article linked to by David Von Bargen in this thread. Unfortunately, the link is now dead. If I recall correctly, it was a Mineralogical Record article on the Ojuela Mine. I am not a subscriber, so I can't get access to the article through their site. I don't recall if it referenced any analyses or papers.

Thanks for putting in all the time on this project!
avatar Re: Adamite
December 09, 2010 06:18PM
    
Rock,

You don't mention the type locality, Chañarcillo Chile. Here is a photo of a specimen from there. It is 7.6 x 5.6 x 4.4 cm.





Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/10/2010 07:08PM by Ronald J. Pellar.
Re: Adamite
December 09, 2010 07:30PM
Hello Ronald Pellar:

good stuff!

Chañarcillo's Adamite (at least what is know from literature) often was somewhat pinkish or more likely violet, similar to Fluorite.

Was this a Co-Adamite?

However, the foto you showed is quite an interesting piece!

To whom belongs? Private a Museum? any precise mine location where it comes from?

thanks
Maurizio Dini
Chile
Re: Adamite
December 09, 2010 08:40PM
    
"The mines at Dal’negorsk are much better known for other kinds of specimens, like daotlite, ilvaite, axinite, fluorite etc. but one of the mines did produce a few decent specimens of adamite."
Best Regards
avatar Re: Adamite
December 10, 2010 07:07PM
    
Maurizio,

The chilean adamite specimen is in my personal collection and was recently acquired. Old lables are from Robert E. Jenkins II and Brandywine. The original description of adamite in an 1866 french journal (Académie des Sciences, 62, pp. 692-695) by Friedel, M. C. and Daubrée, M, describes it as honey-colored. The majority of the adamite on this specimen is a dark honey brown with a little green showing in one area. To my knowledge, it is not a co-type specimen.
avatar Re: Adamite
December 11, 2010 03:26AM
Well Darn!
I guess Ill just have to go and add it to the best minerals article for Adamite.!

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Adamite
December 11, 2010 04:09AM
It will need to be added to the main photo galleries before it can go into Best Minerals
avatar Re: Adamite
December 11, 2010 07:58AM
Its already there. I found it and used it.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Adamite
December 11, 2010 08:05AM
Ricardo,
Jolyon told me that was the correct British spelling. You just can't trust anyone these days! >:D<Thanks.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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