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Galena

Posted by David Von Bargen  
avatar Galena
June 13, 2009 03:47PM
    
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Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?


Galena
PbS Cubic

Joplin Field, Tri-State District, Jasper Co., Missouri, USA 14cm© John H. Betts


Galena is the most important ore of lead, is often associated with silver minerals, and has been mined for at least 2000 years. It is found in hydrothermal veins and Mississippi Valley type deposits (MVT). Galena is a rare mineral in some granitic pegmatites. It is also found in the contact metamorphic skarn deposits. Most specimens are collected in active mines since it is an ore mineral and the good cubic cleavage makes recovering undamaged crystals from waste rock piles difficult.

The common crystal forms are the cube, octahedron and dodecahedron. About another 40 different forms are rarely encountered. Twinning is most common on {111} - spinel twins, which tend to form large platy crystals. Skeletal and hopper crystals are rare as are etched crystals. Crystals less than 5cm are commonly available from many localities.

Galena is an opaque mineral that comes in a blue gray color. The crystal faces can be shiny or dull (there may be some surface oxidation to anglesite or cerussite). Some of these altered crystals have an attractive white coating of alteration products. Rarely, you can get an iridescent coating on the crystals.


Galena
Australia
New South Wales,
Zeehan district, Broken Hill


Galena xtls to 40mm © Rob Lavinsky


Galena, 4cm wide © Greg Murray


Good galena crystals are very rare in Broken Hill, but some late stage crystalline to colloform formations intergrown with spahalerite were found in places.


Galena
Australia
Tasmania,
Zeehan district, North Dundas, Renison Bell Tin Mine


Galena xtls to 30mm with Quartz and Siderite, 26cm wide ©


Vughs with well formed Galena xtls to 30mm with Quartz and Siderite crystals were found in late stage veins cutting the tin orebodies about 15 years ago in a drive on the 1447m R.L Waratah Orebody, Renison Bell Tin Mine.

Galena
Australia
Western Australia,
Fitzroy Crossing, Derby-West Kimberley Shire, Cadjebut Mine


Cubic crystals of galena and minor botryoidal marcasite on dolomite? matrix, 90cm wide © R. Bottrill


Some very good specimens have been found in this mine.


Galena
Australia
Western Australia,
Northampton district, Northampton ? Mine


Some of Australias best galena specimens were found here.



Galena
Austria
Carinthia, Gailtaler Alpen & Karnische Alpen Mts, Bleiberg District

Galena on Barite 5cm wide© Peter Haas
Galena, Sphalerite 10cm wide © Rudo

Galena and sphalerite were deposited in the karstic Wetterstein limestone, similar to the Mississippi Valley type ores. Although lead mining started more than 2000 years ago, the first written record about lead mining dates to 1333 and the last mine closed in 1993. Common associated minerals are baryte, gypsum, anhydrite, fluorite, dolomite and calcite. Galena forms octahedral crystals to 4cm (commonly 1cm)


Galena
Belgium
Liège Province, Verviers, Plombières-Vieille Montagne District, Kelmis, Moresnet, Schmalgraf Mine

Skeletal galena (gestrickter Bleiglanz) FOV 3cm wide© C.H.M.-Schäfer


Galena is found either in mesothermal veins (0.5 to 2km long and up to 10m wide) and skarn deposits. Mining began in the Roman period, but greater exploitation dates from the Turkish period. Mining is still being carried out in a number of areas. Common associates include sphalerite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, albandite, tetrahedrite with a gangue of quartz, manganocalcite and rhodochrosite. Galena is commonly formed as cubes or octahedrons up to 20cm in size. Epitaxial growths, etch figures and spinel twins are frequently observed.


