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Wulfenite

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Wulfenite
November 06, 2008 08:14PM
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Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?


Wulfenite
PbMoO4 tetragonal

Wulfenite, Red Cloud Mine, La Paz Co. Arizona, USA, 6.3cm wide© Carles Millan

Mindat currently lists 1515 (June 2012) localities for wulfenite, but only a tiny fraction of those localities produce crystals that are of interest to collectors. Wulfenite crystals from Tsumeb have been reported up 60cm across have been reported (Mineralogical Record 1977, Pinch & Wilson p. 44 & Key p. 50. Dick Bideaux in his Handbook of Mineralogy gives 11 cm as the largest size for wulfenite, but he may have been referring only to pier reviewed articles or his own personal experience of crystals from the Glove mine of which perhaps 11cm was about as large as they got from that locality. If you want the largest by weight, it might be the 1.8kg wulfenite from M'fouati Mine, Republic of Congo (Brazzaville) There may be something like a dozen localities that have produced really fine specimens and of those, the crystals from the Red Cloud Mine in Arizona, USA are perhaps the most highly regarded by collectors. For some reason, many of the good wulfenite producing localities are found in Southern Arizona, and Northern Mexico. Why they should have been concentrated here is open to speculation. It is usually not a robust mineral, and if you have specimens of it, you should treat them gently, for many of them are quite fragile. Perhaps the most robust of them are the highly regarded blocky orange crystals from Los Lamentos, Mexico. Austria, China and Morocco have all produced many fine wulfenite specimens. Which are really the best? Well you will have to look at the eye candy below and make up your own mind. Keep in mind that the pictures shown are only of specimens that have been uploaded to the mindat image gallery and that in many cases there are better specimens lurking out there. Sometimes, when Wulfenite is found in mines, it is found in large quantities and tons of specimens are available, but most of the time they are shipped off to the smelter.


Wulfenite
Argentina
Mendoza, Altiplano de Payún Matru, Payún volcano

Wulfenite on Hematite after magnetite FOV~6mm© SMS 2010



These wulfenites are not particularly "displayable" because of their tiny size, but this is an exceptional photo micrograph of one and I think they deserve a mention just for the fact that they have a different origin than other wulfenites: primary deposit from fumarole gases rather than secondary oxide zone. Similar finds have been made in fumaroles on Iou-jima (Japan) and perhaps Tolbachik (Russia) too.
[Alfredo Petrov 2012]

Wulfenite
Argentina
Río Negro, Sierra Grande, Complejo Gonzalito district, Gonzalito mine

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, FOV 7mm© Karl Volkman04/05



Wulfenite
Australia
Western Australia, Pilbara Region, Roebourne Shire, Whim Creek

Wulfenite, 6x3,5cm© Tony Peterson
Wulfenite FOV 2cm© Tony Peterson

Wulfenite ~1.1mm© Enrico Bonacina
Wulfenite FOV 0,4cm© Harjo

Wulfenite, FOV 1cm© R. Tanaka
Wulfenite xl 3mm with Chrysocolla©

Wulfenite, 3.4cm wide© CCURTO2008
Wulfenite & Calcite, 7.5cm© Mark Rheinberger 08

The Wulfenite specimen thus far produced in Australia are quite modest compared to Mexico and the USA and tend to be mostly micro crystals, though they have certainly produced some fine micro crystals.


Wulfenite
Austria

Franz Xaver von Wulfen (1728-1805)©

Wulfenite was named after Franz Xaver von Wulfen (1728-1805), Jesuit and mineralogist. He wrote the Book "Abhandlung vom kärnthnerischen Bleyspate", 1785, Vienna. At his honor the mineral Wulfenite was named. The picture of von Wulfen was taken from the book: Schroll, Erich (2008): Blei-Zink-Lagerstätte Bleiberg; die Geschichte ihrer Erforschung. - publishing Naturwissenschaftlicher Verein f. Kärnten, Austria (in german).


Wulfenite
Austria
Carinthia, Gailtaler Alpen & Karnische Alpen Mts, Bleiberg District, Bad Bleiberg, Stefanie Mine

Wulfenite, 12cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite, 6cm wide© Klehwa

Wulfenite, 7,5cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite, 6,5cm wide© Rudo

Wulfenite, 8cm© mineraliepietre
Wulfenite, 3.2cm wide© 0

Wulfenite, 2.5cm wide© Volker Betz
Wulfenite, 4.5cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts

Wulfenite, 8cm wide© Klehwa
Wulfenite, 4.5cm wide© 0

Wulfenite 12 cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite on Hydrozincite 15cm wide© Klehwa

Wulfenite 4,5 cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite 5cm wide © Rudo

Wulfenite on Barite 7cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite on Hemimorphite 6x6cm© R. Kofler

Wulfenite & Hemimorphite 5.5cm high© Rudo
Wulfenite on Hemimorphite 5cm wide© Rudo

Wulfenite & Hemimorphite 9cm wide© H. Prasnik & Rudo

Wulfenite 12cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite 12cm wide© Klehwa

Wulfenite 7cm wide© Rudo
Wulfenite 10cm wide © Klehwa

Wulfenite on Hydrozincite 13cm wide© Klehwa

Bad Bleiberg is the type locality of Wulfenite. Bad Bleiberg a village near Villach in Carinthia is very closely connected with the mineral Wulfenite as it was named after the Austrian Jesuit mineralogist and biologist Franz Xaver von Wulfen who had published the monograph "Abhandlung vom Kärnthnerischen Bleyspate" in 1785. In this book he mainly described the specimens collected at Bleiberg. He already was fascinated by the bright colors and perfectly shaped crystals.

