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Quartz, Germany

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Quartz, Germany
March 24, 2009 07:02PM
This Article is under construction:

Click here to view Best Minerals Quartz and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of Best Minerals articles.


Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?


Quartz - Germany
SiO2 trigonal


Here will go an image of a quartz from Germany that will hopefully get users to more closely examine this thread and some introductry remarks about German quartzes.


Quartz
Germany
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Pforzheim

Quartz 1.4cm


Öschelbronn and Dietlingen near Pforzheim are localities known for smoky to almost black double terminated xls, usually 5 mm to 2 cm, rarely up to 4 cm (at least the biggest I've seen). Those are formed in dolomitic marls ("Mittlerer Muschelkalk", mid-triassic). They are double-layered with a crumbly and grainy quartz-anhydrite mixture in the core, covered by a well crystallized outer layer with inclucions of bituninous matter, colouring the xls (so not being a real smoky quartz). Those xls are unique and only known from te northern and northeastern rim of the Black Forest. They are called "Pforzheimer Stinkquarz" (the "stink" means smelling, because freshly broken xls smell burnt because of the bituminous matter). The xls can be collected on the fields after harvest.



Quartz
Germany
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Wolfach, Oberwolfach, Rankach valley, Clara Mine

Quartz FOV 6mm wide



Quartz
Germany
Bavaria, Franconia, Fichtelgebirge, Wunsiedel, Bernstein

Quartz, FOV 2.2cm



Quartz
Germany
Bavaria, Franconia, Fichtelgebirge, Wunsiedel, Göpfersgrün, Johannes Mine

Quartz 9cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Bavaria, Upper Palatinate, Schwandorf, Wölsendorf Fluorite mining District

Quartz 10cm tall
Quartz & Fluorite 6.5cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Hesse, Odenwald, Bensheim, Reichenbach

Quartz 14cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Hesse, Taunus Mts, Usingen, Usingen quartzite works

Quartz 14.6cm tall
Quartz 11.5cm tall

Quartz
Germany
Lower Saxony, Harz Mts, Bad Lauterberg, Charlotte Magdalena Mine

Quartz 6.9cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Lower Saxony, Harz Mts, Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Hahnenklee, Töberschekopf hill

Quartz 6.5cm wide
Quartz 10cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Lower Saxony, Hildesheim

Quartz after fossil 1.5cm



Quartz
Germany
Lower Saxony, Rinteln, Hohenrode, Rumbeck Mtn (Taubenberg Mtn)

Quartz FOV 1.8cm wide
6.5mm Quartz xl on matrix

Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Niederberg area, Velbert, Wasserfall Quarry

Quartz FOV 1.8cm
Quartz FOV 2.2cm

Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Niederberg area, Wülfrath, Rohdenhaus, Rohdenhaus Quarry (incl. Krieger Quarry)

Quartz 7cm wide
Quartz 65cm tall

Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Brilon, Rösenbeck

Quartz 10.2cm tall



Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Meschede, Ramsbeck, Dörnberg Mine

Quartz 4.7cm wide
Quartz 5.3cm wide

Quartz, Sphalerite & Dolomite 8.5cm wide
Quartz 4.5cm wide

Quartz on Dolomite 5.7cm wide
Quartz 6.8cm wide

Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Warstein, Kallenhardt, Brühne quarry

Quartz FOV 1.5cm wide



<Quartz
Germany
North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Warstein, Suttrop, Auf dem Stein quarry

Quartz 2.9cm tall
Largest Quartz is 3cm tall
.
Quartz 3cm wide

Suttrop-Type Quartz

The "type locality" of these crystals is "Auf der Vogelstange", a street at Suttrop, where crystals could be found until the area was mostly overbuilt. They can also be found in nearby quarries. Similar quartz specimen can be found along a "belt" of Devonian and Carboniferous limestones at the northern end of the Sauerland, a low mountain range in Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. This belt extends over 150 km from Dornap near Wuppertal in the West to Wünneberg-Bleiwäsche south of Paderborn in the East and is about 20 km wide. Among the many other locations where Suttrop-type quartz can be found are quarries at Kallenhardt, Wünnenberg-Bleiwäsche, Warstein, Hagen-Hohenlimburg, Velbert-Rhodenhaus.