Galena
Bulgaria
Plovdiv Oblast, Rhodope Mts, Djurkovo Complex, Droujba (Drujba) Mine

"Hoppered" Galena xls to 1cm with Quartz© Edwards Minerals



Galena
Bulgaria
Smolyan Oblast, Rhodope Mts, Madan ore field, Angel Yanakiev Mine, Karaaliev dol deposit

Galena 45cm wide© Anton Ivanov
Galena & Chalcopyrite 6.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Galena
Bulgaria
Smolyan Oblast, Rhodope Mts, Madan ore field, Krushev dol mine, Krushev dol deposit

Galena & Quartz 2.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Galena
Bulgaria
Smolyan Oblast, Rhodope Mts, Madan ore field, Septemvri mine

Galena 9cm wide© Anton Ivanov
Galena 7cm wide© fabreminerals.com


Galena
Canada
Nunavut Territory, Little Cornwallis Island, Polaris Mine (Arvik Mine)

Galena 7.8cm wide© D.K.Joyce
Galena on Sphalerite 3.4cm wide© Cindy Hasler


Galena ~6cm wide© C. Stefano '09


The Polaris mine was discovered in 1972 and was the most noretherly metal mine. Production was between 1981 and 2002 with 20 million tons of 17% ore. The ores are considered to ba a Mississippi Valley type and are found in a dolomite between 60 and 300 meters in depth. Galena cubes to 6cm were found, although a lot of the ore is scalenblende.
We need some photos of good specimens!


Galena
Canada
Ontario, Wentworth Co., Hamilton, Dundas, Lafarge Dundas North Quarry

Galena on Marcasite ~12.5 cm wide©



Galena
Czech Republic
Bohemia, Central Bohemia Region, Příbram, Březové Hory (Birkenberg)

3cm Radial hemisphere of Galena© Jakub Jirásek



Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Aachen, Eschweiler, Hastenrath, Meyer Quarry

Galena 8cm wide© Harjo
Galena on Aragonite 15cm wide© Harjo


Galena© Harjo


In 2007 a couple of huge pockets lined with Galena crystals up to 3 cm were found by a couple of German and Dutch collectors. The specimens became instant classics, they go for a fair amount of Euros these day and they drew a lot of attention during that year's Mineralientagen in Munich. From the main pocket came plates of mainly octahedral Galena modified by the cube, in another pocket some plates were still attached to the underlying Aragonite. Specimens up to 20 cm wide were found, some of them had mirror-like lustre whereas other ones were etched or had a layer of Anglesite on them. Accompanying minerals were Sphalerite, Aragonite, Calcite, Dolomite, Smithsonite, Malachite, Rosasite, Pyrite, Marcasite, Anglesite and Cerussite.


Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Bad Laasphe, Fischelbach, Gonderbach Mine

Perfect, isolated tabular twins to 3 cm across. They were named "Gonderbach slabs" (Gonderbacher Platten) for this locality.
We need photos!!

Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Eifel Mts, Mechernich, Mechernicher Bleiberg

Galena on Quartz FOV 2cm wide© Peter Haas



Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Niederberg area, Wülfrath, Rohdenhaus, Rohdenhaus Quarry

Galena @ Cerussite FOV 4mm wide© Thieme


Also known are pseudomorphs of 1cm calcite scalenohedra from Grube Friedrichssegen (near Koblenz).


Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Siegerland, Neunkirchen, Salchendorf, Pfannenberger Einigkeit Mine

Gonderbach twins to 5 cm across, also perfect spinel twins.
We need photos!!


Galena
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Siegerland, Herdorf

Galena, spinel law twin ~5cm wide©



Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Siegerland, Wilnsdorf, Niederdielfen, Grimberg Mine

Galena 3.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Galena
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Bernkastel-Kues, Kautenbach Mine

Galena @ Pyromorphite ~10cm tall©
Galena @ Pyromorphite ~5cm wide©
.
Galena @ Pyromorphite 7cm wide© Kristalle and Crys


Galena @ Pyromorphite ~5cm tall©



Galena
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Freiberg District, Freiberg

Galena var."Ringel-erz Formation" 6cm© Simone Citon


Most of the mines in the Freiberg District produced fine groups of octahedral galena (2cm). Most sought after by collectors are specimens of galena crystals on honey-yellow fluorite from Beihilfe Mine (pictures!!!). Galena is often associated with fluorite, pyrite/marcasite, sphalerite and, occasionally, with sulphosalts. Gonderbach twins have also been found along with skeletal crystals in barite.