There has been a very long mining tradition reaching back to ancient times at Bleiberg until in 1993 the mine had to be closed because of the falling prizes for zinc and lead. Together with the inhabitants of the village many collectors were very disappointed as there had been hope that the marvelous finds of the 2 last decades could be topped. Reason for this was the circumstance that the deeper the Stefanie shaft was driven the better and larger the crystals were which the face workers brought out. The largest thin plated crystals measured incredible 10 centimeters on an edge. At the 13th level of Stefanie Mine which was 695 meters below the surface the very best specimens could be found in the years between 1982 and 1987. The good quality of the minerals especially Wulfenite encouraged the BBU (Mining Company) to let one miner just concentrate on rescuing these treasures. In this time collectors were able to buy minerals at the Mining Company's Directory. But although some enormous Wulfenite pockets were opened perfect pieces still were very rare and not easy to get. The most striking pieces were those found between 12th and 13th level in yellow to orange color with a brilliance which in Europe never had been seen before. A great find also was the man-sized pocket with the green Wulfenites in 1986. Today the mine below the 5th level is flooded so the probably very best Wulfenites are preserved for the next generations.
[Rudolf Hasler 2012]

The Stefanie Mine is also the type locality for Hydrozincite and Ilsemannite. Bleiberg is the largest Lead/Zinc deposit in Alpine Europe and at the time of its closure having produced an estimated 1.1 mil. tons Pb, 1.1 mil. tons Zn, 993 tons Cd, 172 tons Ge and 500 tons Mo with remaining reserves of ~1.3 million tons of metal. The Triassic ore bodies are situated in limestones of somewhat different ages. The origin of the ore is not clear, but is thought to be 100% epigenetic. During the orogenesis of the alps the orebody was modified. The beautiful Wulfenite, Vanadinite etc, are the result of oxidation of the primary sulfides. The oxidation zone of the deposit extends as deep at 700 meters below the surface. There is a museum which can be visited in one of the adits of the mine.
[Martin Rich 2012]


Wulfenite
Austria
Carinthia, Gailtaler Alpen & Karnische Alpen Mts, Bleiberg District, Heiligengeist, Franz Josef Mine

Wulfenite 13cm wide© H. Prasnik
Wulfenite FOV 6cm wide© H. Prasnik

Wulfenite, 12.5cm wide©
Wulfenite FOV 12x9cm© Rudo


Wulfenite
Austria
Carinthia, Gailtaler Alpen & Karnische Alpen Mts, Bleiberg District, Heiligengeist, Kadutschen, Alt-Stefanie Mine (dump)

Wulfenite 13cm wide©
Wulfenite FOV 9cm©


Wulfenite
Austria
Carinthia, Gailtaler Alpen & Karnische Alpen Mts, Kötschach-Mauthen, Dellach, Jaukenhöhe Mt.

Wulfenite, 2.3cm wide© 0
Wulfenite, FOV 1.1cm© 0


Wulfenite
Austria
Carinthia, Karawanken Mts, Hochobir Mt., Zauchen, Schäffler Alp District

Wulfenite, xls ~.7mm© 0

Wulfenite
Belgium
Luxembourg Province, Stavelot Massif, Vielsalm, Cahai (Cahay), Tier des Carrières

Wulfenite, FOV 1mm© JDehove
Wulfenite, FOV 1mm© JDehove

Certainly not great wulfenite specimens, but the white one is quite unusual, but I think that pure lead molybdate should be white if pure. Also, whou would have thought that Belgium would have any Wulfenites at all?
[edit Harjo: Apart from the Stavelot massif Wulfenite has been found in the Quartz veins around Bastogne and Bertrix as well as Richelle]


Wulfenite
Chile
Antofagasta Region, Tocopilla Province, Tocopilla District, Santa Ana Mine (Chapacase Mine)

Wulfenite 9.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Wulfenite
Chile
Atacama Region, Copiapó Province, Cachiyuyo de Llampos district, Dulcinea de Llampos Mine

Wulfenite & Mimetite, FOV 4mm© A. Bleeker


Chile has produced little in the way of Wulfenite specimens. Mostly micro material and perhaps the largest crystals are in the cm range.


Wulfenite
China
Sichuan

Wulfenite, 5.5cm© Crystal Classics



Wulfenite
China
Sichuan Province, Liangshan Autonomous Prefecture, Mianning Co., Maoniuping REE deposit

Wulfenite on Barite, 3.9cm wide© fabreminerals.com

wulfenite, FOV 1.1mm© Dick Dionne
Wulfenite on Barite, FOV 1cm© Brian Ahola


Wulfenite
China
Xinjiang (Xinjiang-Uygur) Autonomous Region, Bayin'gholin (Bayingolin; Bayinguoleng) Autonomous Prefecture, Ruoqiang (Qakilik; Chaqiliq) Co., Jianshan Mine

Wulfenite, 7.6 cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 5.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 8.4 cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 5.8 cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 5.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 8.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 4.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 4.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 1.4cm© Sapphirious
Wulfenite, 5.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 9.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

China has only recently begun to produce specimens of Wulfenite, but from the pictures shown here you can easily understand why most collectors would like to have one in their collection. The demand for these is greater than the supply.


Wulfenite
Czech Republic
Bohemia (Böhmen; Boehmen), Ústí Region, Krušné Hory Mts (Erzgebirge), Krupka (Graupen), Barbora adit, Knöttel (Knötel; Knödel) area

Wulfenite, 1.5mm© Petr Fuchs



Wulfenite
Democratic Republic of Congo (Zaïre)
Katanga (Shaba), Katanga Copper Crescent, Central area, Shinkolobwe, Shinkolobwe Mine (Kasolo Mine)

Wulfenite & Uranophane, FOV 2mm© Elmar Lackner 2009


So far the only crystals that have been produced by the mines of the Democratic Republic of the Congo are micromounts, but their association with nice crystals of various uranium minerals makes them popular with micromount collectors, if they can get one. Though it is not likely, one wonders if radiation can turn wulfenite black as it does most Quartz crystals.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
Democratic Republic of Congo (Zaïre)
Katanga (Shaba), Katanga Copper Crescent, Western area, Kolwezi, Musonoi Mine

Wulfenite, Kasolite etc. FOV 3mm© JM. Johannet
Wulfenite, Kasolite etc. FOV 4mm© Stephan Wolfsried

Wulfenite xl .8mm on Malachite© Brent Thorne



Wulfenite
France
Rhône-Alpes, Ardèche, Ste Marguerite Lafigère, Rouvière mine

Wulfenite xl. 4mm with Anglesite© Pierre Houssin



Wulfenite
France
Rhône-Alpes, Rhône, Lantignié, Monterniers Mines

Wulfenite, 9.7cm tall© G,De'Young
Wulfenite on Mimetite, 2cm wide© Yannick Vessely

Wulfenite on Barite ~6cm wide© D.Steiner
Wulfenite xls, 6mm wide© DR

Wulfenite crystal 0,8cm© Georges BRET
Wulfenite xl. 1mm & Mimetite© Yannick Vessely


Wulfenite
Germany
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Wolfach, Oberwolfach, Rankach valley, Clara Mine

