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Calcite, USA, Alabama to Montana

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Calcite, USA, Alabama to Montana
April 06, 2009 07:01AM
Click here to view Best Minerals, Calcite, Nevada to Wyoming, click here to view Best Minerals Calcite and here to view Best Minerals C and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.


Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?


Calcite
CaCO3 trigonal

Calcite, Elmwood, Tennessee, USA 10.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Copper in Calcite, Keweenaw Co., Michigan, USA 6.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Mindat currently has more than 9,000 [2010] localities listed for calcite and more than 2600 images in our gallery and this number will certainly more than double in the years to come. Although the number of quartz localities is far greater than than those for Calcite, it is still the second most abundant mineral locality wise. Calcite does have the distinction of having more known crystal forms than any other mineral. Undoubtedly several books could be written about just calcite specimens the calcites about from the USA. One one has already been written about just the Calcite crystals from New York State.1 Those pictured are mostly black and white line drawings of various calcite crystals and idealized at that, so you really don't get a very good idea of what the original crystals really looked like.

Almost certainly the great majority of good calcite specimens come from cave networks, those associated with big limestone rock formations and caves associated with and encountered during the mining of copper lead and zinc. Probably the distinction between them is more a matter of degree than anything else. The calcite specimens that come from caves are often not well formed and frequently show rounded looking forms and crystals and not bounded by flat surfaces like those the most venerated crystal specimens. The reason for this is that these specimens tend to be found in the upper reaches of cave networks, closest to to the changeable vicissitude of the atmosphere. Those crystals that form further down in the cave networks whether associate with mines or not, are subject a more constant environment with less change (more constant temperature, Ph, and fluid flow) and therefore an environment that can grow more perfect and larger crystals.

Different societies treat caves differently. In Europe and the united states has seen the emergence of caving societies that have developed very strict rules and regulations regarding the behavior of when they are engaged in exploring caves. It is not permitted to remove mineral formations from caves except under very limited and specific circumstances and all items taken into caves including bodily waste must be removed from caves as well. The exceptions are occasionally made for safety considerations. China on the other hand, though they enjoy caves often mine their caves for cave formations and ship container loads of them all over the world.

There are many localities in the USA for fine calcite specimens but the two that really stand out are the specimens of metallic copper and calcite with the metallic copper frequently growing inside translucent to transparent calcite crystals. These have been popular with collectors for more than 100 years, but with the closing of the copper mines in Michigan at the end of the 20th century, they are becoming rare and very expensive. For many years, British calcite specimens were the standard against which all other calcite specimens were measured. In the 18th and 19th centuries they were very abundant and had little competition with perhaps the exception of some specimens from Germany. With the exploitation of the lead deposits of the Tri-State district and the associated caves that contained tonnage quantities of good calcite specimens, the British calcites were not displaced from the top spot quality wise, but they took a back seat as the leader in quantity of specimens produced. Then in th 1970s a lead zinc mine was opened near Elmwood, Tennessee which in the minds of some collectors and curators bumped the classic British calcites out of first place. However you can look the examples of the Elmwood calcites shown here and make up your own mind about that. Many of the localities whose specimens are shown below have are venerated by their own groups of collectors who and will argue for their merits.

There is another semi-category of calcites that is well represented here in this article and those are those produces by rock quarries which are worked for gravel and building materials. During the working of some of these quarries it is not uncommon to encounter pockets or voids in the rocks that sometimes encounter spectacular calcite crystals. The management of these quarries are in business to make money mining and processing building material and not to collect mineral specimens, so for them the crystals that are encountered are frequently a distraction and cause them to loose money. These crystal lined pocks are also an attractive nuisance that cause some hard core collectors to sneak into their quarries sometimes during the dead of night and cause all sorts of problems and safety risks. Considering the litigious society that we live in today, it is a wonder that they ever permit anyone to enter their quarries. If collectors had free access to these quarries, undoubtedly an order of magnitude more specimens would be collected.

To some extent when many images of a particular calcite (or any mineral for that matter) is shown for a particular locality it frequently indicates that these specimens were produced prolifically by the locality. When this is the case we try and show a good range of different kinds of specimens as well as more than just one of each kind. Often, when only one specimen is shown for a locality it can indicate that the locality not prolific and or that in addition to not being abundant that the locality rarely produced good specimens although it can on occasion mean only, that we only have one decent specimen from the locality.

These fields can only hold about 60,000 characters, and Calcites, USA, had to be broken into two separate articles and may eventually expand to more than this. You can use the fast navigation links at the top and bottom of these articles to move back and fourth between them. The first part are USA Calcites, Alabama to Montana and the second shown those from Nevada to Wyoming. Certainly all states and territories in the USA have calcite occurrences, but not all states are represented here because most of 9,000 localities listed on mindat produce rather scrappy looking material and have been judged not worth the time and effort to photograph let alone show or talk about here in this best mineral article. If you think your favorite USA Calcite locality has been ignored or under represented, shoot us a reply in the forum below and send us some pictures and if you can make a good case for them and help describe the specimens we may very well include them in the article if the specimens can compare to the quality of the others shown here.

1.The Calcites of New York, Herbert Percy Whitlock, Memoir - New York State Museum, 1910



Calcite
USA
Alaska, North Slope Borough, Carter Creek

Calcite after Ikaite 6cm tall© Collectors Edge


These kinds of pseudomorphs, when they are found are usually found in loosely consolidated fine grained sediments like muds. They are "calcites" formed at temperature below about 8 degrees centigrade and this seems to commonly happen in sea floor sediments or in cold bodies of water. As soon at the temperature rises the mineral changes into calcite. I suspect that they might be hugely abundant when they are formed, but Rudy Tschernich of the Rice Museum in Oregon observes: The ones we have (like the one above) were collected by John Cowles "cowlesite" some 40 years ago and John died 20 years ago. He only had a few and I have never seen any others from this locality. They are scarce. People collect fossils in the same area and no one has any of the pseudomorphs. John Cornish collected the ones near Joyce.