Galena
Germany
Saxony-Anhalt, Harz Mts, Harzgerode, Neudorf

Galena with Siderite & Calcite 7 cm© Rob Lavinsky
Galena on Quartz 5cm tall©


Galena on Quartz ~9cm wide©
Galena on Siderite ~9cm wide©

Neudorf is famous for the fine galena and bournonite specimens that were recovered from the Meiseberg and Pfaffenberg mines during their active working period. The galena crystals, typically showing combinations of cubic, octahedral and dodecahedral faces - the so-called Neudorf habit - did reach impressing sizes of up to 12 cm along the edges.


Galena
Ireland
Co. Tipperary, Silvermines District

Galena 5.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Galena on Pyrite 3.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Galena & minor Pyrite 4.3cm© Rob Lavinsky


160Mt of lead/zinc ore. Similar to Mississippi Valley Type deposits but with a synsedimentary component and much higher deposion temperatures in limestones and dolomites. Mining started in the Middle Ages, but the mine is known to the mineral community for the discovery of a large vug (3 meters long, 1 meter high and 2 meters wide) in 1978 collected by Richard Barstow. This vug produced specimens of galena, honey-yellow sphalerite and pyrite. Galena occurred as mirror-bright cuboctahedral crystals up to 2.5 cm across. The primary minerals include sphalerite, galena, pyrite, barite and siderite. The mines are currently flooded.


Galena
Italy
Piedmont, Torino Province, Canavese District, Chiusella Valley, Traversella, Traversella Mine

6mm prismatic Galena xls on Dolomite© G. Fraccaro



Galena
Italy
Sardinia, Carbonia-Iglesias Province, Iglesias, Punta della Torre, San Giovanni Mine

3mm "hoppered" Galena crystal© Marco Barsanti



Galena
Italy
Sardinia, Medio Campidano Province, Arbus, Montevecchio Mines

Galena FOV ~1cm© D: Preite



Galena
Italy
Tuscany, Lucca Province, Apuan Alps, Stazzema, Bottino Mine

3mm Galena twin© Marco Barsanti



Galena
Japan
Honshu Island, Chubu Region, Niigata Prefecture, Shiraita mine

Galena, Chalcopyrite & Quartz ~10cm wide©


Much larger galena crystals are known from this area, for example cuboctahedrons up to 10cm from the Daira mine. A museum in Japan has a distorted cube about 12cm in size from the Ani mine. The mines are all closed and no more sulphides are coming out.


Galena
Mexico
Chihuahua, Mun. de Aquiles Serdán, Santa Eulalia District, West Camp, Francisco Portillo, La Purísima Mine

Galina altering to Anglesite 5.8cm© Rob Lavinsky



Galena
Peru
Lima Department, Huarochiri Province, Casapalca

Galena 14.5cm tall© Dan Weinrich



Galena altered to Anglesite
Poland
Upper Silesia (Śląskie), Rybnik Coal Basin, Rybnik, Ignacy-Hoym coal mine

Anglesite @ Galena with Sulfur FOV 1.7cm© Peter Haas



Galena
Russia
Far-Eastern Region, Primorskiy Kray, Dal'negorsk

Galena 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Galena 8cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Galena & Quartz 10cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The mineral deposits in the Dal'negorsk area were probably known in the 12th or 13th centuries, but exploitation of the deposits started about 1900. The deposits are located in hedenbergite skarns. The deposits have produced a number of other world class specimens including calcite, fluorite, pyrrhotite, and quartz. Galena crystals usually are cubo-octahedral crystals, but cubes and octahedrons are known (usually less than 4cm), which sometimes display growth steps. Spinel twins are relatively common (and are sometimes epitaxial on sphalerite and pyrrhotite). Mosaic, skeletal and lattice specimens can be up to 30cm in size.