Wulfenite, Pyromorphite FOV 3mm© Stephan Wolfsried
Wulfenite FOV 1,5mm© 2006 D. Schläfli


Wulfenite
Greece
Attikí (Attica; Attika) Prefecture, Lavrion (Laurion; Laurium) District, Lavrion District Mines, Plaka

Wulfenite ~5.2cm wide© Jasun McAvoy
Wulfenite xl. 1.2mm wide© D. Preite


Wulfenite
Greece
Attikí (Attica; Attika) Prefecture, Lavrion (Laurion; Laurium) District, Lavrion District Mines, Plaka, Plaka Mines, Adami No. 02 Mine ("Adayir" Mine) & Others

Wulfenite, 5.5cm wide© Colleen Thomson
Wulfenite 1cm wide©


Wulfenite
Greece
Attikí (Attica; Attika) Prefecture, Lavrion (Laurion; Laurium) District, Lavrion District Mines, Plaka, Plaka Mine No. 80, Plaka Mines

Wulfenite on Mimetite, FOV 1.2 cm© 2005 M. Kampf



Wulfenite
Iran
Esfahan Province (Isfahan Province; Aspadana Province), Anarak District, Chah Kharboze (Tchah-Kharboze),Chah Kharboze Mine (Tchah-Kharboze Mine; Chah-Karbuzeh Mine)

This is the best locality in Iran for Wulfenite. It is a small mine and at one time Wulfenite crystals were the main ore of the mine and I was told that women used to gather the crystals in baskets to take to the smelter. In the 70s I went to the mine site and though it had been abandoned for a number of years, one could see countless tiny shards of red Wulfenite crystals in the soil at the mine site. I have never seen a crystal from here even as large as one inch, but the crystals were almost all a very intense red color. Not many specimens were saved. At least one group of German collectors made a trip to the mine and collected there before the lower level where the best crystals were found were flooded. Perhaps one of them will tell us the story about their collecting trip there.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
Iran
Esfahan Province (Isfahan Province; Aspadana Province), Anarak District

Wulfenite, 8mm wide© 2007 D. Schläfli
Wulfenite xl. .6mm wide© R.D.Green



Wulfenite
Iran
Esfahan Province (Isfahan Province; Aspadana Province), Anarak District, Madan-e Nakhlak (Ma'dan-e-Nahlak), Nakhlak Mine (Nekhlak Mine)

Wulfenite, Cerussite 16cm© Vachik Hairapetian May 2006
Wulfenite xls. 4mm on Cerussite© Maziar Nazari


Not a prolific mine for wulfenite and most of the crystals from here are micros growing on cerussite. At the time of my visit I saw one crack running up out of the sight of my mine lamp lined with one to two cm burrs of reticulated cerussite, many of which had micro Wulfenites growing on them. The rocks on the floor of the stope were about 10% crushed cerussite crystals.
[Rock Currier 2012]


Wulfenite
Italy
Lombardy, Bergamo Province, Seriana Valley, Riso Valley, Oneta

Wulfenite, large xl. 1.2cm© gianniperacchi
Wulfenite, 9cm© gianniperacchi

Wulfenite, largest xl. 1cm© gianniperacchi
Wulfenite xl. 4.3mm© Enrico Bonacina


Wulfenite
Italy
Lombardy, Lecco Province, Abbadia Lariana, Linzanico, Monastero Valley, Cascina Mugarola, "Delle Grigne" Lead Mine

Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Marco Macchieraldo



Wulfenite
Italy
Piedmont, Biella Province, Cervo Valley, Quittengo, Le Forche

Wulfenite, 1mm© Luigi Mattei



Wulfenite
Mexico
Chihuahua, Mun. de Ahumada, Los Lamentos Mts (Sierra de Los Lamentos)

Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 2cm wide© Michael C. Roarke

Wulfenite, 5.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 3.8cm wide© Kristalle and Crys

Wulfenite, 4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

18cm wide© www.exceptionalminerals.com
Wulfenite ~6cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich

Wulfenite6.3cm© fabreminerals.com
Wulfenite, 7.2cm© www.exceptionalminerals.com

wulfenite, 4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 3.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, Calcite 5.8cm© fabreminerals.com
Wulfenite, 4.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 8.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 7.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 6.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 4.4cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Wulfenite, 8.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

This mine is thought by many collectors to have produced the best specimens of Wulfenite of any mine in Mexico, but some think the San Francisco mine produced as good or better specimens. Many of the specimens from the mine were characterized by block orange crystals that have been likened to chunks of caramel candy. Some specimens were more than a foot across. Specimens from this mine were collected and sold to collectors for many years. For many years in the 50 and 60s collectors from the United States, possibly most California and Arizona made collecting trips to this mine and returned with hundreds of specimens that were sold and traded all over the world. Today, even good small specimens from this locality can rarely be found for less than $1000. Crystals rarely exceeded two inches and most of the fine specimens have crystals that are much smaller. As you can see from the pictures above that many different kinds of Wulfenite crystals were produced at this mine.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Wulfenite
Mexico
Durango, Mun. de Mapimí, Mapimí, Ojuela Mine

Wulfenite, 8.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 5.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Mimetite, 6.7cm© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 6.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite on Mimetite, 5.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
4.6cm© fabreminerals.com

Wulfenite xl. 5mm, Calcite, Mimetite©
Wulfenite on Mimetite, 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

4cm© fabreminerals.com
Wulfenite & Mimetite, 3.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite on Mimetite, 3cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Wulfenite, FOV 1.5mm© A. Bleeker

Wulfenite & Mimetite, FOV 1.7mm© A. Bleeker
Wulfenite xl. 3mm & Mimetite© Chinellato Matteo

For most of its productive life, the Ojuela mine was better know for Mimetite, Legrandite and Adamite specimens rather than Wulfenite. Most of the Wulfenite produced in the 20th century were limited to very thin yellow and often rather transparent Wulfenite crystals, often in the cm size range, frequently associate with a light green Mimetite. Recently however, a small number of miners/collectors from the nearby town of Mapimi have gone into the old workings and have collected considerable numbers of strikingly good specimens of prismatic pyramidal orange Wulfenite crystals, many of them growing with and on dark green Mimetite. Hundreds of specimens have been produced, and some of the better ones are shown above.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
Mexico
Sonora, Mun. de Cucurpe, Cucurpe, Cerro Prieto, San Francisco Mine (Cerro Prieto Mine)

Wulfenite on Mimetite, 4.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Mimetite 3.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite & Mimetite, 4cm wide© Mike Hopkins
Wulfenite ~5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich

Wulfenite, Mimetite, 4cm© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite & Barite, 6cm wide© Michael Shaw

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

In the last part of the 20th century, this mine was exploited by a number of groups of collectors to produce many fine specimens of Wulfenite. The crystals from this mine were almost always thin and delicate and sometimes associated with little red balls of Mimetite which made them particularly attractive to collectors. Today a fine example of Wulfenites form this mine will bring thousands of dollars. Because the Wulfenite crystals from this mine are so delicate, many of the specimens have become chipped and broken.