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts., Warren District, Bisbee

Calcite 6.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 5cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Calcite 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 5.5cm tall© fabreminerals.com


Calcite 5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Brochantite 3.7cm tall© Fabre Minerals


Calcite including cuprite ~5cm tall©
Calcite including Malachite 4.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite ~3cm wide©
Calcite ~15cm wide©


Calcite 6.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 7cm wide© Cory Boehne


Cuprite in Calcite 2.6cm tall© Kiyoshi Kiikuni
Calcite 14.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Bisbee, Arizona is venerated as a locality by mineral collectors for the tens of thousands of good to spectacular specimens that it produced during the last part of the 19th and first part of the 20th century. It is renown as a producer of wonderful azurite, malachite and many other minerals. During the mining process, many caves were encountered some of which contained tons of calcite specimens. Many of these were typical calcite cave formations. After a while you will lean to recognize these kinds of calcites because they are usually not very well crystallized, probably because the conditions that exist during their growth and not far enough from the surface and are too variable to provide the long term stability that is need for the growth of perfect crystals. Not all the calcites shown here from the various Bisbee localities are what I call "cave formations" and some of them are very nicely crystallized indeed. The ones showing inclusions of red cuprite and green malachite are highly sought by collectors, but are rarely available. They represent a minuscule percentage of the overall production of calcite specimens from the locality.


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts, Warren District, Bisbee, Cole Mine (Cole shaft; Cole No. 3)

Calcite & Malachite 8.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 13.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts, Warren District, Bisbee, Queen Hill, Copper Queen Mine (Halero Mine)

Calcite 6.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts, Warren District, Bisbee, Queen Hill, Copper Queen Mine (Halero Mine), Czar Mine (Czar Shaft)

Cuprite in Calcite ~10cm tall?©



Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts., Warren District, Bisbee, Queen Hill, Copper Queen Mine (Halero Mine), Holbrook Mine (Holbrook shaft)

Calcite 8.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 8.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
.
Calcite 8.5cm center© 2007 Michael C. Roarke


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts, Warren District, Bisbee, Southwest Mine

Calcite 6.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Malachite in Calcite ~10cm tall© J.Ralph


Malachite in Calcite ~15cm wide?© J.Ralph
Calcite 8.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite & Malachite 4.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Aurichalcite 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Dripping Spring Mts, Banner District, Hayden area, Chilito, 79 Mine (79th Mine; Seventy-Nine Mine; Seventy-Nine property; McHur prospect)

Calcite on Hemimorphite 4cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


This little underground mine is better known for its specimens of aurichalcite and sharp little orange Wulfenites but has produced some interesting specimens of calcite and other minerals. This is one mine that has probably produced more specimens after it closed than while it was an active mine. Since it closed many years ago hundreds of collectors from the southwestern part of the USA have on and off had a happy hunting ground in the mine for specimens.


Calcite
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Buckskin Mts, Heson Mine (Hesson Mine)

Calcite on Fluorite 3.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Plomosa Mts, Plomosa District, Bouse

Calcite 3cm wide© 2004 John H. Betts
Calcite 4cm wide© 2004 John H. Betts


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Mojave Co., Black Mts, Pilgrim District, Lost Cabin Wash, Portland Mine

Calcite ~4cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite 5.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite ~5cm wide©
Calcite 7.5cm wide© Paul Nicholson

I need to 'fess up here, Rock. I am the worthless money-grubbing swine that found the calcites in Mohave County, Arizona back in the 1980s. Mining engineer buddy and my old collecting buddy Tom Hughes was working for Western States Minerals at the time he made a visit to the soon-to-be-shut Portland open pit gold mine. The mine is located on the western flank of the Black Range, the last mountain range in AZ before you land in the Colorado River. Tom found a slightly worse for wear calcite specimen on the leach pad that showed promise. He contacted me and said I should try to find the material. Since Tom lived in Denver, he thought I had a good shot at it, living in AZ. Some time later, after the open pit mine closed, I made my first trip up there with my brother in law to walk the benches. My relative stayed drunk, but I found the vein that produced the calcites. I collected some good material. Then, I brought Dick Morris into the project. We dug some more (much of the material that hit the market). When I couldn't get out in the field too often, he took some other folks up to the property, including Mark Hay, et. al. The piece in the AZ Sonora Desert Museum was dug by George Godas, if memory serves me correctly.

I guess God thought that since the London Bridge was moved block by block to Lake Havasu in AZ, that there ought to be some English calcites here as well. So, voila, we have the Portland mine, Mohave County, AZ. In addition, to the modified scalenohedral crystals and the blocky prismatic ones, there are butterfly twins up to about 20 mm. Tom has the best one of the twins. The twins were uncommon and were very hard to collect due to being stuck on a hard, very flat and uncracked wall of the vein that demanded more work for careful extraction. However, the zone was buried by reclamation work before we could get to it. It is still under ownership by a mine promoter, last I heard. The vein is cut off by a high angle fault about 100 feet above the bench and is also truncated by a low angle detachment fault below the bench, so its areal extent was (and is) limited. I did not find any other minerals in the calcite vein. That's my story and I am sticking to it. I estimate around 100 flats by all collectors. I account for 40 of them with the couple of folks i dug with over several years before reclamation.
[Tony Potucek 2009]


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Pima Co., Ajo District, Little Ajo Mts, Ajo, New Cornelia Mine (Ajo Mine)

Calcite including Cuprite 2.8cm tall© Michael Cline


The mine at Ajo (garlic in Spanish), Arizona is a large open pit copper mine and it is the one very big obvious mine in town. It has been better known to collectors for its azurite and malachite specimens, but gave them up much more sparingly than you you might imagine given the size of the mine. But it did produce a few small attractive calcite specimens but Ajo produced a minuscule quantity of specimens compared to the vast specimens production of the great copper camp at Bisbee.

Calcite
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Pinal Mts, Pioneer District, Superior, Magma Mine (Magma Superior Mine; Irene claim; Hub claim; Pomeroy; Superior Division; Silver Queen; Monarch claim; Magma Copper Mine; Broken Hill; Apex)

Calcite 3.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 5.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Mammoth District, Tucson Wash, Ford Mine (Ford property; Old Glory 1-5 claims; Mammoth Tiger Extension Mining Corp. property)

A 3mm Calcite crystal© 0



Calcite
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., Camp Verde District

Calcite after glauberite 4.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite after glauberite 3.8cm© Christian Bracke


Calcite after glauberite 8.3cm© Karl Volkman
Calcite after glauberite ~5cm wide©


Calcite after glauberite 7.8cm© Weinrich


These Calcites are pseudomorphs after Glauberite and are hugely abundant and can still be collected today. You could always collect as many of them as you cared to dig, so as you can imagine, these have always been available very cheaply. In order to enhance the saleability of these specimens, some collectors and dealers learned to soak these specimens in a solution of copper sulfate or other chemical or dyes to change them into a more appealing blue or green color. One of these died pseudomorphs is shown above. There appear to be none of these specimens that are naturally blue or green. These crystals are usually not considered to be "front line" collection material, but they are so frequently seen that I thought we should show new collectors and generally interested parties what they look like. The best examples of these items do get a little larger and sharper than the examples above show. Marcus Origlieri has X-rayed many of these items and he says that all of the crystals he has X-rayed had turned out to be gypsum rather than calcite. Her says that most have a little calcite in them, but the bulk of the crystals are gypsum.


Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Lawrence Co., Lawrence County Zinc District, Black Rock

Calcite & Chalcopyrite on Dolomite 7.6cm wide © Rob Lavinsky


Calcite on Dolomite 8.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Dolomite 5.8cm tall©


Calcite on Dolomite 8cm tall©
Calcite on Dolomite 16cm©


Calcite on Dolomite 6cm tall© Bruce T Mitchell


The locality produces abundant specimens of pink curved dolomite, but fine specimens showing attractive associated calcite crystals are not common.


Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Lawrence Co., Lawrence County Zinc District, Black Rock, Ben Hogan Quarry (Black Rock Quarry)

Calcite on Dolomite 17cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Dolomite 10cm© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Lawrence Co., Lawrence County Zinc District, Black Rock, Meridian Aggregates Quarry

Calcite 5.2cm wide© Bill Morgenstern - Earth Moods



Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Lawrence Co., Lawrence County Zinc District, Hoxie

Calcite 12.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Lawrence Co., Lawrence County Zinc District, Black Rock, Smith Quarry

Calcite on Dolomite 4.2cm tall©
Calcite on Dolomite 4.5cm wide©


Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Marion Co., Rush Creek District

Calcite on Dolomite ~20cm?© 2008 Peter Cristofono



Calcite
USA
Arkansas, Marion Co., Rush Creek District, Rush, Silver Hollow Valley, Silver Hollow Mine

Calcite 16.5cm tall© Christian Bracke



Calcite
USA
California, Alpine Co.

Calcite 9.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
California, Kern Co., Kramer District, Boron, U.S. Borax Open Pit Mine

Calcite on Colemanite ~15cm wide©
Calcite ~6cm wide©


Colemanite on amber Calcite ~6cm wide©
Calcite & Colemanite 9cm wide© Russell G. Rizzo


Calcite ~11cm tall©
Calcite ~12cm wide©
.
Calcite ~9cm wide©


Calcite coating Colemanite ~6cm wide©
Calcite on Colemanite 6.3cm wide© Paul Nicholson


Calcite & Colemanite ~7cm wide©


In the early days of the open pit mine in the 1950s calcite specimens were fairly abundant, but good ones were never common. Most of them were brown or tan colors and not well crystallized. Often the calcite was scattered in little brown, and tan blebs on spiky Colemanite crystals and in some cases the Colemanite crystals were found growing on the Calcite. Specimens with white well crystallized Calcite like the one shown here were quite rare.


Calcite
USA
Colorado, Mesa Co., Grand Junction, Book Cliffs area

Calcite 5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


This locality is much better known for its white very shiny very transparent prismatic barite crystals that are found in large Septarian nodules, but it occasionally produces a decent calcite specimen of two.

Calcite
USA
California, Mono Co., Mono Lake

Calcite var. glendonite 6cm tall© Martins da Pedra


Glendonite is the varietal name of calcite after a pseudomorph of calcite after Ikaite. Ikaite is a monoclinic calcium carbonate with 6H2O. When the Temperature of Ikaite reaches more than 8 degrees centigrade it looses its water and reverts to calcite. There are many localities all over the world for glendonites, probably thousands of them. They are usually found associated sea floor sediments, this strikingly ugly example represents the currently fresh water locality of Mono Lake, though it may not have been at the time of its formation. There are a couple of other more typical and attractive examples shown further down in this exemplar of calcite specimens.

Calcite
USA
California, Riverside Co., Eagle Mtns. District, Eagle Mountain Iron Mine (Kaiser Steel Corp.)

Calcite 9.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


This is not a well known locality for producing calcite crystals, but this one was collected by the son of John Sinkankas son in 1972 from the Eagle Mt. Iron Mine of The Kaiser Steel Mill. Its unusual to find specimen localities in big metropolitan areas and when they are found they are cherished by local collectors.


Calcite
USA
California, San Diego Co., Mesa Grande District, Gem Hill, Himalaya Mine (Himalaya pegmatite; Himalaya dikes)

Calcite 5.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Good calcite specimens are uncommonly found in pegmatites an this one from the Himalaya may be the only from a pegmatite shown in this article on California, Calcites. It has just a bit of pink tourmaline and mica just to demonstrate its pegmatite origin.


Calcite
USA
Colorado, Mesa Co., Unaweep District, Unaweep Canyon, Nancy Hanks Gulch, Nancy Hanks Mine (Nancy Hanks claim)

Calcite on green Fluorite 10.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Colorado, Otero Co., Comanche Grasslands

Calcite ~7cm wide© Alan Goldstein



Calcite
USA
Colorado, Otero Co., La Junta

Calcite 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Colorado, Ouray Co.

Calcite & Sphalerite 6.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov



Calcite
USA
Colorado, Ouray Co., Billy Creek wildlife refuge

Calcite & Siderite 5.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Siderite 4.4cm wide© John Sobolewski


Calcite
USA
Colorado, Ouray Co., Gold Hill District, Pony Express mine

Calcite 9.8cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals



Calcite
USA
Colorado, Ouray Co., Sneffels District (Mount Sneffels District), Ouray, Camp Bird Mine

Calcite on Quartz 3.5cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite on Fluorite & Quartz 6.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite ~4cm tall©
Calcite on Quartz ~7.5cm tall©


Calcite ~6cm wide©
Calcite on Quartz ~4.5c wide©


Calcite ~8cm wide©


The Camp Bird Mine was a large underground gold mine and during its years of production produced quite a few fine, though most would say not world class calcite specimens.


Calcite
USA
Colorado, Pueblo Co.

