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Quartz, Australia

Posted by Ralph Bottrill  
avatar Quartz, Australia
March 26, 2009 01:46PM
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Quartz - Australia
SiO2 trigonal


Here will go the best quartz pictures that we have from Australia and some general comments about the quartz specimens from Australia.There are localities out there with fine specimens that are not even mentioned on mindat. Also in some instances there are sometimes pictures on mindat, of specimens from a locality, but they were so ratty that I did not include them here, but there may also be really good specimens from there that we should talk about in this article.

This article will focus on crystallized quartz; chalcedony and other micro- and crystalline varieties like agate and chrysoprase are also prolific and may be best served with a separate page.

Any comments or corrections are also welcome.

Smoky Quartz 7cm tall, Mooralla, Victoria, Australia, © Greg Andrew



Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington

Smoky Quartz 7cm tall© Keith F Compton

Japan Law Twin with Molybdenite inclusions.; 2.2 cm on the longest edge© Jon Mommers
http://www.mindat.org/photo-194231.html

This area is an old tin mining area with quartz and cassiterite veins in granites, mostly mined ~100 years ago and long abandoned. Good quartz crystals are peridodically found by fossickers.


Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Silent Grove Mine

Smoky Quartz, 1.35cm tall© Jon Mommers
Smoky Quartz, 165mm x 40mm © Nigel Richardson


These were recovered from an old tin mine known as Silent Grove, the geology is representative of the granite-hosted cassiterite deposits found throughout that area. Large groups and thousands of single crystals, upto 40cm long were collected about a decade ago in a commercal operation to recover Cassiterite specimens for the collector market. Some very impressive Cassiterite clusters to 10cm and single to 4cm were recovered on smokey quartz crystals. Silent Grove was a working tin mine and from what I have been able to ascertain was first worked in the early 20th century."

I have a specimen matching this one, labeled Silent Grove Road, Torrington. A good number of these superb crystals were found in about 1998 -1999. As I heard it, contractors were digging a trench for roadworks, when luckily some collectors came by and noticed the crystals, and eventually a big dig ensued. There have been a number of other quartz outcrops producing good specimens in the area exposed following logging and road works.
[Jon Mommers 2009]

Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Bismuth Dam

Citrine overgrowing Smoky Quartz, 17cm x 14cm© Patrick Gundersen
Citrine overgrowing Smoky Quartz, 6cm x 2cm© Patrick Gundersen
A group of Smoky Quartz collected from a vugh in Granite. 70mm tall x 40mm wide.© Patrick Gundersen
[www.mindat.org]
Three quality smoky quartz crystals to about 30mm long© James Tzaferis
[www.mindat.org]


A large collapsed clay-filled vugh was discovered in a granite outcrop in the Bismuth Dam region of the Torrington area in 2012. The pocket was dug over 3 days (and a night, hence the name "Moonlight Pocket" !) and yielded over 2000 crystals. These specimens were mostly single crystals with an average size of about 5cm long and in rare cases up to 18cm long. As there has been some post-growth movement in the pocket, only a few clusters were found intact. These crystals featured an unusual growth structure featuring a central core of black Smoky Quartz and then a secondary out growth of richly coloured Citrine. In places the two quartz layers are separated by a thin layer of sericite mica causing the outer quartz layer on the stems of the crystals to have been weathered away, exposing the dark Smoky Quartz stems. The end result is an almost "Scepter" appearance. This is most noticeable in the single crystals as can be seen below:
[Patrick Gundersen 2012]

Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Fielders beryl deposit

23 mm x 31 mm x 15 mm; Pale Smoky Quartz xl with phantoms and a non-terminated pale green part Beryl xl.© Keith F Compton
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]

Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Fielders beryl deposit

Cluster of pale smoky to clear Quartz xls with minor inclusions of Chlorite: 38mm x 21mm x 22mm© Keith F Compton
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]

Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Butlers Road

30 mm x 23 mm x 16 mm; Single terminated Smoky Quartz xl © Keith F Compton
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Clive Co., Torrington, Wolfram Hill

Citrine, 55mm high x 15mm wide.© Patrick Gundersen
h[www.mindat.org]

A nice tapered Citrine crystals were collected in approx 1993 from a large vugh in Granite west of Wolfram Hill, Torrington, NSW. Several hundred crystal up to 10cm long were recovered from this vugh. [Pat Gundersen]

[Info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Drake Co., Drake, Ewingar Creek

Hematite coated Quartz 2.5cm tall© Patrick Gundersen


Located in Ewingar State Forest, east of Drake NSW, Ewingar Creek alluvials contain large euhedral smoky quartz crystals and occasionally amethyst, many of which are water-worn to some degree. Weathered pegmatite vughs in the surrounding granite have produced well-formed smoky quartz crystals to 40 cm and smaller single crystals with secondary amethyst overgrowths.