Galena
Russia
Far-Eastern Region, Primorskiy Kray, Dal'negorsk, Nikolaevskoe Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, Nikolaevskiy Mine

Galena & Calcite 7.4cm© fabreminerals



Galena
Spain
Basque Country, Guipúzcoa, Beasaín, Mutiloa, Troya Mine

Galena, Siderite, Quartz & Dolomite 4.8cm© fabreminerals



Galena
Sweden
Lappland, Arjeplog, Nasafjäll silver mine

Galena 3cm wide© Jorge M. Alves


The Nasafjäll Silver mine is a hydrothermal Pb/Zn/As deposit with some Sb and Ag. The metal deposit lies in quartz lenses and gangues between the precambrian basement granite and metamorphic schists from the caledonian orogeny. The ore was discovered in the 1620-ties and has been worked in three periods; The first period from 1635- 1659, the second from 1770 to 1810 and finally some test production in the 1850-ties. Due to the harsh climate, remote location and limited ore resources the operations has never been profitable. Good records on the annual production figures ( swedish text) can be obtained from the Swedish Geological Survey (SGU).

Galena occurs in gangues and lenses within the quartz, and lenses up to and exceeding 10 cm can be found even today. I guess there will never be a lot of good material from here on the market, the location is still too remote ( 2-2 1/2 hour hike one way) and harsh ( Altitude 1000m above sea level at the artic circle) to justify any operations, whether for specimens or ore. It is a beautiful landscape though.

Galena
Switzerland
Wallis, Binn Valley, Im Feld, Lengenbach Quarry

Galena FOV 3mm wide© Stephan Wolfsried



Galena
UK

The best Cornish galenas came from Chiverton Mine. Matlock produced fine octahedrons, often associated with calcite. Penines are Mississippi Valley Type ores. Mining for lead dates from the Roman times.


Galena
UK
England, Co. Durham, North Pennines, Weardale, Ireshopeburn, Blackdene Mine

Galena, Fluorite & Calcite 4.3cm© Peter Haas


The Blackdene has produced the finest British specimens. Loose floater groups of cubic or cubo-octahedral crystals up to 20cm on edge were found. Specimens also have associated fluorite and calcite.


Galena
UK
England, Co. Durham, North Pennines, Weardale, Rookhope District, Boltsburn Mine

Galena & Siderite 5cm wide© 2007, Jesse Fisher
Galena & Siderit ~7cm tall©


Galena
UK
England, Cornwall, Camborne - Redruth - St Day District, Gwennap area, Baldhu, Wheal Jane

Galena 7cm wide© Peter Haas



Galena
UK
England, Cornwall, Liskeard District, Menheniot Area, Lanreath, Herodsfoot Mine

1.5mm Galena crystal© Steve Rust
Galena & Quartz ~7.5cm wide©


Galena
UK
England, Cornwall, St Agnes District, Perranzabuloe, Wheal Hope

Galena @ after Pyromorphite 10.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Galena @ Pyromorphite ~8cm©


Galena
UK
England, Cumbria, North and Western Region, North Pennines, Alston Moor District

Galena on Quartz 9.3cm wide© fabreminerals
Galena & Fluorite ~7.5cm tall©




Galena
UK
England, Cumbria, North and Western Region, North Pennines, Alston Moor District, Nenthead, Smallcleugh Mine

1cm Galena crystals© Don Rust


Galena from here is associated with sphalerite, fluorite ankerite. Galena (cubo-octahedral crystals to 2.5cm) are found on ankerite.


Galena
UK
England, Derbyshire

Galena ~10cm wide©


Some 2000 named veins contained galena. 4 to 6 million tonnes of galena ore are estimated to have been mined (primarily in the 19th century, but dating back to Roman times). Cubo-octahedrons to 5cm. Was found primarily as veins in Carboniferous limestones in Mississippi Valley Type deposits. Also from Derbyshire came epiaxial growths of fluorite on galena.


Galena
UK
England, South Gloucestershire, Chipping Sodbury District, Hampstead Farm Quarry

Galena, Calcite & Barite FOV 3cm?© Steve Rust



Galena
UK
Scotland, Strathclyde, South Lanarkshire, Leadhills

Galena 7.5cm wide© J.Ralph 2009


Veins of quartz and ankerite with calcite, aragonite, barite and galena in sedimentary rocks.