Calcite 7.8cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals



Calcite
USA
Colorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Howardsville, American Tunnel mine (Gold King Mine)

Calcite 8cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov



Calcite
USA
Colorado, San Juan Co., Silverton District, Silverton, Cunningham Gulch, Osceola Mine

Calcite 5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Colorado, San Miguel Co., Ouray District (Uncompahgre District), Telluride, Idarado Mine

Calcite 9cm tall© Dan Weinrich
Calcite 9cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
.
Calcite 13.3cm wide© Dan Weinrich


calcite 6.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 11cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Calcite 8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite, Quartz & Pyrite 14cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Calcite 6.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 6.9cm tall under UV light© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite on Quartz 3.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 6.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 5.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The Idarado Mine mine was a large underground gold mine and produced large quantities of calcite specimens. Typically they were pink, not terribly well formed and had a good orange/red fluorescence. An example of one in natural light and the same image shown under ultraviolet light is shown above. The fluorescence is thought to be caused by a bit of manganese in the calcite. For several years these specimens of pink calcite could be bought for less than $10 per pound.


Calcite
USA
Colorado, San Miguel Co., Telluride District, Telluride

Calcite 5cm tall© 2000 John H. Betts



Calcite
USA
Connecticut, Fairfield Co., Trumbull, Old Mine Plaza construction site

Calcite 8cm wide© Michael Otto
Calcite 8cm wide© Michael Otto


Calcite
USA
Connecticut, Hartford Co., Bristol, Bristol Copper Mine

Calcite & Chalcocite 5.2cm tall© 2012 Harold Moritz


Specimens of these little white scalenohedral calcite crystals were typically associated with the fine Chalcocite crystals from this mine. They are fairly distinctive in marking chalcocite specimens from this mine.



Calcite
USA
Connecticut, Hartford Co., East Granby, Roncari quarry (Tilcon quarry)

Hematite on Calcite on Prehnite ~7.5cm tall©
Hematite on Calcite on Prehnite ~8cm wide©


Calcite on Prehnite 8cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Calcite on Quartz 6.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite, Prehnite & Quartz 7.2cm tall© A&M
Calcite 8cm wide© A&M


Calcite 7.1cm wide© Jasun McAvoy
Calcite, Prehnite etc. 12cm wide© Henry Minot 2010

The Roncari quarry is a trap rock quarry that has been in operation form more than 50 years and still occasionally produces good specimens. Typically it produces good specimens of Datolite, frequently associated with prismatic quartz and good prehnite. That association with the prismatic quartz I believe to be perhaps unique to the United States. Some of the most interesting calcites that were found there I believe to be those with epitaxial stripes of find grained red Goethite associated with well formed balls of prehnite like the two shown here.


Calcite
USA
Florida, Hardee Co., Lecanto, Crystal Springs No. 2 quarry

Calcite 5.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


This is another example of a near surface cave formation calcite. These were formed around a straw of calcium carbonate and re surprisingly well formed and transparent for a near surface cave formation.


Calcite
USA
Florida, Okeechobee Co., Fort Drum, Rucks Pit

Calcite 4.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite after clam 6.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite in clam fossil 13cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite after clam 11 cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 5.5cm tall© Peter Haas
Calcite 8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite in clam shell 10.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 5.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

These fossil clams that were partially replaces by golden colored calcite crystals were mostly collected by collectors and dealers from a mud filled pit. Collectors would strip down to a bathing suit and wallow in the mud around the edge of the pit and work the mud back with their hands till the found the hard clam shells which would often be found to be full or partially full of very attractive calcite crystals. I believe this locality is still producing and is likely to continue so for some time.


Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Cave-in-Rock Sub-District

Calcite on Fluorite 5.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 6cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Calcite & Celestite 8.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 15cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez


Calcite 7.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The mines around Cave-in-Rock, Illinois have been renown for many generations for their fine fluorite specimens. Associated with the fluorite were occasionally fine calcite crystals that sometimes gave rise to spectacular combination specimens. Many of these calcites were scalenohedral but many other crystal forms were represented. They were usually yellow, golden or brown in color.



Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Cave-in-Rock Sub-District, Ozark-Mahoning Group, Mahoning No. 1 Mine (Minerva No. 1 Mine)

Calcite 7cm wide© Michael Shaw
Calcite on Fluorite 7.5c wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite on Fluorite 5.5cm wide© Collectors Edge
Calcite on Fluorite 4.6cm tall© 1


Calcite on Fluorite 13.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 5.5cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 8.3cm wide© photo by Geoff Krasnov
Calcite 9.1cm tall© fabreminerals.com


Calcite 8.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 5.2cm wide© Dave Richerson


Calcite 8cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 6 cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite on Fluorite 8.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 5cm wide© Collectors Edge


Calcite 8cm tall© Dan Weinrich Minerals
Calcite 11.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Calcite on Fluorite 7.5cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez


Calcite 6.3cm wide© Dan Weinrich
Calcite 7cm wide© Rockpick Legend Co.



Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Harris Creek Sub-District, Annabel Lee mine

Calcite & Fluorite 9.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Fluorite 9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite on Fluorite 7cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite & Fluorite ~20cm wide© Alan Goldstein


Calcite 8.5cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez
Calcite 24cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 12cm tall© www.exceptionalminerals.com
Calcite, Fluorite & Celestine 9.5cm tall © Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 6cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite on Fluorite 7.5cm center© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite on Fluorite 6cm tall© Maggie Wilson
Calcite 10cm center© Stephen Blyskal
.
Calcite 15cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals




Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Harris Creek Sub-District, Goose Creek Mine Group, Denton mine

Calcite on Fluorite 18.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Fluorite 6cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 11cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite on Fluorite 12cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite on Fluorite 5.5cm© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Sphalerite 8cm wide© 2007, Jesse Fisher


Calcite 7cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite on Fluorite 11cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite on Fluorite 8.5cm tall©
Calcite 11cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite 10cm wide© Stephen Blyskal



Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Harris Creek Sub-District, Goose Creek Mine Group, Denton mine, Sub-Rosiclare Level, Bahama Pod

Calcite 7cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 8cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite on Fluorite 8cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 12cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 8.4cm wide© Michael Shaw


Calcite on Fluorite 11.1cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich



Calcite
USA
Illinois, Hardin Co., Illinois - Kentucky Fluorspar District, Rosiclare Sub-District, Rosiclare, Rosiclare Mine

Calcite & Barite on Fluorite 8cm© Alfonso Rodriguez



Calcite
USA
Indiana, Bartholomew Co., Columbus

Calcite 5cm tall© 2002 John H. Betts



Calcite
USA
Indiana, Bartholomew Co., Columbus, Meshberger Stone Company Quarry (Jordan Pit)

Calcite 7.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 2.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
.
Calcite 8.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 10cm wide© Chinellato Matteo
Calcite 6.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 7cm tall© Carles Millan
Calcite 6.5cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Calcite
USA
Indiana, Cass Co., Logansport

Calcite 5.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Indiana, Harrison Co., Corydon

Calcite 3.5cm tall© T. Kennedy 2001
Calcite 4.7cm tall© Danny Jones


Calcite on Dolomite 7.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Indiana, Jasper Co., Pleasant Ridge, Rensselaer Quarry (Rensselaer Stone Company Quarry; Pleasant Ridge Quarry)

Calcite on Marcasite 2.5cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 2.4cm tall© Karl Volkman 1/16/08


Calcite 10.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Indiana, Jennings Co., North Vernon

Calcite 10cm tall© Kristalle and Crys
Calcite 5.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Calcite 4.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 6.2cm wide© Collectors Edge
calcite 3.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Indiana, Jennings Co., North Vernon, Berry Materials Corp. Quarry (North Vernon Plant)

Calcite ~4cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite ~4.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite 5.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite 7cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich, LLC


Calcite 5.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite 7.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite
USA
Indiana, Jennings Co., North Vernon, Paul Frank Quarry

Calcite 11cm tall© freilichminerals
Calcite 3.5cm wide© 2000 John H. Betts


Calcite
USA
Indiana, Madison Co., Anderson, Irving Materials Quarry

Calcite 3.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 10cm wide©
.
Calcite 2.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 2cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich, LLC


The Irving Material Quarry is a limestone quarry that produces road metal and building material. It's about 20 miles northeast of Indianapolis on the southern side of the the town of Anderson, Indiana. This quarry is famous for its beautiful floater twinned calcites, some of which are pictured above. These came from one horizon in the quarry only about two or three feet from the surface. The quarry has produced few if any specimens during the last 20 year. Joe Kielbaso recalls visiting the quarry about 30 years ago with Neil Pfaff just after a bulldozer had cleared the most recent blast. The material on the top was punky and sandy and this material had been pushed aside so the quarry workers could get to the more consolidated stone further down. Over a period of two days they collected about 300 of these twinned crystals. After this blast, the zone seamed to disappeared. He recalls that it was very cold and the cheap motel room that they rented for the night was very cold and they nearly froze their a.. off.
[Joe Kielbaso 2011]


Calcite
USA
Iowa, Scott Co., Buffalo, Linwood Mine

Calcite 9.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 2.5cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite 2.5cm wide© Edelmin
Calcite 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 3.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 4cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite
USA
Kansas, Cherokee Co., Tri-State District, Picher Field, Baxter Springs

Calcite on Sphalerite 11.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


For more than 100 years the lead mines of the Tri-State District of Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma produced any tonnage of specimens that the market could absorb. Only with the end of the 20th century did mining in the area disappear and the once formidable flood of specimens came to an end and we who knew the area even a little are left to wonder and imagine what happened to all those specimens. Where did they all disappear to. At one time you could drive underground in little jeeps for many miles back and fourth between the states. Big caves lined with calcite crystals more than a foot across were not unusual and in Joplin, Missouri a womens bridge club used to descend into a near surface cave to play bridge in the cool comfort of the cave when the the hot summer days and high humidity became too oppressive. Specimens of several hundred pounds of Calcite, Sphalerite and Galena were limited more by the logistics of moving them undamaged to the surface than any other consideration. The collecting tool of choice was a little diesel powered jeep that you would keep waiting at the bottom of some convenient shaft and then when you were ready to collect you would have yourself lowered in a barrel along with nested peach baskets full up with old newspapers down to the jeep. You would hop in and drive off to the place you thought had the best collecting and start hammering out specimens which was never very hard. The reason for this is that it never had to be hard because there were so many easy places to collect where with just thumping the rocks a little to loosen them up you could fill up your peach baskets and after you had eight or ten of them, which was about all you could fit in the jeep, you would drive back to the shaft and get you and your swag hauled up the shaft, just in time for lunch or dinner. Often you had to spend more time wrapping than digging. I only got to collect there a little in the early days of my collecting career, but it spoiled me for ever for having to work very hard to collect minerals. If the number of specimens shown in this article were made proportional to the number of specimens each locality produced, I think about half the specimens shown here in Calcites, USA should probably be those from the Tri State lead mines. Today it is difficult to know this area was once the center of a huge lead mining district. During the Second World War most of dumps that made substantial hills poking out of the flat plane were crushed down to small gravel to liberate still economical amounts of sphalerite and galena. This in turn gave rise to huge piles of mill tailings, often the size of graves. This mostly was good for gravel use and it was all hauled off bit by bit for road and construction use and today its mostly all gone.
[Rock Currier 2010}


Calcite
USA
Kansas, Cherokee Co., Tri-State District, Picher Field, Treece

Calcite, Sphalerite & Galena 7.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Galena 7.5cm tall© Kevin Ward


Calcite on matrix 15.8cm wide© Keven Ward



Calcite
USA
Kansas, Franklin Co. Ottawa, Foggle Quarry

Calcite & Chalcopyrite 5.5cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts



Calcite
USA
Massachusetts, Berkshire Co.

Calcite & sand 10.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Massachusetts, Franklin Co., Northfield, Lane's Quarry

Calcite ~6cm wide© Paul Gilmore
Calcite 10cm wide© Henry Minot 2008


Calcite 7.5cm wide© Paul Gilmore



Calcite
USA
Massachusetts, Middlesex Co., Dracut

Calcite ~6cm wide© Paul Gilmore
Calcite on Dolomite ~9cm wide© 2008 Peter Cristofono


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Keweenaw Co.