Wulfenite
Mexico
Sonora, Mun. de Rayón, Rayón, Socorro Mine

Wulfenite on Mimetite, 9.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Wulfenite
Morocco
Meknès-Tafilalet Region, Khénifra Province, Midelt, Upper Moulouya lead district, Mibladene (Mibladén; Mibladan; Miblanden)

Wulfenite, 4.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 7.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Wulfenite
Morocco
Oriental Region, Oujda-Angad Province, Touissit District

Wulfenite & Dolomite, 4.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Dolomite, 5.5cm wide© Eric Graff

Wulfenite, 10cm wide© R. Lang 2004
Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Greg Murray

Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© Kristalle and CC
Wulfenite, 6cm© CCURTO2008


Wulfenite
Namibia
Otjikoto (Oshikoto) Region, Tsumeb, Tsumeb Mine (Tsumcorp Mine)

6cm© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Dolomite, 10cm© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite on Dioptase, 4.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, Dioptase 1.7cm© Kristalle and Crys

Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Dolomite, 8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Wulfenite, 4.2 cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3.5cm tall© 2002 John H. Betts
Wulfenite, 4cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, Dolomite, 5.8cm© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite & Mimetite, 3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts

Wulfenite, 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Dolomite, 4.8cm wide© JSS

The mine at Tsumeb is not particularly known for its Wulfenite specimens, but it has produced some good ones, as you can see from the above images. Perhaps the most striking thing about the Wulfenite specimens from Tsumeb is the large number of different kinds of crystals that it has produced. Usually the pockets with Wulfenite specimens that are found are all different from each other and the pockets were always small and in most cases did not produce more than a few flats of specimens. One pocket of wulfenite was opened where crystals up to 60cm were found. They were very delicate and most if not all of these big crystals were heavily damaged as specimens were removed from the pocket.


Wulfenite
Congo, Republic of (Brazzaville)
Kouilou Region, Mvouti Prefecture, Mvouti (M'Fouati)

Wulfenite, 1.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 11cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

This locality may have produced the largest Wulfenites in terms of wight. The 11 cm one pictured above is not particularly attractive but it does weigh 1.6kgs and may be the largest wulfenite known by weight.


Wulfenite
Slovenia
Mežica (Miess)

Wulfenite, 8.1cm wide© Collectors Edge
Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The Wulfenite specimens from Miess have been known for perhaps 100 years and at times have been abundant. We need someone more familiar than I with these specimens to tell us about them.


Wulfenite
Sloveina
Mežica (Miess), Črna (Schwarzenbach), Helena Mine

Wulfenite, 4cm wide© fabreminerals.com
Wulfenite, 6.8cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008

Wulfenite & Calcite, 2.5cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008
Wulfenite, 8.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite & Calcite, 4cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008
Wulfenite, 4cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008

Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Peter Haas
Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© Tony Peterson


Wulfenite
Slovenia
Mežica (Miess), Mežica Mine

Wulfenite, 6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite 4cm wide© 2002 Thames Valley Minerals


Wulfenite
Slovenia
Mežica (Miess), Mežica Mine

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Dan Weinrich Minerals



Wulfenite
Slovenia
Mežica (Miess), Staro Igrčevo Mine

Wulfenite, 2.1cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008

Wulfenite, 1.1cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008
Wulfenite, 2.5cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008


Wulfenite
Slovenia
Mežica (Miess), Union Mine

Wulfenite, 40cm wide/25kg© I. Dolinar 2009

Wulfenite, 4.6cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008
Wulfenite, 2.5cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008

Wulfenite, 2cm wide© I. Dolinar 2008
Wulfenite, 6cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Wulfenite
Spain
Andalusia, Granada, Albuñuelas, Barranco del Humo mines (Cortijo del Humo mines)

Wulfenite, 16x14cm© Harjo
Wulfenite, 6x3,5cm© Harjo

Wulfenite, 14cm© Harjo
Wulfenite fov 0,8cm© Harjo

Wulfenite fov 0,8cm© Harjo
Wulfenite fov 1cm© Harjo


Wulfenite
Spain
Andalusia, Granada, Albuñuelas, Los Lastonares mines

Wulfenite, 6,2x3,4cm© fabreminerals.com
Wulfenite fov 0,3cm© Christian Rewitzer

Several mines near the town of Albuñuelas, about one hour south of Granada, were mined for Galena from the 19th century up to their closure in the 1920s. During the war interest in the mines revived because the Molybdenum that was thrown on the dumps during the active mining period was in demand for the industry. Therefore hardly any dumps are visible and collecting is best done inside the mine. [personal info Paco Lopez]
Very nice specimens have come out of the mines, Wulfenite in a variety of colours (brown, red, orange, yellow, green, gray, colourless) and a wide range of different forms.
Individual crystals can get up to about 1 cm and large cabinet specimens have been found.
The names of the individual mines in the area are: Barranco del Humo mines (Cortijo del Humo mines), Cerro de la Cruz mine, Cerro de la Jara mine, Cerro del Capón mines, Cortijo del Cura mine, El Centenillo mine, La Cunilla mine (El Cuco mine), Laura mine, Los Lastonares mine and San Antonio de Padua mine.


Wulfenite (Var: Chillagite)
Spain
Catalonia, Barcelona, Vallès Oriental, Sant Fost de Campsentelles, Teresita mine

Chillagite, 2,3x2,1cm© fabreminerals.com
Chillagite, 4,2x3,4cm© fabreminerals.com

Classic Spanish locality for the Tungstenian variety of Wulfenite, Chillagite.