Galena
UK
Wales, Powys (Radnorshire), Rhayader

Galena ~7.5cm tall©



Galena
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Cave-in-Rock Sub-District, Cave-in-Rock

Galena 7.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The district mines were first opened for their lead content, but when a market for fluorite developed, galena just became a mineral that was secondarily recovered.


Galena
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Harris Creek Sub-District, Goose Creek Mine Group, Denton mine

Galena & Fluorite 8cm cm wide© 2008 Jesse Fisher



Galena
USA
Illinois, Jo Daviess Co., Galena District, Galena

Galena & Pyrite ~10 cm wide©


Deposits in the area were worked by the French in the latter part of the 17th century. American settlers started moving in by the 1820's with most major areas being discovered by the 1840's. Lead production declined with the start of zinc mining in the 1860's the lead was a byproduct. Total lead produced was 72,000 tons and zinc with 846,000 tons. The only remaining mines are some tourist operations. The main ore bodies are in Ordovician rocks, but other age rocks contain subeconomic quantities of the minerals.

The crystal habit of galena changes from cubes to cubo-octahedrons to octahedrons as you go from early to late in the ore deposition process. Oxidation of the ore only led to minor surface alterations to anglesite and cerussite.


Galena
USA
Kansas, Cherokee Co., Tri-State District, Picher Field, Baxter Springs

Galena 11cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Galena 6.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The Tri-State district was apparently found in 1838, although the first major discovery was made in 1848. It produced $2 billion dollars worth of lead (3.7 million tons of concentrate) and zinc (22 million tons of concentrate) from 1880 to 1955. The ores are hosted in breccias of a Mississippian limestone that contains abundant chert. The ore deposits occur within an area of 100 by 30 miles.

Galena crystals occur to 25cm with cubes and octahedrons on a matrix of cream to pink saddle shaped dolomite crystals. The district also produced world class sphalerite and calcite crystals. Most of the mines were interconnected and it was possible to travel between the states of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma without ever seeing the surface. The mineral dealer most associated with the district was "Boodle" Lane, who was active from the 1920's to the early 1960's. He saved many tons of fine specimens from the smelters. He would sell 200 pound "oil drum" lots at 50 cents a pound. The mines were allowed to flood about 1972. One of my favorite specimens at the Smithsonian are a couple of galena cubes (~5cm) from the Fisher mine. On each corner there are perched 1 cm cubes.


Galena
USA
Kansas, Cherokee Co., Tri-State District, Picher Field, Galena

Galena & Sphalerite 12cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Galena 3.3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Galena
USA
Kansas, Cherokee Co., Tri-State District, Picher Field, Treece, Mid Continent Mine

Galena & Calcite 6.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Galena 2.9cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Galena
USA
Missouri, Crawford Co., Viburnum No. 27 mine

Galena on Pyrite 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Galena
USA
Missouri, Iron Co., Viburnum Trend District, Bixby, Buick Mine

Galena spinel twins 5.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Galena 9cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Galena
USA
Missouri, Jasper Co., Tri-State District, Joplin Field

Galena 7cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts



Galena
USA
Missouri, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend District, Ellington, Sweetwater Mine

Galena 5cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
Galena 9cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Galena 4.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Galena 1.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Galena cubes occur to 30cm. on a limestone or chalcopyrite matrix. One large cube was found in 1971 that weighed a 1000kg (it was reduced to ore).


Galena
USA
New Mexico, Socorro Co., Hansonburg District, Bingham, Blanchard Mine

Galena altered to Anglesite, Linarite etc. 4.3cm© Borrelli
Galena to Anglesite & Linarite 4.5cm© Collectors Edge

Galena crystals from here are often pseudomorphed by anglesite or cerussite.


Galena
USA
New York, St Lawrence Co., Rossie

Galena & Calcite 10cm wide©
Galena ~20cm wide©


Galena ~2.5cm wide©
Galena ~11cm wied©


Mining began in 1834 and the mining was finished in about 1840 (over 1625 tons of lead) with only desultory operations thereafter. The main ore bodies were on 4 nearly vertical calcite-galena veins which cut Precambrian Grenville-series crystalline rocks. The veins varied in width from a few cm's to a meter, but averaged 2 feet in width in the mines.