The crystals themselves are younger than the Devonian limestones and formed probably during the late Paleocoic age in a hydrothermal environment. The crystals can be up to 5cm long, but most are much smaller. The color of the translucent crystals is most commonly a creamy white to light brown. The crystals are characterized by a pseudohexagonal, double terminated habit and a zonar inner structure. Both geyser-like rhythmic movements of water and tectonic events have been discussed as a cause of the zonar pattern. The mineral anhydrite, CaSO4, was incorporated at relatively high temperatures; later some of it was dissolved at lower temperatures (anhydrite is more soluble at lower temperatures), leaving tiny cavities in the crystal that contribute to its white color. Interestingly, overall the temperature during crystal growth increased with time, starting at about 60-80°C and ending at above 120°C, perhaps even above 300°C (Behr et al., 1979), which is very different from the typical development of quartz from Alpine-type fissures, for example. The crystals have a very high number of fluid inclusions, consuming up to 10% of their volume. Accordingly, the crystals have a lower specific gravity than usual. They also never show any accessorial faces and are heavily twinned.
While single double-terminated crystals are most sought-after, the crystals usually occur in irregularly intergrown aggregates that may weigh many kilograms and sometimes accumulate in former karst cavities.


Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Eifel Mts, Mayen, Ettringen, Ettringer Bellerberg Mt.

Quartz, Tridymite FOV 3mm
Quartz FOV 3mm

Quartz FOV 3mm



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Idar-Oberstein, Niederwörresbach, Juchem Quarry

Quartz v. amethyst 11cm wide
Quartz v. amethyst FOV 15cm

Quartz geode 15.7cm wide
Quartz geode 17.8cm wide

Quartz v. amethyst 9.1cm tall
Quartz v. amethyst 13.5cm tall

Quartz geode 9.3cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Idar-Oberstein, Steinkaulenberg

Quartz v. amethyst geode 9cm tall



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Kirschweiler, Katzenloch, Rösselhalde

Quartz v. eisenkissel FOV 5cm wide
Quartz v. eisenkissel FOV 5cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Monzingen, Langenthal, Basalt AG Quarry ("Ferdinand Kloos" Quarry)

Quartz, FOV 2.5mm wide



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück Mts, Stromberg, Limestone quarries

Quartz 21cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Rockenhausen, Lenz Quarry

Quartz v. amethyst 12.5cm tall
Quartz v. smoky 14cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Taunus Mts, Kaub, Slate quarry

Quartz 7cm tall



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Taunus Mts, Nastätten, Miehlen

Quartz 7cm tall
Quartz ~6cm wide

Quartz 10cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Taunus Mts, Singhofen, Jammertal

Quartz 5cm tall
Quartz 3cm tall

Quartz 4.8cm tall



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Taunus Mts, St Goarshausen, Forstbach valley

Quartz 7cm tall



Quartz
Germany
Rhineland-Palatinate, Taunus Mts, St Goarshausen, Nochern

Quartz 7cm tall
Quartz 7cm tall

Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Annaberg-Buchholz, Dörfel, Dörfel Quarry (Bögl Quarry)

Quartz 5cm tall
Quartz 2.5cm tall

Quartz 7cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Annaberg-Buchholz, Wiesenbad

Quartz v. amethyst FOV 4cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Aue, Hakenkrümme Quarry

Quartz 10cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Ehrenfriedersdorf, Sauberg Mine

Quartz 4cm tall



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Freiberg District, Halsbrücke, Beihilfe Mine

Quartz 11.5cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Glashütte, Schlottwitz

Quartz v. amethyst 18cm tall
Quartz v. amethyst 17cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Erzgebirge, Schwarzenberg District, Bockau, Fahsel quarry

Quartz v. jasper 10cm wide
Quartz v. smoky 8cm wide

Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Oberlausitz, Kamenz, Oßling Quarry

Quartz 20cm wide



Quartz
Germany
Saxony, Vogtland, Bad Brambach

Quartz 2cm wide
Quartz 7cm wide

Quartz 7cm wide
Quartz v. smoky 14cm wide

Quartz 4cm tall




Click here to view Best Minerals Quartz and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 13 time(s). Last edit at 09/26/2011 08:48PM by Harjo Neutkens.
Re: Quartz, Germany
March 27, 2009 07:51PM
Auf dem Stein quarry, Suttrop, Warstein, Sauerland, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Suttrop-Type Quartz

The "type locality" of these crystals is "Auf der Vogelstange", a street at Suttrop, where crystals could be found until the area was mostly overbuilt. They can also be found in nearby quarries.

