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Datolite

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Datolite
September 19, 2009 06:40AM
Click here to view Best Minerals D and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.


Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities? After each set of pictures there should be some descriptive text. If none appears it means that we need someone to tell us about the specimens from that locality and something about the geology of the occurrence.



Datolite
CaB[OH|SiO4] monoclinic

Datolite, Bor Pit , Dal'negorsk Primorskiy Kray, Russia, 8.5cm tall© Roger Lang 2003


Datolite specimen are commonly found in amygdaloidal cavities in diabase and basalt. It has been found abundantly in a wollastonite skarn deposit in Dalnegorsk, Russia and these specimens are currently available in substantial quantities and the Datolite specimens from this locality are arguably the best from any locality and occur in a substantial variety of crystal forms, colors and sizes. There are many good localities for daotlite specimens and the specimens described in the following localities is by no means exhaustive and will certainly be added to as good images from other localities become available. For yeas we Americans thought that we had a lock on the best and largest Datolite crystals but that was false pride because we knew nothing about the Datolites from Dalnegorsk. The Handbook of Minerals lists the largest know crystal as 12 cm but does not say where it came from but chances are that it came from Dalnegorsk and that larger crystals that that have been produced. Mindat currently lists a 404 localities for Datolite.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Datolite
Australia
Tasmania, Rosebery district, Colebrook Hill, Colebrook Hill Mine

Datolite, FOV 3cm© R. Bottrill 2006


Datolite occurs in the Colebrook Hill mine, near Rosebery, as pale yellow-green to colourless crystals up to 20 mm across and also as crystalline masses associated with calcite, danburite, tremolite-actinolite, ferro-axinite and sulfide minerals (Bottrill and Baker, 2008: Manchester and Bottrill, in prep.). It is a late-stage mineral in the cavities in the axinite-rich skarn. It is seldom collected as it looks like quartz (which also occurs in the skarn), but I have seen some excellent specimens, perhaps worth up to $500 if they ever got on the market. The deposit is a well known Dana location for excellent axinite-(Fe). It was originally developed as a copper mine, with several open stopes and underground workings over a square km or so, but only operated briefly. It was since open by open cut and has been blasted for specimens, and there is a bit of material available still. The site is relatively inaccessible now though, a days trip through muddy, snake and leech infested, deep rainforest up a steep mountain; my last couple visits have lost half the party en route, and I have trouble getting anyone to come now. Uwe Kolitsch made though.
[Ralph Bottrill, 2008]


Datolite
Austria
Salzburg, Hohe Tauern Mts, Obersulzbach valley, Bleidächer

Datolite on Quartz, 10cm wide©



Datolite
Canada
Ontario, Hastings Co., Bancroft District, Faraday Township, Faraday Hill

Datolite,~3.5cm wide©
Datolite,~7.5cm wide©


Datolite, ~12.5cm wide©


This locality is listed in several mineralogy texts as producing fine crystals of Datolite, and you can see from the above images that they were correct.


Datolite
Italy
Piedmont, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola Province, Baveno,

Datolite, ~4.5cm wide©
Datolite on Microcline, ~6cm wide©

A classical old locality better know for its feldspars (Baveno twins) but it also produces specimens of other minerals like Datolite, Fluorite & Babingtonite. I don't think the datolite specimens get much better than the two pictured above.


Datolite
Mexico
San Luis Potosí, Mun. de Charcas, Charcas

Datolite, ~6cm wide©
Datolite on Chalcopyrite, ~7cm wide©


Datolite, Pyrite & Chalcopyrite, ~6cm wide©
Datolite,~5cm wide ©


Datolite, 3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Datolite, 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite & Danburite, 8.1cm© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite 9.3cm© Rob Lavinsky

The base metal mine at Charcas is better know for its Danburite crystals but from time to time it produce fine specimens of danburite. The Datolite specimens from this locality are never abundant and good specimens from this locality are never sold cheaply. Sometimes these specimens are associated with little crystals of sulfide minerals like Chalcopyrite that make them particularly appealing to collectors.