Wulfenite
USA
Cochise Co., Chiricahua Mts, California District, Rustler Park, Hilltop Mine (Hand Mine; Kasper tunnel; Gray Mine; Dunn shaft; Blacksmith shaft; Rhem adit)

Wulfenite, 6.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Dragoon Mts, Turquoise District (Courtland-Gleeson District), Gleeson, Costello Mine group (Costello claims), Defiance Mine

Wulfenite & Calcite, 8.5cm wide© Michael Shaw
Wulfenite, 4.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 7.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 9.3cm wide© John Sobolewski

Wulfenite, 9.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
wulfenite, 3cm wide© 2008 Michael C. Roarke

Wulfenite, 3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite ~10cm tall© Alan Goldstein

Wulfenite, 10cm wide©
Wulfenite, 6.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The specimens from this mine at one time were abundant, but because of their delicate nature, many of them have been damaged or destroyed. Many of the specimens from this mine are instantly recognizable by their pagoda shaped crystals. Many of the specimens were found with tiny white calcite crystals growing on the tops of the Wulfenite crystals. Many specimens have had the calcite crystals removed to better show the Wulfenite. Some crystals are a rather brown color and others grade almost to a shiny orange color. Of course the brighter colors are worth more to collectors.


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Dragoon Mts, Turquoise District (Courtland-Gleeson District), Gleeson, Costello Mine group (Costello claims), Silver Bill Mine

Wulfenite, 2.2cm tall© fabreminerals.com



Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Dragoon Mts, Turquoise District (Courtland-Gleeson District), Gleeson, Mystery Mine (Mystery Tunnel Mine; Minerals Exploration Co. property)

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© Greg Murray



Wulfenite
USA
Cochise Co., Tombstone Hills, Tombstone District, Tombstone, Toughnut Mine (Tough Nut Mine; Northwest Mine; Hoodoo stopes; Tombstone group)

Wulfenite, 3.5cm wide© WS-08



Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Dripping Spring Mts, Banner District, Hayden area, Chilito, 79 Mine (79th Mine; Seventy-Nine Mine; Seventy-Nine property; McHur prospect)

Wulfenite, 2.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite on Aurichalcite, 5.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 2.3cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
Wulfenite, 1.2cm wide© Michael Cline

Wulfenite, 2.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 2.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3.3cm wide© Ron Gyllenhammer
Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Dan Weinrich

This mine produced a lot of Wulfenite specimens, but few of them were good. The most attractive of them were the thin yellow crystals growing on a black matrix. Most of these specimens were small.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Dripping Spring Mts, Banner District, Hayden area, Chilito, Keystone Gulch, Finch Mine (Barking Spider Mine), Reagan claims (Regan/Reagan Camp prospects; Lee Reagan property; Lee Reagan prospects; Kullman-McCool group)

Wulfenite & Quartz, 4.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite xls to .9cm under Quartz© Karl Volkman 2002



Wulfenite
USA
La Paz Co., Trigo Mts, Silver District, Pure Potential Mine (North Geronimo Mine)

Wulfenite, 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 4.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, xtl 1,7cm © Anton Watzl Jr.



Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Trigo Mts, Silver District, Red Cloud Mine

Wulfenite, largest xl.=1.9cm© Dan Weinrich
Wulfenite 2.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 3cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts
9mm wide Wulfenite on matrix© Chinellato Matteo

Wulfenite, 7cm wide© MikeHaritos
Wulfenite, 4.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 4.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite xls up to 2.5cm© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 6.3cm© Carles Millan
Wulfenite, 7.2cm wide© Edwards Minerals

The Red Cloud mine is famous among collectors for the beauty and quality of the red Wulfenite crystals that it produced. The specimens ere never abundant and you were lucky if you could come away after two or three days collecting in the mine with two or three flats of specimens, and these were with very rare exceptions never of the best quality. For years access to the mine was more or less unrestricted and the biggest worry was if your car could make it up the sandy road to the mine. Many collectors, myself included made many trips to the mine and never came away with a really fine specimen. The Red Cloud was a very small old silver mine and almost all the specimens produced from this mine were collected by collectors after the mine has ceased operation. It consisted of a steep incline and a vertical shaft. You could get down and up it without a rope, but almost all of us who collected in the mine used a rope to help navigate the incline. It went down perhaps 150 feet to a haulage level that intersected with the bottom of the shaft. The incline continued even more steeply below the haulage level, but after a fire burnt out the wooden ladder that led to the lower level, few collectors bothered to access this part of the mine. There was little incentive to go there because almost all of the good Wulfenite specimens were to be found in the stopped areas of the vein above the haulage level. The mine was also known for how dirty it was. After collecting there for a day, you always came out impregnated with the fine red limonite dust that was everywhere in the mine. You would take off your shirt, and if you were wearing a white undershirt, the undershirt was pink. If you took off the undershirt as well, you skin was a light pink color. Sometimes it took several baths to remove this dust completely from your body and often for a day or two after, if you blew your nose, you could still see evidence of this fine red dust still in your system.

In the early part of the 20th century crystals were supplied to Wards Natural History establishment, but the first find of really good specimen, and some collectors still say the best were collected by the legendary field collector Ed Over in 1938. They were sold mostly back east by his partner Arthur Montgomery. The letters that Ed Over wrote to Arthur Montgomery about the find have been published in the Mineralogical record and they are the stuff of collecting legends. Some of the crystals he found were about two inches across, and some of the best ones, which Arthur kept in his collection will be shown above as soon as I can get my slide scanner up and running again. Other fine specimens were recovered when the main vein at the deposit was open pitted by a group of collectors and a number of fine specimens were produced from several small narrow pockets of less than 2 meters in length. "On the 9th (of February) I tried another brecciated seam that has pocketed three times... each pocket has been bigger and better. I can't compare this stuff with anything I've seen before...But I will say that these single crystals , clusters and groups are the finest wulfenite I've ever seen...the Pocket bottoms are covered with loose crystals...I think this seam is one in a million. I am shipping 8 boxes, 6 1/2 are from this place. P.S. Note large rose shaped cluster of crystals especially."1 Today any of the better specimens would bring thousands of dollars each and some specimens would probably sell for more than $100,000. From the second find of good specimens that was mined by Wayne Thompson's group in 1973 when they open pitted the vein, I even broke down and paid several thousand dollars for a decent, specimen from this find. It was not one of the best ones, but I knew that this would be probably my last change to get a good Wulfenite from this mine and after spending more than 100 hours collecting in the dirty old hole, I wanted a good one.
1, Mineralogical Record, Vol. 11, #3, May-June 1980: The Red Cloud Mine, Gary M. Edison, p141 to 152.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Maricopa Co., Painted Rock Mts, Painted Rock District, Theba, Rowley Mine (Rawley Mine; Reliance Mine; Reliance Copper Mine; Rainbow Mine; Theba Mine; San Carlos patented claim #4524)