Similar quartz specimen can be found along a "belt" of Devonian and Carboniferous limestones at the northern end of the Sauerland, a low mountain range in Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. This belt extends over 150 km from Dornap near Wuppertal in the West to Wünneberg-Bleiwäsche south of Paderborn in the East and is about 20 km wide.
Among the many other locations where Suttrop-type quartz can be found are quarries at Kallenhardt, Wünnenberg-Bleiwäsche, Warstein, Hagen-Hohenlimburg, Velbert-Rhodenhaus.
The crystals themselves are younger than the Devonian limestones and formed probably during the late Paleocoic age in a hydrothermal environment.
The crystals can be up to 5cm long, but most are much smaller. The color of the translucent crystals is most commonly a creamy white to light brown. The crystals are characterized by a pseudohexagonal, double terminated habit and a zonar inner structure. Both geyser-like rhythmic movements of water and tectonic events have been discussed as a cause of the zonar pattern. The mineral anhydrite, CaSO4, was incorporated at relatively high temperatures; later some of it was dissolved at lower temperatures (anhydrite is more soluble at lower temperatures), leaving tiny cavities in the crystal that contribute to its white color. Interestingly, overall the temperature during crystal growth increased with time, starting at about 60-80°C and ending at above 120°C, perhaps even above 300°C (Behr et al., 1979), which is very different from the typical development of quartz from Alpine-type fissures, for example. The crystals have a very high number of fluid inclusions, consuming up to 10% of their volume. Accordingly, the crystals have a lower specific gravity than usual. They also never show any accessorial faces and are heavily twinned.
While single double-terminated crystals are most sought-after, the crystals usually occur in irregularly intergrown aggregates that may weigh many kilograms and sometimes accumulate in former karst cavities.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/28/2009 10:26AM by Amir C. Akhavan.
avatar Re: Quartz, Germany
March 27, 2009 11:07PM
Amir,
Thats useful information and I'm sure much of it will end up in the article.
Rock

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Germany
September 16, 2009 11:54AM
    
Hello.

There are quite a lot of localities in Germany.

Some really should be mentioned. Sorry, if some are already listed.

Baden-Württemberg:

Öschelbronn and Dietlingen near Pforzheim

known localities for smoky to almost black double terminated xls, usually 5 mm to 2 cm, rarely up to 4 cm (at least the biggest I've seen). Those are formed in dolomitic marls ("Mittlerer Muschelkalk", mid-triassic). They are double-layered with a crumbly and grainy quartz-anhydrite mixture in the core, covered by a well crystallized outer layer with inclucions of bituninous matter, colouring the xls (so not being a real smoky quartz). Those xls are unique and only known from te northern and northeastern rim of the Black Forest. They are called "Pforzheimer Stinkquarz" (the "stink" means smelling, because freshly broken xls smell burnt because of the bituminous matter). The xls can be collected on the fields after harvest.

Im Gehn Quarry, Bramsche, North Rhine-Westphalia

Nice Rock Crystals.

Amethyst locations in saxony (Erzgebirge Mts.) which have produced nice specimen include Seidelgrund Amethyst vein, Wiesenbad and Gebirge near Marienberg.

Smoky Quartz xls up to 12 cm have been found in Granulitgebirge Mts., Saxony (near Chemnitz).

There, at Mühlau a bigger pocket had been hit when a pipeline or cable trench had been built. The xls are prismatic, brown with white rim (partly and thin). Nice ones up to dm in length are from Elzing Quarry, Limbach-Oberfrohna. I've seen a cavity (xls already removed, but a friend told me they were up to at least 50 cm) I could nearly go into. Those are cavities in pegmatite veins, usually accompanied by feldspar xls (orthoclase) and Schorl xls.

Then there are lots of agate localities in Germany.

Regards,
Sebastia Möller
avatar Re: Quartz, Germany
November 07, 2009 10:36AM
Sebastian,
We really need someone to do the article on German Quartz. Any interest?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Germany
November 21, 2013 10:12PM
    
Quarz-Kristalle Johanneszeche, Fichtelgebirge, Bayern, Deutschland

Größe: 15 cm.

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