Datolite
Norway
More og Romsdal, Norddal, Tafjord, Tafjord tunnel

The occurence of Datolite and other minerals in the Tafjord tunnel were first described in an article in NAGS-nytt (previous name of the Nordic magazin "Stein" ) in oct/dec. 1981. ( Knut Eldjarn, "Mineraler fra Tafjord-tunnelen", NAGS-nytt oct-dec 1981). The rocks in the region are old, deep-seated metamorphic rocks which locally host veins and cavities of minerals formed at a later stage. During tunneling to make a new road from Fjøre to Tafjord a system of veins and cavities were encountered about 1 km from the western entrance in november 1980. Veins and druses up to 30-40 cm contained large quartz crystals and crystals of feldspar (microcline/orthoclase) and later formed crystals of apophyllite and calcite. Scattered crystals and fragments of a yellow and glassy mineral were also found by one of the workers and later shown to mineral collectors from the nearby city of Ålesund and one specimen was shown to me in december 1980by a visiting collector from the area. Local collectors visited the tunnel in june 1981 and saved more material including also yellow crystals of datolite. I visited the locality later in the summer before writing the article about the locality and also collected a few specimens including one good 2 cm twinned crystal of datolite and excellent calcite crystals with inclusions of julgoldite etc. The following minerals were (visually) identified in situ and on specimens in mineral collections in Ålesund at the time: quartz crystals to near 1/2 m, orthoclase/microcline crystals to 10 cm, chlorite-group, calcite crystals to 5 cm in at least 2 generations - the last of these sometimes hosting inclusions of small flattened crystals of julgoldite(see: [www.mindat.org]), apatite was rarely seen in greenish-white crystals to 3 cm, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, apophyllite in platy, white crystals to 5 cm, hematite, laumontite, babingtonite in crystals to 2 mm and datolite in mostly single, yellow crystals and fragments of large crystals to 15 cm. Most of the datolite crystals were found loose, but a few matrix specimens were saved. The datolite crystals were unusual in being both large and very glassy and partly transparent with a nice yellow colour. Some of the fragments were faceted. No more than 30-40 crystals and larger fragments of datolite and a small number of matrix specimens of datolite were saved and some can be seen in museums and private collections in Norway.
[Knut Eldjarn 2009]


Datolite
Russia
Far-Eastern Region, Primorskiy Kray, Dal'negorsk (Dalnegorsk; Tjetjuche; Tetjuche), Bor Pit

Datolite, 6cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
Datolite, 7cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Datolite, 4.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite, 12cm wide© Jorge M. Alves
Datolite, 5.5cm wide© fabreminerals.com


Datolite, 5.7cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Datolite & Quartz, 9.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite, 4.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite & Quartz, 6.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 10.5cm wide© finestminerals


Datolite, 7cm wide© Roger Lang 2003
Datolite, 4.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite, 3.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 16.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich, LLC


Datolite, 8.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite & Quartz, 6.7cm wide© Eric Graff


Datolite & Quartz, 11.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 15.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

During the cold war, Russia developed a fortress economy and if they could not find deposits of minerals within their own borders that were economically competitive with deposits in other parts of the world, they made do with what they had. A prime example of this is the big open pit boron mine adjacent to the little down of Dalnegorsk only a few kilometers east of the sea of Japan. Though it was not competitive with the borate mines in the western world, it was the best the Russians could find. The deposit is a boron rich skarn, and the main boron mineral of interest is Datolite and a large mill and borate production facility was built and operated for years to process the Datolite from this deposit. Borate producers in the west would never dream of trying to produce borate products from such an impoverished source because they had available large deposits of calcium and sodium borates available to mine. But the Russians like the Americans found that during wartime when you don't have a competitive resource within your own borders you do what ever it takes to get the job done, and they got it done. In Dalnegorsk you can walk from the edge of town directly onto the benches of the big Datolite mine and as you walk the benches you can see many open pockets (the good specimens long gone of curse) and speculate on how many thousands of flats of specimens the mine has produced. What percentage of the good specimen (undoubtedly very high) were lost during routine blasting in the mine and dumped into the crushers. You can see from the images above the considerable variety of crystal forms and colors available in specimens from the mine. The mine now operates at a very low level if at all, and I am sure that if you look on a Google earth satellite map you can see the mine. It is likely to be a good place to collect daotlite crystals into the foreseeable future. On the other side of the valley above the town is a little pit known as the Danburite mine. Here Danburite was mines for a short time in hope of also extracting borate chemicals. This was not successful but it did produce some of the largest known Danburite crystals, some associated with little hexagonal looking tabular white Datolite crystals. There are a number of base metal mines also located in this large regional skarn that produce beautiful specimens of ilvaite, galena, calcite, pyrrhotite and a number of others, but these mines have nothing to do with the Boron mines other than their close proximity in the same regional skarn.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Datolite
South Africa
Northern Cape Province, Kalahari manganese fields, Hotazel, Wessels Mine (Wessel's Mine

