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Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
December 29, 2010 08:52AM
Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements A & B. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements C. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements D to I. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements J to M. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements N to P. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements R to Z. Click here to view Best Minerals P, Click here to view and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.


Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?




Included with the quartz pseudomorphs here are opal and chalcedony pseudomorphs after various minerals, fossils and crack fillings. These are listed below alphabetically by what ever it is they are after. Example: Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil wood will be listed with the Quartz after Fxxx pseudomorphs just before the Quartz after Galena pseudomorphs. Listing them this way keeps all the Quartz after fossils ofvarious plants and animals all grouped together.


Quartz after AnalcimeUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson

~4cm Quartz after Analcime




Quartz aftter Anhydrite with GypsumBrazilRio Grande do Sul

Quartz @ Anhydrite with Gypsum 6.2cm




Quartz var amethyst after Anhydrite?BrazilRio Grande do Sul

Quartz var amethyst @ anhydrite? ~49cm



These amethyst geodes, or cathedrals as they are sometimes called are mined from flat laying basalt layers in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil in large quantities. Perhaps a kiloton or two of them are produced each year. They are often cut in half and polished like this one is. Sometimes they have knobs and bumps and little stalactites of amethyst in them like this one. Sometimes they are said to be growing on what were at one time crystals of anhydrite but it is difficult to tell, unless you can see one of them broken open open or one that has been cut in half with a diamond saw. In some cases, these are found to be growing on prismatic calcite crystals. Here in Rio Grande, I think most of them may be formed after Anhydrite rather than Calcite. Other amethyst geodes, somewhat similar to these are mined from the basalts near Artigas, Uruguay, and these appear to be more commonly formed on calcite crystals. Stalactites from Uruguay are more common than Brazil. Most of the Uruguayan stalactites appear to have been formed on thin stringers of calcite?



Quartz after Anhydrite on amethystBrazilRio Grande do Sul, Alto Uruguai region, Iraí

Quartz @ Anhydrite on amethyst ~15cm?
Quartz @ Anhydrite on Quartz 7.7cm


Quartz @ Anhydrite 7cm tall




Quartz after AnhydriteBrazilRio Grande do Sul, Alto Uruguai region, Iraí

Quartz after Anhydrite 17cm wide
Quartz after Anhydrite 9cm wide


Quartz after Anhydrite?USAColorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Silverton, Cunningham Gulch

Quartz after Anhydrite? 7cm wide
Quartz after Anhydrite? 2.5cm tall


Quartz after Anhydrite? 3.6cm tall




Quartz after AnhydriteUSAConnecticut, Hartford Co., East Granby, Roncari quarry (Tilcon quarry)

Quartz after Anhydrite 3.9cm tall
Quartz after Anhydrite, flip side of left


Quartz after AnhydriteUSAConnecticut, Hartford Co., New Britain, Arute Field

Quartz after Anhydrite 10cm tall




Quartz after Anhydrite?USAConnecticut, New Haven Co., Southbury, O & G Southbury Quarry (Silliman Quarry; O & G No. 2 Quarry)

Quartz after Anhydrite? 8cm wide




Quartz after Anhydrite with CalciteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson

Quartz after Anhydrite with Calcite ~6cm wide



Quartz casts after anhydrite and glauberite are very common in the basalts of the Watchung Mountains in New Jersey and have been popular with collectors in the region for more than 100 years. One of the classic references to these and other trap rock minerals of the region is The Crystal Cavities of the New Jersey Zeolite region by Waldemar Theodore Schaller. It is an old 1932 United States Geological Survey Bulletin #832. Because of their proximity to densely populated urban areas, the Basalt quarries of New Jersey may have been responsible for creating more mineralogists and collectors than any other group of localities in the world. They have been producing specimens for perhaps 200 years and are still producing specimens today. Although their eminence for producing fine specimens has been somewhat diminished during the last 20 years because of the zeolites produced in huge quantities in the basalt quarries in the Deccan Traps in India.



Quartz after Anhydrite with Calcite & LaumontiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Prospect Park, Prospect Park Quarry (Sowerbutt Quarry; Vandermade Quarry; Warren Brothers Quarry)

Quartz @ Anhydrite with Calcite & Laumontite 12.5cm tall




Quartz after ApatiteMalawiZomba District, Mt Malosa

Quartz after Apatite 6.1cm tall




Quartz var. chalcedony after ApatiteUSAUtah, Iron Co., Iron Springs District (Iron and Granite Mountains & Three Peaks), Black Sallly Mine

Quartz var. chalcedony after Apatite ~13cm wide




Quartz after ApophylliteUSA
Idaho, Custer Co., Challis

Quartz after Apophyllite 22cm tall
Quartz after Apophyllite 16cm tall


Quartz after Apophyllite 13cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after AragoniteArgentinaChubut, Paso de Indios, Valle de las Plumas

Quartz var. chalcedony @ Aragonite 9cm
Quartz var. chalcedony @ Aragonite 5cm


Quartz after AragoniteHungaryBorsod-Abaúj-Zemplén Co., Zempléni Mts., Nyíri, Kandó Hill

Quartz after Aragonite 5.5cm wide
Quartz after Aragonite FOV 1.5cm


Quartz after Aragonite FOV 1.5cm
Quartz @ Aragonite 7.5cm


Quartz after AragoniteHungaryBorsod-Abaúj-Zemplén Co., Zempléni Mts., Telkibánya

Quartz after Aragonite 14cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after AragoniteUSANew Mexico, Luna Co., Cooks Peak District, Cooks Peak area

Quartz var. chalcedony after Aragonite ~4cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after AragoniteUSATexas, Brewster Co., Needle Peak (Sierra Aguja)