Wulfenite, 4cm wide© Michael Shaw

Wulfenite & Mimetite, 2cm wide© Michael C. Roarke
Wulfenite & Mimetite, 4cm wide©

Wulfenite on Barite, 8cm wide© Anton Watzl Sr.
Wulfenite on Barite, 4.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 8.8cm wide© D. Richerson
Wulfenite on Barite, 5cm© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 2cm wide© C. Stefano '09
Wulfenite, Mimetite 2.7cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich

The Rawley mine was accessible to collectors for years by collectors and at one time it was difficult to find a field collector who had not visited the mine at least once. Wulfenite was an abundant mineral in the mine, but you rarely good a good specimens from there. They were characterized by being small crystals, usually growing on Baryte, but very clear and delicate. You usually came away with several flats of specimens but rarely anything very good. It was a small mine and accessed by a fairly large incline shaft. I nearly got squashed by a big boulder that fell from the ceiling less than six inches from where I was standing. I don't go back to collect there after that.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Pima Co., Tucson Mts, Amole District, Saguaro National Monument, Old Yuma Mine (Yuma Mine)

Wulfenite, 2.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 2.1cm wide© Michael Cline

The Old Yuma Mine is located right on in the outskirts of Tucson and many years after it stopped production, the property was purchased by Dick Bideaux who could never get permission to open it up and collect in a part of the mine what was productive of specimens. He did so in his youth, and wanted to do so again, but was never able to. He fought with the government for years to patent the claim and in the end sold it to the government for a good price. We need someone like Gene Schlep who is still with us to tell us about the mine and the specimens it produced.


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Mammoth District, Tiger, St. Anthony deposit, Mammoth-Saint Anthony Mine (Mammoth-St Anthony Mine; Mammoth Mine; St. Anthony Mine)

Wulfenite, 6cm© Dan Evanich and Calminco.com
Wulfenite & Mimetite, 12.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, Dioptase FOV 4.5cm© Jasun McAvoy
Wulfenite & Dioptase, 5.5cm© Edwards Minerals

Tiger produced some good Wulfenite specimens, but they are quite delicate and you rarely see one today. In the early days, before it was called Tiger, the locality was generally know as Schulz, Arizona. The mine at that time produced some nice specimens of bladed orange Wulfenite that has a sort of smoky orange color. A fine example of this king is in the collection of Harvard University.
[Rock Currier]


Wulfenite
USA
Arizona, Santa Cruz Co., Santa Rita Mts, Tyndall District, Cottonwood Canyon, Amado, Devil's Cash Box ridge, Glove Mine (Sunrise Mine), Glove Mine group (Zombie & Zeco claims; Festiago-Franklin; Blacksmith adit)

Wulfenite, 8cm tall© 2002 John H. Betts
Wulfenite, 5.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 7.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite, 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 2.9cm wide© WS-09
Wulfenite on Psilomelane, 3cm wide© WS-09

Wulfenite, Psilomelane 8cm© 2002 John H. Betts
Wulfenite & Calcite, 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

This mine produced a large variety of Wulfenite specimens, but the specimens from this mine are dominated by specimens from a huge pocket of bladed curved brown/orange crystals that were dug by Al Haag and Dick Bideaux in the late 50s. When a "cave" full of Wulfenite was encountered at the mine, a deal was struck with the mining company to collect the specimens. Dick said they could collect the specimens as long as they did not disrupt the mining process. He told of walking on a mine tunnel that was covered with Wulfenite crystals that would crunch beneath his boots and laying in part of the pocket, collecting and handing out specimens as the miners were drilling holes near his feet to prepare for a blast that would destroy the specimens in that huge pocket of Wulfenite. He had to place some canvas in the bottom of the pocket to keep the sharp thin Wulfenite crystals from cutting his back. Several hundred good specimens were collected, but you rarely see them offered for sale today. Dick told me that the largest crystals from this mine measured about 11cm across.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Wulfenite
United States
California, Inyo County, Darwin, 1208 oxide stope

Wulfenite, 8.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Wulfenite largest xl 0.3mm© Chris Tucker

The best wulfenite from Darwin was found in the roof at the far end of the 1208 stope in 1973. Most of the little orange crystals found here were less than 5 mm but some were as large as 12 mm and most of these larger crystals were not particularly attractive. Most of the specimens were clusters of wall to wall small bright orange crystals. Most of the specimens were collected by Wolfgang Mueller during one evenings collecting. He collected about 15 flats of specimens of various qualities. The best specimen is a matrix specimen 10 x 15 cm tapering to a point on one in with excellent coverage of the small crystals which are associated with micro prismatic orange, mimetite crystals which are not evident until you look closely for them. Some of the better specimens sold for as much as $400. The best specimen was available for the price of a new Chevrolet Blazer and may still be1
1. Personal communication, Wolfgang Mueller 2000 aprox.
[Rock Currier 6 November 08]


Wulfenite
USA
Montana, Broadwater Co., Radersburg District (Cedar Plains District; Lone Mountain District), James R. Lee Mine

Wulfenite, 5.5cm wide© Chris Tucker
Wulfenite, 4cm tall© Chris Tucker


Wulfenite
USA
Montana, Madison Co., Silver Star District, Silver Star, Broadway Mine (Victoria Mine; Bowery; Delaware)

Wulfenite ~5cm wide© Chris Tucker
Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Chris Tucker


Wulfenite
USA
New Mexico, Doña Ana Co., Organ District, Stevenson-Bennett Mine (Stephenson-Bennett Mine)

Wulfenite, 4cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
Wulfenite, 5.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Wulfenite, 4.3cm wide© 2004 Mark Massis
Wulfenite, 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Wulfenite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Burro Mountains District, Tyrone Area, Tyrone Mine

Wulfenite, 3cm© Arliguie M



Wulfenite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Central District, Vanadium, Groundhog Mine, Lucky Bill Mine (Lucky Bill shaft)

Wulfenite ~6cm wide© 2008 Peter Cristofono



Wulfenite
USA
Pennsylvania, Chester Co.Schuylkill Township, Phoenixville Mining District, Wheatley Mines

Wulfenite, Pyromorphite 12cm© 2007 Peter Cristofono
Wulfenite, 4cm wide© M.Heintzelman

The mine is much better know for its Pyromorphite crystals but I thought I would throw in a couple of pictures of the Wulfenite crystals from this famous old mine just to put thing in perspective. They rarely got to be larger than a mm or two.