Datolite, 5.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, 4.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite, 3.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite & Xonotlite, 6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Good datolite specimens from this locality are scarce and always find a ready home with collectors.


Datolite
Spain
Basque Country, Vizcaya, Errigoiti

Datolite, 5.2cm wide© JRGL
Datolite, 9.6cm wide© fabreminerals.com


Datolite
Switzerland
Wallis (Valais), Les Bagnes Valley, Sembrancher, Le Catogne Mt., East slope

Datolite & Calcite, 5.2cm wide© Christian Bracke



Datolite
USA
Connecticut, Hartford Co., East Granby, Roncari quarry (Tilcon quarry)

Datolite & Apophyllite, ~20cm wide©
Datolite & Apophyllite, ~20 cm wide©


Datolite on Prehnite ~9cm tall©
Datolite on Prehnite, ~5cm wide©


Datolite & hematite?~12.5cm wide©



Prehnite ~7cm tall©
Datolite on Prehnite, ~7cm wide©
Datolite on ?, ~6.5cm wide©


Datolite, ~8cm wide©
Datolite & Quartz, ~8cm wide©


Datolite & Quartz, ~5 cm wide©
Datolite & Quartz, ~5cm tall©


Datolite on Quartz, ~5cm wide©
Datolite & Quartz, ~9cm wide©


Datolite & Calcite, ~15cm wide©
Datolite, ~6cm wide©

This trap rock quarry is perhaps a little better known for its prehnite specimens, but it has produced many good specimens of Datolite, many associated with prismatic quartz crystals and prehnite. The specimens from this mine are not as abundant as the Datolites from Paterson, New Jersey, probably mostly because less collecting was permitted there over the the years than at Paterson. One quarry worker/collector I knew had a large display of specimens from this quarry, at least half of them were datolite specimens, and part of a basement full of more specimens from the quarry. Several thousand specimens at least.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Datolite
USA
Massachusetts, Hampden Co., Westfield, Hampden quarry

Datolite, 4.4cm wide© fabreminerals.com



Datolite
USA
Massachusetts, Hampden Co., Westfield, Lane & Sons Traprock quarries

Datolite & Apophyllite, ~8cm wide©



Datolite
USA
Michigan, Houghton, Keweenaw & Ontonagon Counties (various mines)

Datolite, Delaware Mine 5.5cm wide©
Datolite Quincy mine, 7cm wide© Kristalle and Crys


Datolite & Cu, Centennial mine,1.5cm© Paul T. Brandes
Datolite Quincy mine, 4.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite, Quincy mine ~2.2cm wide©
Datolite, Delaware mine3cm wide©


Datolite, Drexel Mine 4cm wide© Paul T. Brandes
Datolite, Delaware mine3.5cm wide©


Datolite, Centennial mine 6.7 tall© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite, Medora mine 3.2cm wide© C. Stefano '09


Datolite, Delaware mine 5cm wide©
Datolite, Phoenix mine 2.5cm wide© Paul T. Brandes


Datolite, Caledonia mine 5.0cm© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite Flintsteel mine, 3cm wide© Paul T. Brandes