Quartz var. chalcedony after Aragonite 6.1cm wide




Quartz after AragoniteUSATexas, Brewster Co., Alpine, Woodward Ranch

Quartz after Aragonite ~8cm tall




Quartz after BaryteFranceAlsace, Haut-Rhin, Ste Marie-aux-Mines (Markirch), Grande Haldes

Quartz after Baryte 6.7cm wide




Quartz after BaryteIndiaMaharashtra, Jalgaon District

Quartz after Baryte 12cm wide




Quartz after BaryteMexicoZacatecas, Mun. de Concepción del Oro, El Cobre, Cobre Mine

Quartz after Baryte 14cm tall




Quartz after BariteMoroccoMeknès-Tafilalet Region, Khénifra Province

uartz after Barite 7.5cm wide




Quartz afer Barite with RealgarPeruHuancavelica Department, Angaraes Province, Julcani District, Julcani Mine

Quartz @ Barite w Realgar 16cm wide




Quartz after BariteRomaniaMaramures Co., Cavnic (Kapnic; Kapnik)

Quartz after Barite ~10cm wide




Quartz after BariteRomaniaMaramures Co., Cavnic (Kapnic; Kapnik), Cavnic Mine (Kapnikbánya)

Quartz after Barite 8.2cm wide
Quartz after Barite 8.1cm wide


Quartz after Barite 31cm wide




Quartz var. Chalcedony after BariteSlovakiaBanská Bystrica Region, Štiavnica Mts, Hliník nad Hronom

Quartz var. Chalcedony after Barite 7.5cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSAColorado, Mesa Co., Frutia

Quartz after Barite 2.5cm tall
Quartz after Barite 1.8cm tall


Quartz after BariteUSAColorado, Ouray Co., Silver Point Mine

Quartz after Barite 8cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSAColorado, San Juan Co., Arastra, Cunningham Gulch, Highland Mary Mine

Quartz after Barite 9.7cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSAColorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Silverton, Cunningham Gulch

Quartz after Barite 7cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSAColorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District

Quartz after Barite 8.7cm tall
Back side of left


Quartz after Barite?USAColorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Howardsville, Sunnyside Mine (American Tunnel; Mogul Mine; Washington Mine; Belle Creole; Gold Prince; Brenneman Mine; Sunnyside Mine Group)

Quartz after Barite? 11.5cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSARhode Island, Providence Co., Cumberland, Diamond Hill

Quartz after Barite 9cm tall




Quartz after BariteUSAUtah, Grand Co., Moab

Quartz after Barite 2.8cm wide




Quartz after BariteUSAUtah, Tooele Co., Oquirrh Mts, Tooele District

Quartz after Barite ~2cm wide




Quartz after Beta-quartzGermanyRhineland-Palatinate, Eifel Mts, Polch, Ochtendung, Wannenköpfe

Quartz after Beta-quartz FOV 2mm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony with hematite? after calcite?AustraliaQueensland, Etheridge Shire, Agate Creek

Quartz var. chalcedony with hematite? after calcite? 40cm across




Quartz var. opal after Calcite after Ikaite
AustraliaNew South Wales, Yungnulgra Co., White Cliffs

Opal @ Calcite @ Ikaite 12.8cm
Opal @ Calcite @ Ikaite ~9cm wide


Opal @ Calcite @ Ikaite ~7.5cm tall
Opal @ Calcite @ Ikaite ~7.5cm tall


Quartz var. opal @ Calcite @ Iakait 10.6cm



These are often referred to as opal pineapples. The ones that show some fire are particular rare, hard to get and very expensive. I don't think any of the ones showing fire would all cost less than 10K each. These may be the most valuable and sought after pseudomorph by collectors.


Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteAustriaCarinthia, Friesach - Hüttenberg area, Hüttenberg

Quartz var. chalcedony after Calcite 17cm




Quartz after Calcite septarin core (melicaria)BrazilRio Grande do Sul

Quartz @ calcite septarin core 6.9cm
Another view of left


Quartz after Calcite?BrazilRio Grande do Sul, Alto Uruguai region

Quartz after Calcite? ~7cm tall
Quartz @ Calcite on Quartz 10.4cm


Quartz after CalciteBulgariaPlovdiv Oblast, Rhodope Mts, Laki (Luki), Djurkovo Complex, Droujba (Drujba) Mine

Quartz after Calcite 7.2cm wide
Quartz after Calcite 6cm wide


Quartz after Calcite?BulgariaSmolyan oblast, Rhodope Mts, Madan ore field, Gradishte mine, Gradishte deposit

Quartz @ Calcite? on Quartz 10cm wide




Quartz after Calcite on FluoriteChinaHunan Province, Chenzhou Prefecture, Linwu Co., Xianghualing Sn-polymetallic ore field, Xianghualing Mine (Hsianghualing Mine)

Quartz after Calcite on Fluorite 9.7cm wide




Quartz after CalciteFranceBurgundy, Saône-et-Loire, Lucenay-l'Evêque, La Petite-Verrière, Voltennes mine

Quartz after Calcite 10cm wide




Quartz after Calcite?GreeceMacedonia Department, Chalkidiki Prefecture, Cassandra Mines, Stratoni operations, Madem-Lakko Mine (Madem-Lakkos Mine; Madem Laccos Mine)

Quartz after Calcite? ~5cm tall




Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteHungaryHeves Co., Mátra Mts., Gyöngyöstarján, Füledugó Quarry

Quartz var. chalcedony @ Calcite FOV 8mm
Quartz var. chalcedony @ Calcite FOV 1.2cm


Quartz var. chalcedony @ Calcite FOV 10mm




Quartz after Calcite with HematiteHungaryHeves Co., Mátra Mts., Parádsasvár (Üveghuta), Béke adit

Quartz @ Calcite with Hematite FOV 1.5cm




Quartz after CalciteIndiaMaharashtra, Jalgaon District

Quartz after Calcite 27cm wide




Quartz after CalciteIndiaMaharashtra, Mumbai District (Bombay District), Mumbai (Bombay), Ward 38, Malad

Quartz after Calcite 30.9cm tall




Quartz after CalciteIndiaMaharashtra, Nasik District

uartz after Calcite 22.4cm tall




Quartz after Calcite septarian core (melicaria)MexicoChihuahua, Mun. de Julimes, Julimes

Quartz after shrinkage cracks 8.2cm tall



These are apparently fairly abundant, but they are not all that common because they don't bring a high price from collectors, and they require a lot of cleaning. The clay that fills their many cavities in these specimens requires a lot of work to remove. Before the advent of the little hand held high pressure fabric guns it would be nearly impossible to clean these specimen well.