Galena
USA
Tennessee, Smith Co., Central Tennessee Ba-F-Pb-Zn District, Carthage, Elmwood mine

Galena 5.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Simple cubes were extremely rare, most galena specimens showed numerous offset crystals. Galena specimens from Elmwood are among the rarer specimens recovered from the mine.







Click here to view Best Minerals G and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.



Edited 33 time(s). Last edit at 10/06/2014 03:01AM by Ralph Bottrill.
Anonymous User
Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 04:03PM
Polaris mine (Canada) for superb lustrous and sharp cubes in to over 6 cm (6 cm is the largest I think I have seen to date.. there may be bigger ones) [www.mindat.org]

Dundas quarry ( [www.mindat.org] ) also produced some very nice specimens.
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 04:08PM
    
We need to get some decent photos from those localities though.
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 04:35PM
[www.mindat.org]

best, joe
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 05:22PM
    
The Galena, IL piece seems to me to be a Tri-State specimen. It appears to be on chert and I've never seen individual marcasite and sphalerite crystals on the IA, IL, WI pieces---they nearly always, at least to my experience, occur as aggregates of crystals. Perhaps someone can take a closer look and agree or disagree.

Best regards,
Dana

PS-love the pseudo after cerussite! Need a Rossie, NY piece and, one of my favorite galena localities, the Mogul mine in Ireland.
avatar Mogul Mine....
June 13, 2009 06:30PM
Hey Dana and everyone...Jaf


[www.mindat.org]
Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 06:44PM
    
Nasafjäll silver mine, Arjeplog, Lappland, Sweden

The Nasafjäll Silver mine is a hydrothermal Pb/Zn/As deposit with some Sb and Ag. The metal deposit lies in quartz lenses and gangues between the precambrian basement granite and metamorphic schists from the caledonian orogeny.

The ore was discovered in the 1620-ties and has been worked in three periods; The first period from 1635- 1659, the second from 1770 to 1810 and finally some test production in the 1850-ties. Due to the harsh climate, remote location and limited ore resources the operations has never been profitable. Good records on the annual production figures ( swedish text) can be obtained from the Swedish Geological Survey (SGU).

Galena occurs in gangues and lenses within the quartz, and lenses up to and exceeding 10 cm can be found even today.

I guess there will never be a lot of good material from here on the market, the location is still too remote ( 2-2 1/2 hour hike one way) and harsh ( Altitude 1000m above sea level at the artic circle) to justify any operations, whether for specimens or ore. It is a beautiful landscape though.
© 1
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 07:13PM
    
Spectacular specimens came from the Siegerland and Dillenburg iron mining areas of Germany. Two better known localities (among others) are:

Gonderbach Mine: [www.mindat.org]
Perfect, isolated tabular twins to 3 cm across. They were named "Gonderbach slabs" (Gonderbacher Platten) for this locality

Pfannenberger Einigkeit: [www.mindat.org]
Gonderbach twins to 5 cm across, also perfect spinel twins.

Most of the mines in the Freiberg District produced fine groups of galena.
Most sought after by collectors are specimens of galena crystals on honey-yellow fluorite from Beihilfe Mine.

A unique locality is Mechernich, where bright galena cubes occur along with corkite in a sandstone conglomerate:
[www.mindat.org]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The best Cornish galenas came from Chiverton Mine:
[www.mindat.org]

Matlock produced fine octahedrons, often associated with calcite:
[www.mindat.org]

Also from Derbyshire came epiaxial growths of fluorite on galena.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fine galena was also found at Trepca.
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 07:27PM
[www.mindat.org]

Very Large Kruschev Dol Mine specimen....just under 6000.0 grams..joe
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 07:38PM
    
Another one to prove that size doesn't matter ...
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 07:47PM
Uploaded two specimens of Scottish galena from the National Museums of Scotland collection (slowly uploading a load of photos I took there last month)

[www.mindat.org]

[www.mindat.org]
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 07:55PM
    
Thanks for the info all
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 08:58PM
Another one to prove that size doesn't matter .