Datolite, Caledonia mine 5.5cm wide© Paul T. Brandes
Datolite, ~7cm wide©


Datolite on Prehnite, ~8cm wide©


The nodules of massive Datolite from the copper mines of the Keweenaw Peninsula may be unique and though they rarely exceed 12 cm, the beautiful colors and patterns that these Datolite nodules display when cut and polished often make very attractive specimens. They are so attractive that some collectors make fine collection out of nothing else. After looking at these beauties I think I need to get a few more for my collection.
{Rock Currier 2009]


Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Hudson Co., Bergen Hill

Datolite 15cm wide©


At one time in the late 19th and early 20th century, Datolite specimens from this locality were all the rage. Since that time this classic locality has been eclipsed many time by specimen from new and better localities. After viewing the Datolite specimens above from Dalnegorsk, Russia I don't have any urge to go out and get one of these for my collection.
[Rock Currier 3009]


Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Passaic Co., Haledon, Braen Quarry (Braen Stone Industry Quarry; Sam Braen Quarry)

Datolite, 6cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts
Datolite & chlorite, ~15cm wide© EAS 2007


Datolite, 5.7cm© Rob Lavinsky
Datolite after anhydrite, 8.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Passiac Co., Little Falls Township, Great Notch

Datolite on Calcite, ~7cm wide©



Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson

Datolite, 8.3cm tall© fabreminerals.com
Datolite, 6.3cm© Collectors Edge


Datolite, 5.5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Datolite & Calcite, 5cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts


Datolite & Calcite, 3.1cm© Frank A. Imbriacco III
Datolite & Pectolite, 4.2cm wide© fabreminerals.com


Datolite, ~10cm tall©
Datolite, ~3.5cm wide©


Datolite & Prehnite, ~6cm wide©
Datolite, ~11 cm wide©


Datolite & Calcite, ~5cm wide©
Datolite & Prehnite, ~11cm wide©


Datolite, 5.4cm wide© fabreminerals.com


Paterson is generally better know for its Prehnite than for its Datolite specimens. But Datolite specimens are abundant in the amygdaloids in the basalts at this locality. Some of them are surprisingly good but shrink considerably when viewed against the Datolite specimens from Dalnegorsk, Russia, For several generations this quarry has produced thousands of Datolite specimens but the quarry is pretty small compared to the Datolite mine at Dalnegorsk. In my youth I was able to collect good specimens of datolite and prehnite when ever I could wangle permission to collect in the quarry. Hundreds of collectors over the years have collected here and no few mineral dealers have cut their teeth with specimens from this quarry. On a good afternoon I have heard the old timers saying that they could drive a pick up truck into the quarry and in a few hours load it up with Prehnite specimens.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson, Upper New Street Quarry (Burger's Quarry)

Datolite & Chabazite, ~9cm wide©



Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Somerset Co., Bernards Township, Millington Quarry (Morris County Crushed Stone Co. Quarry; Tilcon Quarry)

Datolite & Pectolite©
Datolite, 10cm wide© EAS 2008


Datolite
USA
New Jersey, Somerset Co., Watchung, Fanwood Quarry (Fanwood Stone Crushing and Quarry Co. Quarry; Fanwood Crushed Stone Co. Quarry; Scotch Plains Quarry; Weldon Quarry)

Datolite & Calcite, 9.6cm wide© Frank A. Imbriacco III



Datolite
USA
Texas, Uvalde Co., Knippa, Knippa quarry (Whites mines; Texas Traprock quarries; Traprock Hill)

Datolite "crystal ball", 1.8mm on Calcite© D. Saathoff



Datolite
USA
Washington, Skamania Co., Lewis River

Datolite, ~7.5cm tall©



Click here to view Best Minerals D and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 37 time(s). Last edit at 07/26/2010 06:28AM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Datolite
September 20, 2009 03:58PM
ru    
Dear Rock,
Dal'negorsk and Bor quarry here is the same place. Bor quarry is located on vicinity of Dal'negorsk city. And it isn't connected with other Dal'negorsk localities with polymetallic ores (Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag) - Sovetskii I and II mines, Nikolaevskii mine etc.
Kind regards,
Pavel
avatar Re: Datolite
September 23, 2009 02:28AM
Thanks Pavel,
Can you tell me if datolite has been found at any other locality around Dal'negorsk other than the Bor pit? Just walking around on the benches in the Bor pit made me wish I could be there to do the same after every blast. What a juicy place to collect minerals. What about the axinite specimens and the Ilvaite. Do they also show up in the Bor pit? At other places too? Is the list of minerals found in the Bor pit more or less complete?