Quartz after CalciteMexicoGuanajuato

Quartz after Calcite 7cm wide
Quartz after Calcite 8.5cm


Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteMexicoSonora, Mun. de Nacozari de García

Quartz var. chalcedony after Calcite ~7.5cm tall




Quartz after CalciteMoroccoAtlas Mts, High Atlas Mts, Ourika Valley

Quartz after Calcite 11.8cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteNamibiaNamib Desert

Quartz var. chalcedony after Calcite 3.2cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteNamibiaErongo Region, Usakos and Omaruru Districts, Erongo Mountain

Quartz var. chalcedony after Calcite 5.4cm wide




Quartz after CalcitePakistanNorthern Areas, Baltistan

Quartz after Calcite 11.5cm




Quartz after CalciteRomaniaMaramures Co., Cavnic (Kapnic; Kapnik)

Quartz @ Calcite with Pyrite 10cm wide
Quartz @ Calcite 12cm


Quartz @ Calcite 14.8cm wide
Quartz afer Calcite 59cm wide


Quartz var. Chalcedony after CalciteSlovakiaBanská Bystrica Region, Štiavnica Mts, Banská Štiavnica Mining District, Banská Štiavnica (Selmecbánya; Schemnitz), Banská Štiavnica Mines

Quartz var. Chalcedony after Calcite 5cm tall




Quartz after Calcite & FluoriteSpainAsturias, Siero, La Collada area, La Viesca mine

Quartz after Calcite & Fluorite 10cm wide




Quartz after CalciteUKEngland, Cornwall, Wadebridge District, Area West of Wadebridge, St Minver, Pentire Glaze Mine

Quartz after Calcite 9.3cm wide
Close up of left

Note the "dirt" on the specimen. The chances are that this specimen is an old one. The reason behind this assumption is that most specimens today are cleaned better than this one to increase their value. During the last ten or fifteen years, collectors and dealers did not have access to the little fabric guns that are so handy in cleaning the dirt off of specimens. Chances are that if this specimen was found today, a minute or two in front of one of these little high pressure water guns would immediately clean the dirt off of this specimen. Often, just by looking at the amount of dirt on specimens in collections will give you a clue about how old it is.



Quartz var. amethyst after CalciteUruguayArtigas Department, Artigas

Quartz var. amethyst @ Calcite 8.1cm
Quartz var. amethyst @ Calcite, bottom side of left


Quartz var. amethyst @ Calcite 17cm
Quartz var. amethyst after Calcite 8.6cm tall


Quartz var. amethyst @ Calcite 9.6cm
Quartz var. amethyst @ Calcite flip side

The various amethyst mines near the little town or Artigas in northern Uruguay have produced a lot of amethyst casts after Calcite. In some specimens, you can still see the calcite and I suppose if you put these in a solution of hydrochloric acid you could remove the calcite from them you could create your own casts after calcite. Some of them are really amazing, and are of course in demand by collectors.



Quartz after CalciteUSAArizona, Pima Co., Tohono O'odom (Papago) Indian Reservation

Quartz after Calcite 9.5cm tall
Back side of left


Quartz after CalciteUSAColorado, Ouray Co., Ouray District (Uncompahgre District)

Quartz after Calcite 4.2cm wide
Quartz after Calcite, flip side


Quartz after Calcite4.7cm tall
Quartz after Calcite, flip side


Quartz after Calcite 16.1cm wide




Quartz after CalciteUSANew Mexico, Luna Co., Jose District

Quartz after Calcite 9cm wide




Quartz after CalciteUSANew Mexico, Luna Co., Jose District, Faywood Mine

Quartz after Calcite 8cm wide




Quartz after CalciteUSANew Mexico, Sierra Co., Cuchillo Negro District, Prospectors Delight mine

Quartz after Calcite ~20cm wide




Quartz after Calcite?USANew Mexico, Socorro Co., Magdalena District, Kelly Mine

Quartz after Calcite? ~8cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after CalciteUSATexas, Brewster Co., Alpine, Woodward Ranch

Quartz var. chalcedony after Calcite 5.5cm wide




Quartz after CalciteUSATexas, Reeves Co.

Quartz after Calcite ~7cm tall




Quartz after DanburiteMexicoSan Luis Potosí, Mun. de Charcas, Charcas

Quartz after Danburite 5cm tall
Quartz after Danburite 3.8cm tall


Quartz after DatoliteUKEngland, Devon, Dartmoor & Teign Valley District, Ilsington & Ashburton Area, Ilsington, Haytor Mine

Quartz after Datolite ~cm wide
Quartz after Datolite ~2.5cm across


Quartz after Datolite 5.6cm wide




Quartz after EpidoteUSAWashington, King Co., North Bend, Green Mountain, Bessemer Ridge

Quartz after Epidote 6.4cm tall
Quartz after Epidote 9.4cm tall


Quartz after FeldsparUSANorth Carolina, Rutherford Co.