I have been trying to convince my wife, unsuccessfully, of that for years....much easier with galena...Jaf
avatar Re: Galena
June 13, 2009 09:50PM
    
David, two years ago a major Galena discovery was made in Mayer quarry, Hastenrath, Germany.
A couple of huge pockets lined with galena crystals were found by a couple of German and Dutch collectors.
The specimens became instant classics, they go for a fair amount of Euros these day.
From the main pocket came plates of mainly octahedral modified by the cube, in another pocket some plates were still attached to the underlying Aragonite.
I was happy to find a couple of good ones myself winking smiley
There is an article about the find in Mineralien Welt.

Galena
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Aachen, Eschweiler, Hastenrath, Meyer Quarry

Galena 8x7,5cm© Harjo
Galena, Aragonite 8x15cm© Harjo


Galena© Harjo


In 2007 a couple of huge pockets lined with Galena crystals up to 3 cm were found by a couple of German and Dutch collectors.
The specimens became instant classics, they go for a fair amount of Euros these day and they drew a lot of attention during that year's Mineralientagen in Munich.
From the main pocket came plates of mainly octahedral Galena modified by the cube, in another pocket some plates were still attached to the underlying Aragonite. Specimens up to 20 cm wide were found, some of them had mirror-like lustre whereas other ones were etched or had a layer of Anglesite on them. Accompanying minerals were Sphalerite, Aragonite, Calcite, Dolomite, Smithsonite, Malachite, Rosasite, Pyrite, Marcasite, Anglesite and Cerussite.

Cheers

Harjo



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 03/13/2011 10:53AM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Galena
June 14, 2009 05:21AM
Dave,
I have scanned in about 50 galena images from my slide file and will upload them as soon as I can clean them up.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Galena
June 14, 2009 09:29PM
David,
I didn't find any mention of galena from Romania. The mines at Herja and Turt have produced some very nice specimens. A couple of photos are attached. #302 is Galena pseudomorphing pyrrhotite from the Herja Mine. #982 is also from Herja.

Specimen #1085 is from the Gheturi Mine in Turt.

Also, I have several very nice specimens from the Tri-State District which have mines attributions, ie., Van Pool Mine in Picher, OK and Ballard Mine in Treece, KS. I'll upload these in another post since I'm at the limit of attachments.
Michael Shaw
Attachments:
open | download - 0302 Galena ps. pyrrhotite.jpg (534.6 KB)
open | download - 0982 Galena.jpg (473 KB)
open | download - 1085 Galena.jpg (270.7 KB)
avatar Re: Galena
June 14, 2009 09:41PM
Several more.

#1514 Cube-octahedral galena from the Van Pool Mine in Picher, Ottawa County, Oklahoma.

#0200 Galena from the Ballard Mine, Treece, Cherokee County, Kansas

#1527 complex galena crystals from the Alimon Mine, Pasco Dept., Peru

Michael Shaw
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open | download - 1514 Galena.jpg (203.5 KB)
open | download - 0200 Galena.jpg (972.4 KB)
open | download - 1527 Galena.jpg (398.5 KB)
avatar Re: Galena
June 15, 2009 01:00PM
    
Hi David and all,

Some nice Galena's where also found in Tsumeb, Bad Ems, Gube Eupel, Plombières and Sainte Marie aux Mines.

The pics will come your way soon.

I hope this helps.

Take care and best regards.

Paul.
avatar Re: Galena
June 15, 2009 03:28PM
Galena from the Kruchev dol Mine, Madan District, Smolyan Oblast, Bulgaria. The crystals exhibit an unusual flattened morphology with hoppered faces and mosaic textured dissolution features. Associated with two generations of calcite

Galena from the Borieva Mine, Madan District, Smolyan Oblast, Bulgaria. The crystals display disolved and reformed faces which give them a "melted" look.
avatar Re: Galena
June 15, 2009 03:40PM
Galena from the Fletcher Mine, Viburnum Trend District, Reynolds County, Missouri. The piece was mined in Fall 2008 from a new drift in the mine.
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