The Datolite find in Norway was a rather large pocket/fissure.
One tunnel worker saved one flat with crystals 2/10 cm, most on the smaller side.
Many of them were facetted. Only a handful good crystals exist.
There were also calcite crystals to 7 cm (w Julgoldite inclusions, P Lyckberg collection)

Obviously there could have been more crystals saved, but we are lucky we saw any at all.
Peter Lyckberg

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/23/2009 09:17AM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Datolite
September 23, 2009 02:25PM
ru    
I am know only colourless to white tabular datolite xls from the Danburite mine (on opposite slope of valley from Bor mine) from the region.

Pavel, what can you tell me about the Danburite mine. Is it an underground mine or an open pit? Did all the big danburite crystals come from there? What was the mine for? They were not looking for danburite were they? I have a cluster of big danburite crystals from there with those strange tabular datolites on them.

Apparently all Dalnegorsk marine Do you mean green and blue green color? coloured datolites on market come from the single Bor quarry (which is quite large).

What about mineral list [www.mindat.org] - it is almost complete. Only minor telluride and selenide phases are absen in the listt. But all they were described from the unique and single native bismuth nugget ~12 cm size, which was found in the beginning of 90th on the quarry.
Do you mean beginning in the 1990s?

What about ilvaite it is common mineral (sometimes rock-forming in skarns) in the region, but the best crystalline material is still connected with Bor Danburite quarries.

You mention a danburite mine above on the other side of the valley from the Bor pit. Here you talk about danburite quarries. How many of them were there? Did they all produce big danburite crystals? Were they actually trying to mine danburite for its boron content?

Unfortunately ilvaite was more abundant on upper levels of mines and now it is scarce.

Eugenii Galuskin told me about 5-12 cm well formed translucent datolite xls from Taskhayakhtakh range in quality confirming the best traditions of Dalnegorsk. But these B localities of Polar Yakutia are so remote and long time abandoned, that nobody saw/have specimens from here.

What do you mean by B localities? When you talk about magnetite octahedrons 50 cm on edge, I would think that these were not free standing crystal? but rather enclosed in some other rock?

By the way, Eugenii saw here magnetite octahedrons up to 50 cm in edge.::o



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/23/2009 08:32PM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Datolite
September 23, 2009 08:33PM
I am know only colourless to white tabular datolite xls from the Danburite mine (on opposite slope of valley from Bor mine) from the region.

Pavel, what can you tell me about the Danburite mine. Is it an underground mine or an open pit? Did all the big danburite crystals come from there? What was the mine for? They were not looking for danburite were they? I have a cluster of big danburite crystals from there with those strange tabular datolites on them.

Apparently all Dalnegorsk marine Do you mean green and blue green color? coloured datolites on market come from the single Bor quarry (which is quite large).

What about mineral list [www.mindat.org] - it is almost complete. Only minor telluride and selenide phases are absen in the listt. But all they were described from the unique and single native bismuth nugget ~12 cm size, which was found in the beginning of 90th on the quarry.
Do you mean beginning in the 1990s?

What about ilvaite it is common mineral (sometimes rock-forming in skarns) in the region, but the best crystalline material is still connected with Bor Danburite quarries.

You mention a danburite mine above on the other side of the valley from the Bor pit. Here you talk about danburite quarries. How many of them were there? Did they all produce big danburite crystals? Were they actually trying to mine danburite for its boron content?

Unfortunately ilvaite was more abundant on upper levels of mines and now it is scarce.

Eugenii Galuskin told me about 5-12 cm well formed translucent datolite xls from Taskhayakhtakh range in quality confirming the best traditions of Dalnegorsk. But these B localities of Polar Yakutia are so remote and long time abandoned, that nobody saw/have specimens from here.