Quartz after Feldspar 4.5cm wide




Quartz after FluoriteMoroccoAtlas Mts

Quartz after Fluorite< 5.6cm wide




Quartz after Fluorite?MoroccoMarrakech-Tensift-El Haouz Region, El Kelaâ des Sraghna Province, Sidi Rahhal

Quartz after Fluorite? 27cm wide




Quartz after FluroiteMoroccoMarrakech-Tensift-El Haouz Region, El Kelaâ des Sraghna Province, Sidi Rahhal

Quartz after Fluorite 17.6cm wide




Quartz after FluoriteMoroccoOriental Region, Oujda-Angad Province, Touissit District, Touissit, Bou Bekker (Bou Becker)

Quartz after Fluorite 20.4cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after FluoriteNamibiaKaras Region, Blinkpan

Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite 8.4cm tall
Quartz var. chalcedony after Fluorite side view



Quartz after FluoritePeruHuánuco Department, Dos de Mayo Province, Huallanca District, Huanzala Mine

Quartz after Fluorite 5.1cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after Fluorite? Scheelite?PortugalVila Real District, Cerva, Macieira

Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite? Scheelite? FOV 3cm




Quartz after FluoriteRomaniaMaramures Co.,Trestia

Quartz @ Fluorite 6cm
Quartz after Fluorite 5.2cm wide


Quartz after Fluorite 5cm wide




Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Durham, North Pennines, Co. Weardale, Bollihope District

Quartz after Fluorite ~7.5cm tall




Quartz after Fluorite & FluoriteUKEngland, Durham, North Pennines, Co. Weardale, Westgate, Heights Quarry

Quartz after Fluorite & Fluorite 4cm wside




Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Cornwall, Camborne - Redruth - St Day District, Gwennap, St Day United Mines (Poldice Mines), Wheal Gorland

Quartz after Fluorite ~8cm wide?




Quartz var. chalcedony after FluoriteUKEngland, Cornwall, Liskeard District, Menheniot Area, Menheniot, Wheal Mary Ann

Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite 14cm
Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite ~7.5cm wide


Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite 8.5cm
Quartz var. chalcedony @ Fluorite 7.5cm


Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Cornwall, St Austell District, Tywardreath, Fowey Consols (incl. Wheal Treasure; Wheal Fortune; Wheal Chance)

Quartz after Fluorite 5cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after FluoriteUKEngland, Cornwall, St Just District, St Just, Kenidjack Valley, Wheal Drea

Quartz var. chalcedony after Fluorite 4.5cm wide




Quartz after Fluorite & Sphalerite & GalenaUKEngland, Cumbria, North and Western Region (Cumberland)

Quartz after Fluorite & Sphalerite & Galena ~11.5cm wide




Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Cumbria, North and Western Region (Cumberland)

Quartz after Fluorite ~13cm tall




Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Cumbria, North and Western Region (Cumberland), North Pennines, Alston Moor District, Nenthead, Rampgill Mine

Quartz after Fluorite ~20cm wide
Quartz after Fluorite ~7cm wide


Quartz after FluoriteUKEngland, Northumberland, North Pennines, West Allendale, Coalcleugh, Coalcleugh Mine

Quartz after Fluorite, Size ??




Quartz after FluoriteUSAColorado, Ouray Co., Ouray District (Uncompahgre District)

Quartz after Fluorite 9cm wide




Quartz after Fluorite and ?USAColorado, San Juan Co., Eureka District, Gladstone, Gladstone Mine

Quartz after Fluorite and ? 9.8cm wide




Quartz after Fluorite and Barite?USAColorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Silverton, Genoa Claim

Quartz @ Fluorite and Barite? 6.3cm wide




Quartz var. opal after fossil pineconeAustraliaNew South Wales, Finch Co., Lightning Ridge

Opal after fossil pinecone 1.8cm wide




Quartz var. opal after fossil plant stemAustraliaNew South Wales, Finch Co., Lightning Ridge

Opal after plant stem 6.8cm long




Quartz var. opal after fossil plant stemsAustraliaNew South Wales, Finch Co., Lightning Ridge, Coocoran Opal Fields

Opal after plant stems




Quartz var. opal after fossil Hypsilophodontid dinosaur toothAustraliaNew South Wales, Finch Co., Lightning Ridge, Coocoran Opal Fields

Opal @ Hypsilophodontid dinosaur tooth 5cm




Quartz var. opal after fossil bivalve mollusc shellAustraliaNew South Wales, Finch Co., Lightning Ridge, Coocoran Opal Fields

Opal @ bivalve mollusc shell 2.1cm
Opal @ bivalve mollusc shell 2.1cm


Quartz var opal after fossil woodAustraliaNew South Wales, Yungnulgra Co., White Cliffs

Quartz var opal after fossil wood 2.5cm wide




Quartz var. opal after fossil bivalve shellAustraliaSouth Australia, Andamooka Ranges - Lake Torrens area, Andamooka opal fields

Opal after bivalve shell 3.4cm wide




Quartz var. opal after snail shellAustraliaSouth Australia, Andamooka Ranges - Lake Torrens area, Andamooka opal fields

Opal after snail shell ~1.8cm wide



Some collectors would murder their grandmother for one of these. These are very rare and I don't think I have ever seen more than two or three good ones.


Quartz var. opal after fossilAustraliaSouth Australia, Andamooka Ranges - Lake Torrens area, Andamooka opal fields

Opal after fossil ~4cm wide
Quartz var opal @ a 3cm fossil snail


Quartz var Opal after fossil belemnitesAustraliaSouth Australia, Coober Pedy - Everard Range Regions, Coober Pedy

Quartz v. opal @fossil belemnites 12cm wide
Quartz v. opal @ fossil belemnites 12cm wide

The fossils seen here are not in their natural state. They have been removed from the matrix and their exteriors polished and put back into the matrix. The example on the right looks a bit cracked and this may or may not have been caused by the heat generated during the polishing process because opal is rather heat sensitive.