Wulfenite
USA
Utah, Beaver Co., Star Range, Star and North Star Districts, Milford, Harrington-Hickory Mine (Rocky; The Gomer Shaft)

Wulfenite, 4.5cm wide© Rockpick Legend Co.



Wulfenite
USA
Utah, Box Elder Co., Pilot Range, Lucin District, Tecoma Hill Mines

Wulfenite, 6.5cm© Chris Tucker



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Edited 210 time(s). Last edit at 11/19/2014 01:10PM by Rudolf Hasler.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 12:25PM
    
Rock,

I really liked the beginning of this article, good choice of photo to start it off with :) I noticed in the main paragraph a couple of spelling & grammar mistakes, I've copied the paragraph below, highlighted & underlined these with my changes so that you can compare easily & edit, should you want to ... Also at the same time you might want to edit "Mvouti (M'Fouati), Mvouti Prefecture, Kouilou Region, Republic of Congo (Brazzaville)" as it is currently situated under Tsumeb, Namibia. One final point, at this stage are we supposed to be reading/seeing all the html codes for the links to display the selected photos ?

Mindat currently lists about 1300 localities for wulfenite, but only a tiny fraction of those localities produce crystals that are of interest to collectors. There may be something like a dozen localities that have produced really fine specimens and of those, the crystals from the Red Cloud Mine in Arizona, USA are perhaps the most highly regarded by collectors. For some reason, many of the good wulfenite producing localities are found in Southern Arizona, and Northern Mexico. Why they should have been concentrated here is open to speculation. It is not a robust mineral, and if you have specimens of it, you should treat them gently, for many of them are quite fragile. Perhaps the most robust of them are the highly regarded blocky orange crystals from Los Laments, Mexico. Which are really the best? Well you will have to look at the eye candy below and make up your own mind. Keep in mind that the pictures shown are only of specimens that have been uploaded to the mindat image gallery and there are in many cases better specimens lurking out there. The largest size for Wulfenite is listed as 11cm in the Handbook of Mineralogy. Dick Bideaux the principal author of this work had a substantial interest in wulfenite and though he does not say which locality produced the 11 cm crystal I suspect that it was from the Glove mine in Arizona. I also think that crystals this large and larger have been produced at Mvouti (M'Fouati), Mvouti Prefecture, Kouilou Region, Republic of Congo (Brazzaville)

;)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 01:38PM
I hope my addition to this subject will be as worthy of some of the others. I have only been collecting since January of 2008 and have only collected at one Wulfenite location. The Loudville Lead Mines in Southampton MA, Hampshire County, a New England classic dating back to the mid 1700's. This location is presently in the care of the New England Forestry Foundation. I have four different Wulfenite habits from this location of which a couple are very special to me, ok I’ll be honest, they are all special to me. This is the first Wulfenite specimen that I collected from this location in 2008. Clean, well formed .5mm to 2mm Wulfenite tabs, with Pyromorphite on Quartz. You can imagine my excitement as a new collector to find this specimen. This is a link to the Location [www.mindat.org]
Edit Reply Quote Report
Attachments:
open | download - Loudville Rock 001.jpg (42.5 KB)
open | download - Loudville Rock 004.jpg (54.5 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 01:44PM
I hope my addition to this subject will be as worthy of some of the others. I have only been collecting since January of 2008 and have only collected at one Wulfenite location. The Loudville Lead Mines in Southampton MA, Hampshire County, a New England classic dating back to the mid 1700's. This location is presently in the care of the New England Forestry Foundation. I have four different Wulfenite habits from this location of which a couple are very special to me, ok I’ll be honest, they are all special to me. This is the first Wulfenite specimen that I collected from this location in 2008. Clean, well formed .5mm to 2mm Wulfenite tabs, with Pyromorphite on Quartz. You can imagine my excitement as a new collector to find this specimen. This is a link to the Location [www.mindat.org]
Attachments:
open | download - Loudville Rock 001.jpg (42.5 KB)
open | download - Loudville Rock 004.jpg (54.5 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 01:48PM
    
Rock, I found it!!!!!!
I bet you've been looking for the reason why all the links and photos after the Chilean photo didn't show properly.....well, it was one (!) space after an "=" before a photo id number in the Chilean Wulf's link.
Now it runs OK