What do you mean by B localities? When you talk about magnetite octahedrons 50 cm on edge, I would think that these were not free standing crystal? but rather enclosed in some other rock?

By the way, Eugenii saw here magnetite octahedrons up to 50 cm in edge.::o

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Datolite
September 23, 2009 10:13PM
ru    
Danburite quarry was mined exactly for danburite - it was the second danburite deposit in USSR (another was Ak-Arkhar in Tadzhikistan). The quarry is small - about 1/20 or less from Bor quarry. I had 20x8x6.6 cm anburite xls from the locality.
Datolite (which I mentioned) form here 1.5-2x0.3 cm colourless transparent plates in vugs of granular calcite-quartz-danburite rock.

Yes, large ~isometric MARINE-blue and -green xls from vugs of wollastonite-datolite scarn.

Yes, 1992-1994. Article of S.F. Malinko e.a was published in Zapiski RMO.

Only one small quarry was mined for danburite concentrate for boron extraction. Up to now local collectors dig danburite for collections and for cuting.

B localities are many small but very rich localities connected with magnesial skarns - [www.mindat.org]. Titovskoe is the largest from them. But here also calcian skarns are known with danburite and magnetite xls in calcite weins with holes full of xls - datolite, pink diopside, calcite, prehnite etc., etc., etc... Crystaline crusts of magnetite rimed these calcite veins. So magnetite was covered by calcite. But calcite matrix isn't a problem... Problem are size and weight of magnetite specimens. ;)
avatar Re: Datolite
September 27, 2009 03:38PM
us    
In the UP
Ontonagon Co.
Bumblebee mine - pale lavender nodules 2-3cm
Flintsteel - nodules to 25cm

Keweenaw Co,
Delaware mine - one of the better known mines for good datolite
Keweenaw Point (in Lake Superior) - good yellow nodules
Isle Royale - Good datolites (in Lake Superior) - collecting is now illegal

Houghton Co.
Mesnard mine - pink, yellow orange, red nodules
Centennial - nodules to 12" and 22 pounds

Crystals -
Osceola mine to 5cm
North cliff mine - veins of datolite
Jacobs creek - crystals to 1.5cm



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/14/2010 05:45PM by David Von Bargen.
avatar Re: Datolite
September 28, 2009 10:14AM
Thanks Dave. When I get around to writing the article, Ill include those.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Datolite
October 02, 2009 06:57AM
Hi rock
I added a paragraph on Tasmanian datolite to your article - hope its Ok.

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Datolite
October 02, 2009 11:12PM
Ralph, why stop there? Why don't you do the whole article? Thats OK, I understand. I hope to get to it next after I finish the Anglesite article. What is that locality. I think you wrote a bit about it on another article. It is a mine? Underground? Surface diggings? I think the place is much better know for its Axinites, right? You might talk about all of those things a bit in your blurb. We need about 500 more guys just like you.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Datolite
October 03, 2009 04:13AM
Good point Rock, I've expanded it a bit now. I prefer to write about places I know, but will look and see what else I can add.
And if everyone took up one mineral or mining area it would all be done in a week, but I guess many of us worry whether we know enough, or have enough time. Unfortunately most of us have not seen so many minerals or so much of the world as you (or can remember it all ).

Regards,
Ralph



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/03/2009 04:35AM by Ralph Bottrill.
avatar Re: Datolite, Norway
October 07, 2009 12:04AM
Rock, you ask about the details of the spectacular find of datolite in the Tafjord tunnel of Western Norway.