Quartz, var Chalcedony after fossil woodCzech RepublicBohemia (Böhmen; Boehmen), Plzen Region, Plzen-North, Kralovice, Plasy, Kaznejov

Quartz, var petrified wood ~9cm wide
Top view of left


Quartz var Chalcedony with Fluorite after fossil woodGermanySaxony, Chemnitz, Hilbersdorf

Quartz var Chalcedony w Fluorite @ wood 6cm




Quartz var. Chalcedony after fossil gastropodRussiaPovolzhsky Region, Saratov Oblast', Danguz village

Quartz var. Chalcedony @ fossil gastropod ~5cm?




Quartz var. Chalcedony after fossil woodUSAArizona, Apache Co., Petrified Forest National Monument, Petrified Forest
Quartz var. Petrified wood
Quartz var. petrified wood

Fine specimens of petrified wood from this locality are justifiably world famous. I don't think that any other locality has produced such fine, large, beautiful and abundant specimens. More than anything else their fame rests on the beautiful colors of various reds, yellows and blue that specimens from here sometimes display all in the same piece. Petrified wood from most other locations seem drab in comparison. Some of these logs can be several feet in diameter and weigh so many tons that they have not been moved from their original locations. The Lyon's share of these specimens have thankfully been preserved inside the Petrified Forest National Park near Holbrook, Arizona, USA, but on ranches surrounding the national park, there is still a lot of material that is available and from time to time will still be collected and cut and polished into beautiful "rounds". Some of the logs that have been found are too big to be moved and have been cut into sections in place by big wire saws that have been erected at the site of these logs. Beautiful slabs of logs from this locality more than a meter in diameter have been cut and polished and are cherished by those who have them and admired by those who have seen them. They are worth many thousands of dollars each.


Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil woodUSAArizona, Navajo Co., Holbrook

Quartz var. petrified wood 12cm




Quartz var opal after fossil woodUSANevada, Humboldt Co., Virgin Valley District

Quartz v. opal after wood 2cm
opal @ wood 5.5cm

The black fire opal limb casts are highly valued by collectors and the fine ones often sell for many thousands of dollars. They are generally considered to be not very stable and subject to cracking over time after being removed from the ground. Usually they are kept oil or water to preserve them. Back in the day one of the persons who dug and specialized in this kind of opal was Kieth Hodson who lived in Phoenix, Arizona. He lived in Phoenix because the winter weather at the opal mines in Nevada was so bad that you didn't want to live there if you could help it, let alone try and dig there. In his store, he had a fish tank, and in the bottom of the fish tank were fine large precious opal limb casts which by todays standards would be worth several million dollars. It was an amazing sight.



Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil woodUSAUtah, San Juan Co.

Quartz var. petrified wood ~50cm wide




Quartz var chalcedony after fossil woodUSAUtah, Wayne Co., Hanksville

Quartz var petrified wood ?cm wide




Quartz var. chalcedony after woodUSAWyoming, Fremont Co., East Fork Wind River

Quartz v. petrified wood 10.8cm
polished top of left



Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil woodUSAWyoming, Sweetwater Co., Eden Valley, Hay's Ranch

Quartz var. petrified wood 8.9cm tall




Quartz v. chalcedony after fossil coralUSAFlorida, Hillsborough Co., Tampa, Tampa Bay

Quartz v. chalcedony @ coral 13.4cm tall
Back side of left


Quartz v. chalcedony @ coral 13.2cm
Quartz v. chalcedony @ coral 18.2cm tall


Quartz v. chalcedony @ coral ~11cm
Quartz v. chalcedony @ coral 9.7cm tall


Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil coral 18.1cm wide



These chalcedony pseudomorphs after coral have been collected and appreciated by collectors for more than 100 years. Some collectors have specialized in collecting them and have set up little lapidary factories in their garages to cut and polish these beautiful objects.


Quartz var. Chalcedony after fossil shellUSAFlorida, Hillsborough Co., Tampa, Tampa Bay, Davis Islands

Quartz var. Chalcedony after shell ~4.5cm wide



These are quite rare and I have never been able to find a good one for my collection in spite of looking for one for more than 40 years.




Quartz after fossil shellUSAGeorgia, Burke Co., Girard District, Girard

Quartz after a 3.5mm fossil shell




Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil Collenia undosa stromatolitesUSAMinnesota, St. Louis Co., Mesabi Range, Mary Ellen Pit

chalcedony @ stromatolites 11cm
Quartz var. @ stromatolites ~45cm


Quartz var. chalcedony after fossil coralUSAUtah, Summit Co., Woodland, Woodland Quarry

Quartz var. chalcedony @ coral 7.5cm long



In the past, these were abundant and I have seen hoards of this material in the hands of various field collectors of several hundred pounds, but today they are almost a thing of the past.



Quartz after GlauberiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Little Falls Township, Houdaille Quarry (Consolidated Stone and Sand Company Quarry; Consolidated Quarry)

Quartz @ Glauberite 4cm
Quartz after Glauberite ~8cm wide


Quartz after GlauberiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson

Quartz after Glauberite 6.5cm across




Quartz after GlauberiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson, Lower New Street quarry

Quartz after Glauberite ~4cm wide
Quartz after Glauberite ~7cm wide


Quartz after Glauberite ~7cm wide
Quartz after Glauberite ~12.5cm wide


Quartz after GlauberiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Paterson, Upper New Street Quarry (Burger's Quarry)

Quartz after Glauberite ~6.5cm wide
Quartz after Glauberite ~10cm wide


Quartz after GlauberiteUSANew Jersey, Passaic Co., Prospect Park, Prospect Park Quarry (Sowerbutt Quarry; Vandermade Quarry; Warren Brothers Quarry)

Quartz after Glauberite ~9cm tall
Quartz after Glauberite ~7cm wide


Quartz after Glauberite ~10cm tall
Quartz after Glauberite 11cm wide



Quartz after GypsumUSANebraska, Dawes Co.