Australia
New South Wales, Gough Co., Emmaville (Vegetable Creek)

Cassiterite crystals wrapped around a cluster of quartz. 4.3 x 2.5 cml© A&M
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Gough Co., Kingsgate district, Maurers Mine

Bismuthenite in Quartz 32cm tall© Patrick Gundersen


Numerous good crystals, often with a smoky colour occur in the various mines in this area. We could perhaps list some of the individual mines?, eg: Maurers mine, Kingsgate district Marks & Vickery prospect, Kingsgate, Gough Co., New South Wales, Australia. Yarrow River Molybdenite (Yarrow River), Kingsgate, Gough Co., New South Wales, Australia

Australia
New South Wales, Gough Co., Kingsgate district, Yarrow River Molybdenite (Yarrow River)

A nice glassy Smoky Quartz from the Yarrow River deposit measuring 10cm tall x 5cm wide.© Patrick Gundersen
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]

Australia
New South Wales, Gough Co., The Gulf, Rumsby's Pipe

Candlewax Quartz, 160mm x 60mm © Nigel Richardson

Japan twin Quartz, 1.5 cm x 1 cm ©


I dont know much about this site but some great "candlewax" quartz crystals were found here, with white quartz overgrowing smokey crystals.
The story goes that many of the Japan twins were found growing quite thickly on plates of fluorite, the effect looking somewhat like a swarm of butterflies. [D. Sheumack]




Australia
New South Wales, Gough Co., Torrington, Torrington district

Quartz 16.5cm wide© Greg Andrew


Torrington township is in Clive county, but part of the tin field is in the neighbouring Gough County, with similar specimens.


Australia
New South Wales, Gowen Co., Tambar Springs

Quartz on Stellerite 10.5cm wide© Greg Andrew


This general area is well known for fine stellerite and heulandite. Early on many specimens were labeled Coonabarrabran or Gunnedah, both towns a long way from the main collecting sites. There are at least three principal sites:
Garrawilla Station, Coonabarabran district, Pottinger Co., New South Wales, Australia
Glendowda Station, Tambar Springs, Pottinger Co., New South Wales, Australia
and
Mount Mitchell Station, Tambar Springs, Pottinger Co., New South Wales, Australia.

Specimens are found in large cavities in vesicular basalts with pink stellerite and red heulandite, which sometimes have attractive globular clusters of drusy quartz overgrowing them. A large amount of material has been collected by private collectors and dealers, but most landowners present have banned collecting due to some colectors doing the wrong thing by them.


Australia
New South Wales, Hardinge Co., Copeton Dam

Quartz 8.5cm tall© Greg Andrew


Copeton is a popular fossicking area, and an area best know mineralogically for diamonds.
[More info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Hardinge Co., Tingha

Rutilated Quartz 2.5cm Tingha© Jim Tzaferis


Tingha is a popular fossicking area, particularly at Stannifer, 10 km north-west of town along a bitumen road.

[More info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Parry Co., Nundle, Hanging Rock

Quartz 2cm tall© Keith Compton


Hanging Rock is an old gold mining village and also a rock face on the Northern Tablelands, New South Wales, Australia. This former gold mining town is situated about 10 km south east of Nundle. Nundle is noted as one of the best areas in the State for crystals. Some gold and other precious stones to be found include zircons, green jasper, sapphires and serpentine minerals
Nundle was established at the foot of the Great Dividing Range when gold was discovered at “The Hanging Rock” and nearby Swamp Creek in 1852. By June 1852 there were 300 diggers on the fields at Oakenville Creek.[2] . Prospectors from California, Europe and China were also digging along the Peel River and up the mountain slopes.

[More info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Robinson Co., Cobar, Kaloogleguy, CSA Mine

Quartz 3cm wide© Martins da Pedra


CSA Mine is an underground copper mine located in Cobar, Central Western NSW. The mine initially started in 1871 with an erratic production history until 1964, when Broken Hill South Ltd began large scale production. The mine passed to CRA in 1980 and then to Golden Shamrock Mines in 1992. The mine was closed in 1997/8 following its acquisition by Ashanti Goldfields and was reopened in 1999 by Glencore.
Since 1965 the mine has extracted substantial quantities of zinc, lead, silver and copper, but today, CSA Mine focuses on mining copper, with a silver co-product.
Good specimens are rarely seen.