Copper in Calcite 8.6cm wide© TVM
Calcite & Copper ~8cm wide©


Copper & Calcite 11cm tall©


For more than 100 years the copper mines of the Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan were one of the great mainstays of copper mining here in the USA and only surpassed when the some of the great copper mines in the Southwest came on line, like Bisbee, Jerome, Ajo, Morenci etc. They were perhaps best known for the wonderful specimens of crystallized copper the mines of the peninsula produced. Not far behind them in desirably, and sometimes not behind at all were the wonderful specimens of copper colored calcite crystals where copper was found growing into transparent calcite. Often the copper on the outside was oxidized a bit and darker than the bright copper inside the calcite crystals and thus protected by the calcite by the oxidizing nature of oxygen. Sometimes these calcites showed various kinds of twins. Its hard to think of these without thinking about the great twinned copper in calcite in the collection of the Seaman Museum in Houghton, Michigan. Occasionally, exceeding clear, sharp and transparent calcite crystals were, encountered, frequently associated with copper, but these often had little copper included in them. There are rare creatures indeed and I have only seen a handful of good one.


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Houghton Co., Centennial, Centennial Mine

Calcite including Copper 4cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts



Calcite
USA
Michigan, Houghton Co., Franklin, Franklin Mine

Calcite 4.5cm tall© 2002 John H. Betts
Calcite including Copper 6.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Houghton Co., Hancock, Quincy Mine

Copper including Calcite 4.5cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite including Copper 3.3cm tall© Kiyoshi Kiikuni


Copper including Calcite 4.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Copper in Calcite 6.5cm© Geoffrey Krasnov
.
Calcite including Copper 5.5cm© Matthew Potts


Calcite in Copper 4cm tall© WWB
Calcite 5cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Calcite 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Copper 4.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 10.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Copper & Calcite 5.5cm tall© Joseph Polityka


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Houghton Co., Wolverine, Wolverine Mine

Calcite including Copper ~6cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich



Calcite
USA
Michigan, Keweenaw Co., Copper Falls, Copper Falls Mine

Calcite on Copper 10cm wide© John A. Jaszczak



Calcite
USA
Michigan, Iron Co., Menominee iron range, Mineral Hills, Homer-Wauseca Group, Homer Mine

Calcite ~7cm wide©
Limonite, back of the specimen to left ~7cm wide©


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Monroe Co., Maybee, Scofield Quarry (Michigan Stone and Supply Company Quarry; Borin Brothers Quarry; Woolmith Quarry)

Calcite 4cm wide© SMS 2009
Calcite 10.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite & Celestite 9.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Michigan, Ontonagon Co., White Pine, White Pine Mine

Calcite 5.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Missouri, Butler Co. Williamsville quarry (Hendrickson Quarry)

Calcite 11.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 6.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Iron Co., Viburnum Trend District, Bixby, Amax Buick Mine (Buick Mine; Moloc Mine)

Calcite 15.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Quartz 4.7cm tall© Weinrich Minerals


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Iron Co., Viburnum Trend District, Viburnum Division Mines), Viburnum No. 28 Mine (Casteel; Viburnum No. 29 Mine; Viburnum No. 35 Mine; Viburnum No. 28 Mine

Calcite 4.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


There are a number of underground lead mines in the Viburnum Trend District in Missouri and they are best known for their Galena and calcite specimens. They do not all produce identical specimens, but some of them produce specimens that are distinctive enough that people who are familiar with them can say with fair assurance which mines produced the specimens. e specimens. If you study the pictures presented here and those in the general image gallery of Mindat, you can also get a pretty good idea of the kind of specimens that these mines produce. I always thought the combination specimens showing both Calcite and Galena were particularly desirable.


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Jasper Co., Tri-State District, Joplin Field

Calcite 8cm tall© 2002 John H. Betts
Calcite ~60cm wide© J.N. Wingard
.
Calcite 14.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 9.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite on Dolomite 4cm tall© 2003 John H. Betts


Calcite 7.5cm tall© fabreminerals.com
Calcite 11cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 10cm tall© Carles Millan
Calcite 8.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 13cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite & Galena 10cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite 11.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Galena 7.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
.
Calcite 12cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts


Calcite 6cm tall© Charles Creekmur
Calcite 5.7cm wide© Dan Weinrich


Calcite 7.5cm tall© fabreminerals.com
2 Calcite crystals ~15 cm tall© Charles Creekmur
.
Calcite cleavage with Marcasite 6cm© 2003 John Betts



Calcite
USA
Missouri, Jasper Co., Tri-State District, Joplin Field, Pelican mine

Calcite 8.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Missouri, Jasper Co., Tri-State District, Webb City-Carterville-Prosperity Field

Calcite 23.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 22cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Webb City calcites are almost a myth in collecting - so few exist to be seen, and so few good ones exist to be owned. This is a fish-tail twinned crystal of huge size, about the size of a football. These are of a rare, unique style found at the turn of the 1900s, in the oldest workings of what was to become the famed Tri-State district in later years. This area today is a disaster site with slumping, empty old cities atop the old mines. This particular specimen would be outstanding from any location, but I think the historic interest as a bonus. It is a nearly pristine, huge twinned calcite with a glowing lavender-pink color when even moderately backlit...presenting just an amazing visual impact without knowing anything about the mineral or locality itself. The only other one like it that I have seen was in the Smithsonian's long-held exhibit on Tri-State material (second photo). I am told by old-timer collectors that most of this material back in the day when found was split along the cleavage planes to make beautiful calcite cleavage chunks for fun and play. Most miners split them in pieces for gifts, paperweights and the like. I had no idea something like this existed on the market to be had, even...until I saw it in the Robert Whitmore collection. He obtained it in an old collection he thinks, sometime in the 1960s. To this day, these remain unique in the world and a major US classic. Ex. Robert Whitmore Collection. Joe Budd photo.
[Rob Lavinsky ~2008]


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Phelps Co., Rolla, Capital Quarry

Calcite 12.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 7.5cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend District, Centerville, Fletcher Mine

Calcite 17cm wide© Brander Robinson
Calcite & Galena 7cm tall© Geoffrey Krasnov


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Reyonlds Co., Viburnum Trend District, Centerville, West Fork Mine

Calcite & Chalcopyrite 12.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 10.5cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich



Calcite
USA
Missouri, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend District, Ellington, Sweetwater Mine (Milliken Mine; Frank R. Milliken; Blair Creek; Ozark Lead Company Mine; Adair Creek; Logan Creek)

Calcite 2.8cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts
Calcite 12cm tall© Alfonso Rodriguez


Calcite on Dolomite 6.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 10cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Calcite on Dolomite ~6cm wide© Peter Haas
Calcite 3.2cm wide]© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite 4cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite on Chalcopyrite 5cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite 7cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Calcite 17cm tall© Albert Russ


Calcite 16cm wide© fabreminerals.com
Calcite 17cm tall© Alfonso Rodriguez


Calcite 15.1cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite 4.5cm tall© Joseph A. Freilich


Calcite & Galena 22.5cm tall© exceptionalminerals
Calcite 11.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Calcite 10cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite 10.7cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite 13.6cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Calcite 17.5cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Calcite 20.5cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Calcite, Chalcopyrite 18cm© Weinrich Minerals
Calcite 13.4cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals

This mine as you can tell from all the pictures shown of specimen from this locality locality has been a prolific producer for many years. The specimens as you can see are often fairly distinctive.