Quartz after Gypsum 4cm wide
Quartz after Gypsum 11cm wide


Quartz after Gypsum 6.3cm wide
Quartz after Gypsum 4.4cm wide

Nebraska is one of the states in the United States that politically correct people might call, mineralogically challenged. These are one of the few localities for mineral specimens that the state has. Because I wanted something in my collection from my Fathers home state I bought a mud pseudomorph after halite and it looks even worse than these specimens do. That will give you some idea how bad things are for mineral collectors living in Nebraska.



Quartz var. chalcedony after GypsumUSANebraska, Dawes Co., Crawford, Crawford Dam

Quartz var. chalcedony after Gypsum ~5cm wide




Quartz after HaliteUSAArizona, Yavapai Co.

Quartz after Halite ~4cm wide




Quartz after HaliteUSAPennsylvania, Perry Co., Ickesburg

Quartz after Halite 7.4cm wide




Quartz after HeulanditeIndiaMaharashtra, Jalgaon District

Quartz @ Heulandite on Apophyllite-(KF) 6.8cm




Quartz after LaumontiteUSAColorado, Teller Co., Cripple Creek District

Quartz after Laumontite 11.5cm tall
Same as left



Quartz after Laumontite?USAColorado, Teller Co., Cripple Creek District, Moffat Tunnel

Quartz after Laumontite? ~7.5cm wide




Quartz after LaumontiteUSAConnecticut, New Haven Co., Southbury, O & G Southbury Quarry (Silliman Quarry; O & G No. 2 Quarry)

Quartz after Laumontite 6.5cm tall
Back side of left


Quartz after LaumontiteUSAConnecticut, Tolland Co., Stafford, Diamond Ledge

Quartz after Laumontite on Quartz 19cm tall




Quartz after Magnesioriebeckite-Riebeckite Series var. crocidolite
CanadaOntario, Rainy River District, Hutchinson Township, Atikokan

Quartz @ Magnesioriebeckite-Riebeckite Series var. crocidolite 11.7cm




Quartz after Melanophlogite?FranceAuvergne, Puy-de-Dôme, Pont-du-Château

Quartz after Melanophlogite? 2cm tall??




Quartz var. Chalcedony after MordeniteHungaryHeves Co., Mátra Mts., Gyöngyösoroszi, Károlyvár

Quartz var. Chalcedony @ Mordenite 6.7cm




Quartz after ScheeliteUKEngland, Devon, Okehampton area (Northern Dartmoor), Ramsley Mine

Quartz after Scheelite ~3.25cm tall
Quartz after Scheelite ~2.5cm wide
.
Quartz after Scheelite 2cm wide


Quartz var, chalcedony agate after Scolecite?GermanyRhineland-Palatinate, Alzey, Nack, Teufelsrutsch

Quartz var, chalcedony agate @ Scolecite? 6cm




Quartz after SideriteUKEngland, Cornwall

Quartz after Siderite ~11cm wide




Quartz ater StibniteChinaGuizhou Province, Qianxi'nan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinglong Co., Qinglong (Dachang) Sb-Au deposit

Quartz ater Stibnite ~17cm wide
Quartz ater Stibnite ~9cm wide


Quartz var. Chalcedony after Stilbite?South AfricaNorthern Cape Province, Kalahari manganese fields, Hotazel, Wessels Mine (Wessel's Mine)

Quartz var. Chalcedony after Stilbite? 6.4 cm wide




Quartz after ThenarditeGermanyBaden-Württemberg

Quartz after Thenardite ~1.5cm wide?


Thenardite pseudos were reported in fine grained Volcanic Tufa, on Rosenegg Hill, in Hegau, South of Baden. The volcanic setting would seem to preclude the formation of Ikaite. Leuze(1886 & 1889) first noted the local for Calcite and rarer Quartz after Thenardite. Crystal diagrams, some as rare Twins, are included in Goldschmidt, under Thenardite.




Quartz after WulfeniteMexicoDurango, Mun. de Mapimí, Mapimí, Ojuela Mine

Quartz after Wulfenite 17cm wide




Quartz after WulfeniteNamibiaOtjikoto (Oshikoto) Region, Tsumeb, Tsumeb Mine (Tsumcorp Mine)

Quartz after Wulfenite 7.3cm wide




Quartz after WulfeniteUSAArizona, Gila Co., Dripping Spring Mts, Banner District, Hayden area, Chilito, Keystone Gulch, Reagan claims (Regan/Reagan Camp prospects; Lee Reagan property; Lee Reagan prospects; Kullman-McCool group), Finch Mine (Barking Spider Mine)

Quartz after Wulfenite?? 7.6cm wide
Quartz after Wulfenite?? 8.8cm wide


Quartz after Wulfenite 5.3cm wide
Quartz @ Wulfenite 4.5cm


Quartz after ?ChinaHubei Province, Huangshi Prefecture, Daye Co.

Quartz after ? & Calcite etc. 9cm tall




Quartz after ?FranceAuvergne, Allier, Ébreuil, Échassières, Beauvoir quarry

Quartz after ? 8.5cm wide




Quartz after ?PortugalVila Real District, Macieira, Cerva

Quartz after ? 8cm tall




Quartz after ?USARhode Island

Quartz after ? ~7.5cm wide










Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements A & B. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements C. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements D to I. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements J to M. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements N to P. Click here to view Pseudomorphs & Replacements R to Z. Click here to view Best Minerals P, Click here to view and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.



Images last selected December 2010 sorting on "after".

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 37 time(s). Last edit at 10/30/2012 07:07PM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 16, 2011 09:12PM
Rock,

Per comments in "A to C", I'm posting a set of specimens that hit localities and/or replacements not well represented in the articles at present, rather than saying these are all The Best. Thank you for your efforts!