Cheers

Harjo
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 01:54PM
This is the second Wulfenite specimen from this location. They are double terminated, bi-pyramidal Wulfenite, not very colorful but interesting none the less. I thought they were something organic when I found them, but with being a newbie, if it's different it comes home and gets cleaned and checked out, glad I did! They are1 to 2mm in length and the over all specimen is about 5 cm.
Attachments:
open | download - Rocks 031e.jpg (838.6 KB)
open | download - Pyramidal Wulfenite-Loudville 001.jpg (848.3 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 02:02PM
The third specimen from Loudville resembles a Garnet more than the normal Wulfenite from here. This is the only one of this habit that I have found so far. The color is very rich and lusterous, and the largest xl is about 2.5mm.
Attachments:
open | download - Loudville 09-1 001.jpg (734 KB)
open | download - Loudville 09-1 002.jpg (578.8 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 02:18PM
This Wulfenite specimen has a special story to go along with it and it's size is what makes it such a spectacular find. This is a 6mm Wulfenite floater in a vug from Loudville. The xl was loose in the vug when i found it with only the clay mud keeping it in it's home. I was showing some friends from the RI Mineral Hunters club the site for the first time. I bent down and picked up a rock to show them what they should be looking for and there it was!!! I said" this is what you are looking for and...this one is mine!" This specimen was laying on the edge of a hole that had been dug a week or so before this trip, I can't imagine what the people were looking for but they missed a beauty!! I haven't tried cleaning this specimen yet and I'm not sure if the xl is broken or just loose in the vug. There may be another xl that size with it, but can't tell yet. The dried mud has it secure for now until I have a chance to investigate. The size of 6mm is huge for this location and is a special addition to my collection.
Attachments:
open | download - Loudville yesterday 004.jpg (59.3 KB)
open | download - Loudville yesterday 003.jpg (54.4 KB)
open | download - Loudville yesterday 005.jpg (64.6 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 02:36PM
This is a rare and unusual Wulfenite specimen from Loudville. My 7 year old daughter found the first one and all because she liked the terminated Quartz that they were on. We were collecting together as she is my usual collecting partner. She picked up a piece of rock with a Quartz xl coating on one side, she wanted to bring home the part with the terminated xl's on it and said she was going to trim off the host rock so it wouldn't be so heavy. I said ok and went on with my own collecting not expecting she had anything more than Quartz on her hands. I heard her whacking away at it and she asked me to take a look at her handy work. I took the piece for a closer look and knew she had something special just couldn't tell what. I could only see the color but no xl shape at that point with the naked eye. I said "Lynsey, don't hit this any more" I can't imagine how may she destroyed from the specimen but we have some nice ones from it anyway. We have found about 7 specimens of this habit so far and they are our favorite from this location so far. The xl's are about .5 to 1.5 mm in size, and they are double terminated, bi-pyramidal, pseudo octahedral Wulfenites and were identified by a close friend Steve Garza.
Attachments:
open | download - Lynsey\'s wulfs from Sat. 001.jpg (53.6 KB)
open | download - Lynsey\'s wulfs from Sat. 002.jpg (52.5 KB)
open | download - Lynsey\'s Wulfs scope 001.jpg (35.8 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 02:40PM
These are better pictures of them, sorry about that last batch.
Attachments:
open | download - Lynsey\'s Wulfs scope 004.jpg (43.8 KB)
open | download - Lynsey\'s Wulfs scope 005.jpg (33 KB)
open | download - Lynsey\'s Wulfs scope 007.jpg (46.4 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 02:50PM
More specimens of the same habit, My 4-1/2 year old son Kyle handed me this one a week or so after my daughter found hers. I could see the xl shape with the naked eye on this one and the xl size is up to 2mm, I hope you can use these specimens in your project and would be thrilled to see ours in this thread. If you need anything different from me as far as pictures or anything please feel free to contact me. Respectfully, Andrew Brodeur
Attachments:
open | download - Loudville super Wulf 011.jpg (70.5 KB)
open | download - Loudville super Wulf 013.jpg (60 KB)
open | download - Loudville super Wulf 015.jpg (63.5 KB)
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 03:12PM
    
Thanks Debby, I edited the above..
Thanks Andrew for your help.
Rock, is it OK with you if I redesign the Stefanie Mine block of photos?

Cheers

Harjo
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 08, 2009 11:42PM
Harjo, by all means, go ahead and design away.

Andrew, I don't think your photos or the specimens they represent are the kind of things we want to show here in Best Minerals. For wulfenite, Loudville is just one of the 3000 or so minor localities for wulfeite that are known. Your pictures might find a home in the general wulfenite gallery for mindat and though I don't have much to do with accepting or rejecting images submitted to the general galleries, I think that some of them might even be rejected for that use and placed in your own user only gallery. The first step in having an image used in the Best Minerals articles is to upload it to mindat formerly and not just as an attachment to a thread posting. After that, if the person writing the article wants to use it, then it will be included. I know that right now you think these little wulfenites from Loudville are very impressive to you now, but wait 20 years and look at them again, and they will most likely not seem all that impressive. Like I said in the general forum I don't want to discourage you from your interest in minerals. Keep on going. Bigger and better things are waiting for you.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 09, 2009 12:52AM
WOW!
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 09, 2009 11:20AM
Andrew.

WOW what? Wow, what an uncaring brute I am in expressing my honest opinions? or WOW you are looking forward to Bigger and Better things?

Harjo, Yes, I have had a long and painful experience of leaving out a space or putting an extra one in where it should not be or getting a bracket reversed or missing, of a misspelling or a number of other things that screwing up the code string for bringing the images into these thread postings. Usually I clean them up before signing out. I had hoped to have gotten a lot more done on wulfenite this weekend than I did. Had an old mineral collecting friend stop in and spend the night. He was on his way back from field collecting over near the Arizona border. He is one of a group of very active and long experienced field collectors from the bay area and besides the opportunity to catch up on all the gossip I could not help but try and introduce him to the joys of Mindat and the Best Minerals project. You have to be a bit of a Tupperware salesman to interest people int he project. I find however that once they grasp the idea of what we are trying to do here, they become supporters if not enthusiastic supporters.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 10, 2009 10:55AM
Harjo,
I noticed you changed the image settings on a couple of the pictures from width to heights. As a result, the images were larger and of different widths. I have no objections to that, but I would like to know if you think the varying widths are more aesthetic that uniform widths. Just wondering.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 10, 2009 02:22PM
    
Hi Rock & Harjo,
IMHO it looks better if the heights are uniform rather than the width .... so i support Harjos settings change.

Here some pics from my gallery you might consider:
[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]

... great work as usual folks! ... hope to be back in the BOM work in December,

cheers
Roger
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 10, 2009 05:27PM
    
Rock, I think we should have the height between two adjacent pictures uniform, somehow it results in a more relaxed lay-out.
Different heights between adjacent images look a bit restless, I bet there's a psychological explanation for it grinning smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 11/10/2009 05:28PM by Harjo Neutkens.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 10, 2009 10:02PM
OK but just to be clear you mean adjacent to left and right or adjacent above and below? I agree with you on the same height from left to right and to a lesser extent on above and below. I think we may place a slightly different emphasis on constraining images to particular widths and heights. I think I may tolerate a slightly greater "chaos" in my arrangement of the pictures than you find congenial. Also I think on the average I use a few more images, sometimes quite a few more images to for a particular species from a locality than you do and with that diversity of images it takes a lot of arranging and moving them around relative to one another to make the widths and heights more or less match up. Once I have the general arrangement in place I then go in and tweak the widths and heights to to make them match as much as possible. I also try and take to account how large the specimens are and try and make that reflect in the size of the images I show as much as possible. If the specimen is a really big one, I don't like to make it the same size as a miniature, TN or micro specimen, but occasionally I am forced into doing that. I rationalize it by knowing that the size of the image is right in the caption for all to see.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Wulfenite
November 20, 2009 12:12PM
Roger,
Thanks, I did use one of your suggested images in those Wulfenites from Morocco. In general I rarely use images of specimens where a close up photo of only a portion of the specimen is shown. I think that most of the authors also prefer whole specimen images where possible.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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