Calcite
USA
Missouri, Reynolds Co., Viburnum Trend District, Greeley, Brushy Creek Mine

Calcite & Marcasite 19cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Marcasite 6cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
.
Calcite & Marcasite 7.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Calcite & Marcasite 15cm wide© Geoffrey Krasnov
Calcite & Marcasite ~40cm wide© Martins da Pedra


Calcite & Marcasite 7.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Marcasite 5.8cm wide© Dan Weinrich Minerals


Calcite & Marcasite 10.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Marcasite 26cm wide© FRANCO LAZZARI


Calcite & Marcasite 7.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Marcasite ~12cm wide©


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Shannon Co., Eminence, Eminence Quarry

Calcite 5cm tall


Brushy Creek is an underground lead mine. During mining operations a cave network was encountered that had a small underground lake/pond and rooms lined with scalenohedral calcite crystals that were distinctive in that most of them had inset panels of iridescent micro Marcasite crystals. Many of them were doubly terminated and not a few of them showed some showed fish tail twinning. A haulage tunnel intersected the cave network, and you would crawl into the cave till you could find some footing because like most wild caves, a flat floor is often not a common feature. You would eventually came to the edge of a little pond and to get to the best collecting area on the other side you would climb on top of a little one man raft and pull yourself by a rope back and fourth across the pond. You would dock your little raft at a little pier at the edge of the pond and the pier was built against the edge of the pond and followed a three to five foot crevice over the water further back into the cave with beautiful marcasite studded calcite crystals lining both walls of the crack with crystals running out of site in every direction. The crystals were to a great extent growing on a thin layer of mud and you didn't have to do much work the collect the specimens. Usually just jamming the end of a screw driver under the crystals with a thump from the palm of your hand and prying up a little was all that was needed to remove a palm size specimen for wrapping. The collecting in many places was so easy that one person could keep two people wrapping without any problem. The calcites and marcasite where glistening with drips of dew and it was a remarkable collecting experience. A group of mineral dealers worked out a deal with the mining company and several tons of specimens were collected. and distributed to collectors and museums. Subsequent to the dig which went on for a few months I have seen some specimens from this distinctive locality labeled as Calcite with Pyrite or Calcite with Chalcopyrite, but to the best of my knowledge the only associated sulfide mineral found with these specimens has turned out to be Marcasite.
[Rock Currier 2010]


Calcite
USA
Missouri, Washington Co., Meramec State Park, Pea Ridge Mine (Sullivan)

Calcite & Hematite 8.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Calcite & Hematite 6cm wide©


Calcite & Chalcopyrite 4.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Missouri, Washington Co., Viburnum Trend District, Viburnum No. 29 Mine

Calcite 12.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Calcite
USA
Montana, Broadwater Co., Radersburg District (Cedar Plains District; Lone Mountain District), North Home Mine

Calcite 8cm wide© Chris Tucker



Calcite
USA
Montana, Carter Co., Alzada

Calcite 7.8cm tall© Mario Pauwels
Calcite 5.4cm tall© Danny Jones


Calcite 9.1cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


The stalactitic calcites are from an occurrence similar to the one which produces the Elk Creek (South Dakota) Baryte - they are both from calcareous concretions in the late Cretaceous Pierre shale. There are many exposures of the Pierre shale in Carter County, Montana which can produce these calcites. Many were collected by Bud Ehrle (of Miles City, MT), from undisclosed locations in Carter County, and sold by various dealers including Black Hills Institute (my company). Alzada is the the only town in southern Carter County, and is near some of the Pierre shale exposures where these can be found.
[Robert Farrar, Black Hills Institute 2011]


Calcite
USA
Montana, Gallatin Co.

Calcite ~7cm tall© Alan Goldstein
Calcite 14cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts


Calcite ~35cm wide© John Cornish
Calcite, display is about 90cm wide© John Cornish


Calcite 10.4cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Calcite
USA
Montana, Gallatin Co., Gallatin Canyon

Calcite 11.2cm wide© KrauklMinerals
Calcite 4.8cm wide© Eric Graff

Calcite 5.5cm wide© Eric Graff




Calcite
USA
Montana, Treasure Co., Myers

Calcite 7cm tall© Chris Tucker
Calcite 3cm tall© Chris Tucker


Calcite 7cm tall© 2001 John H. Betts
Calcite 6cm wide© Chris Tucker





Click here to view Best Minerals, Calcite, Nevada to Wyoming, click here to view Best Minerals Calcite and here to view Best Minerals C and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 74 time(s). Last edit at 08/13/2012 08:25PM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
April 24, 2009 03:30PM
    
Rock

You may not need any more calcites from Elmwood mine, Carthage, given the number already included in this thread, but here are two more that I particularly like:

[www.mindat.org]

[www.mindat.org]

Best

Adam
Re: Calcite, USA
July 03, 2009 03:19AM
    
Lawrence County, South Dakota has some very nice calcite along roads cuts on highway 34. I'll get you a picture or two and upload here at Mindat.

Cheers - Bill
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
July 03, 2009 08:33AM
Adam, thanks for the pictures. Ill have to leave the picture choice to whoever undertakes to write the article. Those are real nice specimens however.

