Mindat Logo
bannerbannerbannerbanner
Welcome!

Ashcroftine-(Y)

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Ashcroftine-(Y)
May 26, 2009 08:15PM
©


Click here for a list of articles that are not under construction but have had at least their first drafts finished.

This article is a place holder and needs someone to take it in hand and finish the first draft. If you would like to take this article in hand, leave a reply message below or contact Rock Currier via private message by clicking on the PM button next to my name at the top of the article.



Click here to view Best Minerals A and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.


This article is in a pre-construction phase.
Someone is needed to work on this article which contains a few preliminary notes.

1. The localities need to be brought into conformity with mindat locality strings if necessary, reversed and made bold.
2. If image links appear below they need to be embedded in the article. If none are present the Mindat image bank needs to be searched for images of this mineral and the better ones and their localities need to be placed in the article.
3. The captions for the images need to be added.
4. The images need to be tweaked so that they look nice. This last bit is tedious and requires patience and some little artistry.



Ashcroftine-(Y)
K5Na5(Y,Ca)12Si28O70(OH)2(CO3)8·8H2O Tetragonal
Ashcroftine-(Y), Poudrette quarry, Mont Saint-Hilaire, Rouville Co., Québec, Canada 4cm tall© Jonathan Z. Levinger


Aschroftine-(Y) Micro and rare species collections.
K5Na5(Y,Ca)12Si28O70(OH)2(CO3)8·8H2O
Canada
Quebec, Mt. St-Hilaire. “occurs as very fine, divergent sprays, tufts and small masses of randomly oriented capillary to fibrous crystals in a very small number of cavities in the breccia zones and in some miarolitic cavities in nepheline syenite. Individual crystals are very thin (0.01 mm across), 2-20 mm long, flexible, soft and commonly bent. The luster is silky and the color is very pale violet, pale pink and white. Associated minerals are microcline, albite, aegirine, quartz, bastnäsite, lorenzenite, brookite, elpidite, leucosphenite, cordylite and narsarsukite. The fine, acicular lorenzenite occurring in the breccia cavities bears a very close resemblance to aschroftine-(Y) and the two species are sometimes intimately intergrown, making reliable sight identification nearly impossible. Lorenzenite, however, is far more common than aschroftine-(Y) and fluoresces pale yellow under short wave ultraviolet radiation. Aschroftine is not fluorescent.”1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 21, 1990, p296-7.

Aschroftine
Greenland
Narsarsuk. When Sam Gordon collected at Narsarsuk in 1923 he reported discovering specimens of kalithomsonite which was later found not to be a variety of thomsonite but rather a new mineral and it was given the name aschroftine. “The mineral is vinaceous-pink in color; probably due to the 0.85% MnO present. It occurred as a more or less incoherent mass of acicular crystals, rarely measuring more than 4 mm in length, and 0.25 mm in thickness, although usually much smaller.”1 At Narsarsuk it is associated with calcite, elpidite, albite, graphite etc.
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 5, 122, p122.



Click here to view Best Minerals A and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 4 time(s). Last edit at 12/27/2012 08:11AM by Rock Currier.
Author:

Your Email:


Subject:


Attachments:
  • Valid attachments: jpg, gif, png, pdf
  • No file can be larger than 1000 KB
  • 3 more file(s) can be attached to this message

Spam prevention:
Please, enter the code that you see below in the input field. This is for blocking bots that try to post this form automatically. If the code is hard to read, then just try to guess it right. If you enter the wrong code, a new image is created and you get another chance to enter it right.
CAPTCHA
Message:

Mineral and/or Locality  
Search Google  
Copyright © Jolyon Ralph and Ida Chau 1993-2014. Site Map. Locality, mineral & photograph data are the copyright of the individuals who submitted them. Site hosted & developed by Jolyon Ralph. Mindat.org is an online information resource dedicated to providing free mineralogical information to all. Mindat relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters. Mindat does not offer minerals for sale. If you would like to add information to improve the quality of our database, then click here to register.
Current server date and time: April 20, 2014 08:37:04
Mineral and Locality Search
Mineral:
and/or Locality:
Options
Fade toolbar when not in focusFix toolbar to bottom of page
Hide Social Media Links
Slideshow frame delay seconds