Chalcedony after aragoniteChalcedony after aragonite
Needle Peak (Sierra Aguja), Brewster Co., Texas, USA
Brewster Co. is already represented, but these two examples are pretty sharp.

Quartz after anhydrite
São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
I added this one because the locality is different, but there are certainly better examples in the Rio Grande do Sul galleries. Not currently "approved" photo.

Quartz after barite
Frauenstein, Weisbaden, Germany

Quartz after calcite
Santa Eulalia District, Mun. de Aquiles Serdán, Chihuahua, Mexico

Quartz after fluorite
Aurora District, Mineral Co., Nevada, USA
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 16, 2011 10:56PM
Don, Thanks for your input on the Pseudomorphs of Quartz. Unfortunately it is my job to be the Devels advocate or perhaps St Peter at the gate and feel I need to make the following observations.

I would use you Needle Peak pseudo except for the fact that the specimen is not in focus. Have you considered taking you pictures with a tripod to reduce hand shake and to stop you aperture down to f22 so that the entire specimen will be in focus?

The Quartz after Anhydrite, at least that is what we presume them to be after does not come from Sao Gabriel. Sao Gabriel is/was a very small town in Rio Grande do Sul state near some of the amethyst/agate mines, but those mines never produced any of these type of casts. In fact during all my visits there, I never saw anything like those offered for sale by the local miners and distributors.

The Quartz after Barite looks suspiciously like Quartz after Anhydrite. I don't know much about the pseudos from that locality. How sure are you that those are pseudos after Barite?

Have you checked the hardness of the Quartz after Calcite? Will they scratch a crystal of orthoclase feldspar?

The Quartz after Fluorite looks good. Are there any of the pseudos on the back side broken open and if so is there any fluorite in place? We try not to include coating of quartz on other minerals as pseudomorphs in the article.

I have not taken the time yet to look at your other suggestions carefully, but will soon find the time to do that.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 17, 2011 05:31AM
Rock:

Thanks for the feedback. I had every expectation that you and/or others would raise questions on some of the pieces I flagged -- these wiki environments would be far less useful if that weren't the case. My main failing here is probably in believing the labels. I'll hit your points in order.

> I would use you Needle Peak pseudo except for the
> fact that the specimen is not in focus. Have you
> considered taking you pictures with a tripod to
> reduce hand shake and to stop you aperture down to
> f22 so that the entire specimen will be in focus?

I'll go back and reshoot. I did use a tripod and knew this one was not in focus for the entire sample, but actually liked the look of it anyhow. My set-up is pretty crude and I'm no expert, but I'll play around and see what I can do.


> The Quartz after Anhydrite, at least that is what
> we presume them to be after does not come from Sao
> Gabriel. Sao Gabriel is/was a very small town in
> Rio Grande do Sul state near some of the
> amethyst/agate mines, but those mines never
> produced any of these type of casts. In fact
> during all my visits there, I never saw anything
> like those offered for sale by the local miners
> and distributors.

I bought this one from Si and Ann Frazier, who I typically trust on all things quartz. Their label is listed as "Daniello Mine, Sao Gabriel" -- I've not been able to find any other reference to this locality, however. I'll check with them in the next few days to see if they have any more information.


> The Quartz after Barite looks suspiciously like
> Quartz after Anhydrite. I don't know much about
> the pseudos from that locality. How sure are you
> that those are pseudos after Barite?

Funny you highlight that -- I was starting to wonder the same. I was trying to figure out what a little mm-scale mineral on the regular quartz could be and was looking at the other minerals from the locality. When I saw anhydrite, it got me thinking because it sure looks a lot like the habit of the Brazilian anhydrites. Roger Lang had once pointed me to a link on mineralienatlas.de that confirmed Frauenstein was a real locality with barite present, but I don't know German at all and my browser doesn't like that site very much.


> Have you checked the hardness of the Quartz after
> Calcite? Will they scratch a crystal of orthoclase
> feldspar?

Have now tried in several places without luck, so it may not be quartz after all. Compared to several other Sta Eulalia pseudos I have, though, this one really does look like quartz and intergrown with the pseudos are little elongate crystals that seem to have hexagonal shapes; I can't get them to scratch the feldspar either, though.


> The Quartz after Fluorite looks good. Are there
> any of the pseudos on the back side broken open
> and if so is there any fluorite in place? We try
> not to include coating of quartz on other minerals
> as pseudomorphs in the article.

There are definitely parts that are broken open along the edges, but all are completely hollow with no evidence of fluorite anywhere. I think these qualify as epimorphs, in that the quartz doesn't seem to have replaced the fluorite but rather coated it and then outlasted it.


> I have not taken the time yet to look at your
> other suggestions carefully, but will soon find
> the time to do that.

I appreciate the consideration and the effort you put in to all of the MinDat work!
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 19, 2011 07:19AM
Rock:

Finally got the Needle Peak piece to be fully in focus and at a decent perspective. I hope this fits the guidelines better:

Quartz after aragonite

I'll write Si & Ann about the Sao Gabriel piece and check if they have any more info to add.

Cheers,
D.
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 19, 2011 01:09PM
Don,
Yep! that will do it. Ill put it in the article. Have you ever collected there? Its near the well known agate locality of the Woodard Ranch in Texas. I have seen these things around for years and wondered just how wide spread they are.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 19, 2011 04:06PM
    
I have a copy of the “Glossary of Geology” produced by the American Geological Institute. It defines pseudomorph as:

“A mineral whose outward crystal form is that of another mineral species. It has developed by alteration, substitution, incrustation, or paramorphism.”

If this is the accepted mineralogical context of the word pseudomorph, then petrified wood and other fossils would be eliminated because their form is not another mineral species. I hope that this comment is considered constructive at the time when the pseudomorph pages are being developed. Actually it makes no difference to me if a more general definition is used, the pages are beautiful and instructive and I enjoy looking at them.