Bill, OK, let me know when you upload them. If they are as good as you say, we will definitely want to include that locality and pictures of calcites from there.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 18, 2009 03:48PM
    
Book Cliffs, in Grand Junction, Colorado, while being noted for it's baryte, has loads of calcite.. I have found many smaller, and some larger crystals such as these.
Calcite cluster
The largest crystal is 4" across.
6" wide calcite



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/18/2009 03:48PM by Jim Hall.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 20, 2009 07:07AM
Jim,
Do you have any good pictures of the barite associated with the calcite? Vernon Alee sp? used to live in Grand Junction and I saw once with him a fine barite growing through a nice calcite crystal. I have not yet written the Calcite USA article or settled on the pictures I will include in it yet and I may include one of yours. Thanks for bringing them to my attention.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 24, 2009 12:31AM
    
I'll have to look. Most I sacrificed the calcite for the baryte, but I may have some. Actually the 6" calcite pic shows an embedded baryte at the 4:00 position.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/24/2009 12:36AM by Jim Hall.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 24, 2009 02:57AM
OHhhh my god Calcite and Indiana yes Check out some of my Calcite ive collected here in Indiana. Id be more then happy for you to use my pictures as long as i get the acknowledgment for them.


Byron

[www.mindat.org] & others.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/25/2009 03:40AM by Rock Currier.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 24, 2009 03:16AM
And yes I will update my photographs.


Byron
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 25, 2009 03:48AM
Bryon,

The article on calcite has not yet been written. The localities and links listed above was done as a little preparation work to help whoever eventually writes the article. Sort of like a contractor grading and compacting a construction site and perhaps hauling in some gravel, sand and cement and perhaps a few loads of lumber. Certainly images of calcites from several Indiana localities will be included and I hope that collectors intimately familiar with those localities will contribute more images and information about the specimens from them, history, geology etc.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 25, 2009 11:57AM
    
Rock

I noticed that there isn't anything from Kingman, Arizona. I uploaded this photo recently so will this be of any use to you.

[www.mindat.org]

I also have this one if you don't mind another calcite from Sweetwater mine.

[www.mindat.org]

Paul.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 25, 2009 01:17PM
Paul,
Those are nice calcites. I would think they will certainly be considered for the article when it is written. Do you have additional information about the calcite from Kingman? There are a lot of miners in that district I think. Can you answer any of the ten questions in the best mineral introductory article about the calcites from there?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 25, 2009 02:13PM
    
Rock,

All I can tell you about it is that I purchased the Kingman specimen in 1999 at a local show from a dealer who obtained it at Tucson. He told me he had that particular piece for quite a while and very few people had even given it a second glance. The only information I have been able to find out about it was a brief mention in the Mineralogical Record vol23 #3 in the Tucson report for 1992. It said that they came from an undisclosed locality near Kingman in Mohave County which had been producing excellent cabinet and miniature specimens of lustrous white to transparent calcite. The crystals, in hexagonal prisms and steep scalenohedron/prism combinations are reminiscent of old Cumbrian and St. Andreasberg specimens. The locality was being worked by Mark Hay and Dick Morris. Is that any help?

Paul.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 25, 2009 07:40PM
Hey its Byron Not Bryon but im used to that. So im guessing you want or need the best of the best when it comes to pictures, well i guess i need to get to work on retaking pictures of some of the Calcite's I have that i have collected in my calcite producing state( that is in reference to my running joke about the only thing coming out of Indiana being calcite.

But anyhow id love for a few of my Calcites to be in your article.



Byron

PS notice the spelling of my name :)
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 27, 2009 10:01AM
Paul,

When specimens are first coming out, the real localities are often vague or incorrect because the person selling them does not want to break his own rice bowl. Its always been that way and I think will always be that way. Perhaps when the article is being written we can track down Mark Hay and Dick Morris and perhaps one of them can give a description of what the best ones looked like, how many of them were found etc etc.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 27, 2009 10:06AM
Byron,
Sorry for the type on your name. You can only imagine what I have suffered with a name like Rock. If you can provide us with better pictures than those we have now it would be appreciated. Perhaps even better, could you provide us with a description of the finds (the ten questions) and a description of the locality and its history. What we are trying to capture is expert knowledge you probably have that can be put into the article so for people who come after can read about the quarry and understand what you understand about it. I know that is impossible, but that is what we would like to shoot for.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Calcite, USA
October 27, 2009 04:32PM
Rock What are the 10 questions?


Byron
Re: Calcite, USA
October 27, 2009 08:23PM
I need to 'fess up here, Rock. I am the worthless money-grubbing swine that found the calcites in Mohave County, Arizona back in the 1980s. Mining engineer buddy and my old collecting buddy Tom Hughes was working for Western States Minerals at the time he made a visit to the soon-to-be-shut Portland open pit gold mine. The mine is located on the western flank of the Black Range, the last mountain range in AZ before you land in the Colorado River. Tom found a slightly worse for wear calcite specimen on the leach pad that showed promise. He contacted me and said I should try to find the material. Since Tom lived in Denver, he thought I had a good shot at it, living in AZ. Some time later, after the open pit mine closed, I made my first trip up there with my brother in law to walk the benches. My relative stayed drunk, but I found the vein that produced the calcites. I collected some good material. Then, I brought Dick Morris into the project. We dug some more (much of the material that hit the market). When I couldn't get out in the field too often, he took some other folks up to the property, including Mark Hay, et. al. The piece in the AZ Sonora Desert Museum was dug by George Godas, if memory serves me correctly.

I guess God thought that since the London Bridge was moved block by block to Lake Havasu in AZ, that there ought to be some English calcites here as well. So, voila, we have the Portland mine, Mohave County, AZ. In addition, to the modified scalenohedral crystals and the blocky prismatic ones, there are butterfly twins up to about 20 mm. Tom has the best one of the twins. The twins were uncommon and were very hard to collect due to being stuck on a hard, very flat and uncracked wall of the vein that demanded more work for careful extraction. However, the zone was buried by reclamation work before we could get to it. It is still under ownership by a mine promoter, last I heard. The vein is cut off by a high angle fault about 100 feet above the bench and is also truncated by a low angle detachment fault below the bench, so its areal extent was (and is) limited. I did not find any other minerals in the calcite vein. That's the story and I am sticking to it.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 28, 2009 02:37AM
Byron,
Read the introduction to the best minerals forums.

[www.mindat.org]

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Calcite, USA
October 28, 2009 02:40AM
Tony, That is good information of the kind we are looking for. Any estimate on how many specimens or flats of specimens were collected?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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