The occurence of Datolite and other mineral in the Tafjord tunnel was first described in an article in NAGS-nytt (previous name of the Nordic magazin "Stein" ) in oct/dec. 1981. ( Knut Eldjarn, "Mineraler fra Tafjord-tunnelen", NAGS-nytt oct-dec 1981). The rocks in the region are old, deep-seated metamorphic rocks which locally host veins and cavities of minerals formed at a later stage. During tunneling to make a new road from Fjøre to Tafjord a system of veins and cavities were encountered about 1 km from the western entrance in november 1980. Veins and druses up to 30-40 cm contained large quartz crystals and crystals of feldspar (microcline/orthoclase) and later formed crystals of apophyllite and calcite. Scattered crystals and fragments of a yellow and glassy mineral were also found by one of the workers and later shown to mineral collectors from the nearby city of Ålesund and one specimen was shown to me in december 1980by a visiting collector from the area. Local collectors visited the tunnel in june 1981 and saved more material including also yellow crystals of datolite. I visited the locality later in the summer before writing the article about the locality and also collected a few specimens including one good 2 cm twinned crystal of datolite and excellent calcite crystals with inclusions of julgoldite etc. The following minerals were (visually) identified in situ and on specimens in mineral collections in Ålesund at the time: quartz crystals to near 1/2 m, orthoclase/microcline crystals to 10 cm, chlorite-group, calcite crystals to 5 cm in at least 2 generations - the last of these sometimes hosting inclusions of small flattened crystals of julgoldite(see: [www.mindat.org]), apatite was rarely seen in greenish-white crystals to 3 cm, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, apophyllite in platy, white crystals to 5 cm, hematite, laumontite, babingtonite in crystals to 2 mm and datolite in mostly single, yellow crystals and fragments of large crystals to 15 cm. Most of the datolite crystals were found loose, but a few matrix specimens were saved. The datolite crystals were unusual in being both large and very glassy and partly transparent with a nice yellow colour. Some of the fragments were faceted. No more than 30-40 crystals and larger fragments of datolite and a small number of matrix specimens of datolite were saved and some can be seen in museums and private collections in Norway.
Knut Eldjarn

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Datolite
November 21, 2009 07:52AM
The first draft on the Best Minerals article on Datolite has been completed.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Datolite
January 07, 2010 03:33AM
Great article, Rock!!

David, I saw your earlier posting listing several of the mines in Upper Michigan; are those specimens you need photos for the article? If so, I have specimens from most of those locales that all I have to do is photograph and they could be used here. Let me know....
avatar Re: Datolite
January 09, 2010 08:33AM
Dave,

If you think you have specimens whose images would improve on what we have, I am fairly certain that many of them would eventually find a home her in the article, but I don't guarantee to use them, I would want to see them first. We would need them uploaded to mindat officially and not just sent as an attachment to a bulletin board posting like this one or as an email attachment. Just as important, actually more important in the long run will be someone to tell us about the specimens from a particular locality and something of the history of the place. See the ten things we would like to know about in the introduction to best minerals. If you think you can help fill in the text information area that should be below each set of pictures, I would be particularly pleased. Please site references also if you have them. If you have experience and knowledge about some of the localities listed above, just write up what you know in a reply and leave it here in this thread and it will be incorporated into the article. Hopefully at some point, you might work up enough nerve to pick out a mineral that you like and write a Best Minerals article about it yourself following the guidelines that we are using for this project as exampled above.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
???
Re: Datolite
February 18, 2010 02:11PM
I am trying to find a man by the name of David Johnson who posted some pictures on here of datolite. He has part of my grandfathers datolite collection and would like to get in touch with him can you help me?
avatar Re: Datolite
February 19, 2010 08:34PM
???

No I won't help you. The reason is that I don't know who you are or who your grandfather is. If you would care to register on Mindat in a normal fashion using your real name, than I will reconsider about helping you.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Datolite
March 03, 2010 10:38PM
There is an interesting datolite locality in an andesite quarry in Japan: the Makinokawa quarry on Shikoku island, with botryoidal pink datolite lining vugs up to about 10cm wide. Well-known material among Japanese collectors, and I expected there would be a photo here on Mindat to point to, but to my horror I notice we don't have the datolite nor even the locality listed at all. Another thing to add to the to-do list.
avatar Re: Datolite
March 04, 2010 07:50AM
Alfredo, Thanks for the heads up. Yes another thing to do. I am currently working trying to finish the scanning of my specimen images. Am working on the S minerals currently but hope that in a week or so, I may be able to start photo shopping them all for upload to mindat. Once that is complete, I can get back to work on best minerals, which I have been neglecting for some time.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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