Respectfully, Larry Maltby
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 19, 2011 08:43PM
Larry,
Thanks for bringing that "official" definition of a pseudomorph to my attention. I think that in the introductory remarks we will probably cite several different "official" definitions which will probably show that different people and organizations have different opinions as to what a pseudomorph is. I need to find someone to translate Blum's original definition as well. In these articles we will include a number of examples of things that can be considered pseudomorphs only the the loosest definition, like ice after water, minerals after old coins, atacamite after mouse etc. but in the text describing these pseudomorphs we will indicate that we have stretched the definition a bit. I would like to use the articles to get the idea across that perhaps our definition of exactly what a mineral is, is too strict and that mineralogists should "claim more territory" if they want to see the decline in mineralogical education stopped or reversed.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 26, 2011 06:01AM
    
Rock, a minor edit needed. The quartz psu datolite says US and should be UK.

Easy Goin'
USA
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 26, 2011 02:06PM
    
Thanks. Fixed.
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 28, 2011 03:57AM
    
@Don,

Your quartz after baryte is in fact most almost certainly quartz after anhydrite. While I don't remember a specific reference to Frauenstein, quartz after anhydrite has been described from (and is occasionally abundant in) the area around of Wiesbaden.
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs Quartz
January 30, 2011 06:48PM
Peter:

Thank you for the confirmation -- I'll change the description of that piece, as well as my label. Might also hit it with a water gun and re-shoot, as looking it over with the hand lens made me realize it was a little grotty.

Rock:

I should have posted this note here instead of as a throw-in for "D to I", but for these quartz pseudos I'd also nominate the quartz after garnet samples from Garnet Hill in Calaveras Co. There's one good one in the database already: quartz after garnet.

This locality also has interesting epidote after garnet, but my example wouldn't make the cut here. I know a few people who probably do, though, and I think I can get a little commentary on the occurrence of these pseudomorphs at the site. Most likely this will be after Tucson, given many of the principals are likely out of town. I'll take notes if I run into them there.

Cheers,
D.
Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 20, 2013 04:37PM
Rock,

For additional info on Chalcedony pseudomorphs after what are believed to be Melanophlogite, see my article "Unusual Quartz and Chalcedony Pseudomorphs from Canada's Alberta Badlands" in the Nov / Dec 2012 issue of Rocks & Minerals.

I can supply photos, including but not limited to those in the article.

Some of these pseudos take a plate-like form similar to Patrice Cmolik's specimen from Auvergne, Puy-de-Dôme, Pont-du-Château, France that's already in your article. The Alberta specimens are, however, less gemmy.

Cheers,

Mike
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 20, 2013 06:16PM
Mike, Can you upload a few of them? I'm sure that at least one or two would end up in the article. I have upgraded you to a level one and you can now upload images to mindat and new localities.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 20, 2013 11:31PM
Hi Rock,

I can add 2 pictures of quartz pseudomorphs from a Chinese locality. The quality of the pictures is not very good, but I think these are interesting additions regarding the locality. If you want, you can use the pictures.
Both pieces are self-collected in 2012 resp. 2013 in Yongping Cu-mine, Shangrao Pref., Jiangxi Prov., PR China.

Volkmar

Quartz var. Chalcedony ps. calcite on fluorite (width about 4 cm, find from 2012-12-02)


Quartz ps. fluorite (width about 7 cm, find from 2013-01-13)
Attachments:
open | download - 121202 Yongping 10a.JPG (243 KB)
open | download - 130113 Yongping 03.JPG (244.1 KB)
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 21, 2013 03:34AM
Volkmar,
Before I can put an image in a Best Minerals article, they must be formerly uploaded to Mindat's database. Would you like to do that? Do you need instructions on hot to do it? The reason for this is to clear up copyright issues regarding the photos and to make it accessible to anyone searching for that mineral on mindat.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 24, 2013 12:09AM
Rock,

I've now uploaded the 5 images of my chalcedony pseudos, but had some difficulty accessing and using the Photo Upload form.
In particular I was unable to enter a new locality, so please note that three of the specimens (my catalogue nos. MC16, UL1 and DW51), are from a new locality, as follows:

Battle River, northeast of Donalda, Alberta, Canada.

The minerals found at this location are:
-Chalcedony
-Quartz
-Calcite

For the Drumheller locality, you can also add Gypsum to the minerals list (crystals on specimens that I've collected)

The literature reference for both locations( Drumheller, and Battle River) is as follows:

Menzies, M.A., and Frazier, S. (2012) Unusual quartz and chalcedony pseudomorphs from Canada’s Alberta badlands. Rocks & Minerals, 87, 6, 512-521.


Would it be possible for you to make the changes?


Thanks,

Mike
Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 24, 2013 02:11AM
Yes. Rock, please could you give me some instructions for uploading pictures, I never did it before.

Thanks,
Volkmar
avatar Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
April 24, 2013 09:05PM
Mike,
Thanks for uploading those images. They are really interesting and Ill use them once we, or rather you get the new locality entered in Mindat. I know the first time around this may seem a little hard to do, but the fact that you managed to upload some images indicates a degree of computer literacy.

To enter new localities in Mindat, you need to do that from the locality pages, not the photo upload page. In you case you will need to go to the Alberta locality page:

http://www.mindat.org/loc-15153.html

And then click on the Edit/Add Sub Locality menu choices. I think you should be able to figure it out from there. Once the locality has been entered, you will be able to go back to your images and find the correct locality already in the system, select it and update the data on the photo upload page. Let me know if you have any problems.

To get to Alberta, just go to the locality field at the bottom of any page in type in Alberta.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Pseudomorphs & Replacements Quartz
August 21, 2013 08:12PM
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