References:
- Chapman, J. R. (2005): A note on some unusual primary minerals from the CSA mine, Cobar. Australian Journal of Mineralogy, 11, 73-74.

[More info needed]


Australia
New South Wales, Westmoreland Co., Oberon, Blue Hill quarry

Smoky Quartz & Muscovite 5.5cm© mark Rheinberger
Smoky Quartz 3.6cm wide© Mark Rheinberger


Smoky Quartz 5.5cm tall© James Tzaferis


The smoky quartz crystals from Blue Hill are found in north/south striking quartz veins cutting metasediments of Ordovician age. The quartz veins are genetically related to fluids from nearby granitic intrusions of Carboniferous age. Although veins up to one meter wide have been found most are between a few centimeters and thirty centimeters. The crystals are retrieved from clay filled vughs which appear randomly within the veins. Gem clear crystals up to fifteen centimeters have been observed and larger ones most probably exist. Although rarer, groups or clusters of crystals have also been collected.
[Mark Rheinberger 2009]


Australia
New South Wales, Westmoreland Co., Oberon, Tarana District

Quartz var. smoky 22.5cm tall© mark Rheinberger
Quartz, amethyst scepter 6.5cm wide© Mark Rheinberger


Tarana lies within a narrow section on the eastern side of the Bathurst Batholith. The granites that make up the Bathurst Batholith are mostly barren of mineralization, although Feldspar, Quartz and Clays were mined in the Tarana district. Around Tarana and other areas to the south, Quartz (Amethyst, Smoky) and Feldspar crystals have been found in small gas cavity pegmatite bodies (miarolitic cavities). These cavities are difficult to locate but occur in the granite generally near the margin of the batholith.
[Mark Rheinberger 2009]]

The Smoky Quartz crystals range in size from tiny to about half a meter long (to date). Crystals often show signs of multiple episodes of growth and sometimes Amethyst forms last covering the smoky with small amethyst crystals. Amethyst scepters also occur occasionally on the smoky quartz.


Australia
New South Wales, Yancowinna Co., Broken Hill

Quartz FOV ~5cm © R. Bottrill


Bipyramidal quartz crystals, to about 10mm diameter. Good crystals to a couple cm occurred in some Ca-Mn carbonate veins in these mines. They were usually quite glassy, but some were amethystine, and other pink (probably mostly due to overgrwing rhodochrosite).
[we need a real good image]


Australia
New South Wales, Yancowinna Co., Corona station

Quartz var. amethyst 3cm wide© R. Bottrill
Quartz 13.5cm wide© Greg Murray


Quartz 7cm wide© Greg Murray


This was an important site for collecting amethyst in the 1970’s-1980’s, but I gather the site is nearly worked out now. The actual site was on a neighbouring station, accessed via Corona, but I forget the name now. The collecting focused a on a couple veins with open vughs with generally small crystals to about 1 cm. They range from pale to very deepl coloured.
Some samples are quite green , from bleaching from exposure to the sun (these contain fine inclusions of a green micaceous mineral). Other are smoky to near colourless.


Australia
Northern Territory, Harts Ranges (Hartz Ranges), Entia Valley

Quartz var. amethyst 2.5cm wide© A.Tuma
Quartz scepter FOV 2.8cm© Judy Rowe

amethyst reverse sceptre 3.7cm X 1.4 cm.©
A "reverse" Amethyst Scepter crystal. 70mm x 45mm©
Sceptre 20mm tall© Patrick Gundersen
amethyst sceptre, 40x40mm© Patrick Gundersen
amethyst sceptre, 65x30mm© Patrick Gundersen
sceptre 23.9 x 13.4 x 13.3 mm© RPellar



This site was only found in the 1990's I think, but has become a minor classic site for sceptre crystals, though they are usually small.


Australia
Northern Territory, Harts Ranges (Hartz Ranges), Harding Springs

Quartz var. amethyst scepter 2.5cm tall© Patrick Gundersen


Although the Entia Valley in Hart's Range, Northern Territory has already been mentioned for Scepter Quartz, the Quartz crystal bearing veins extend much further south to Harding Springs and probably beyond.


Australia
Northern Territory, Victoria-Birrindudu Basin, Wave Hill

Quartz 15cm wide© Greg Andrew
Quartz var. amethyst 8.5cm wide© Greg Andrew


Amethyst 12cm wide© Costas Constantinides
Quartz var. amethyst 7cm wide Wave Hill© Greg Andrew


Amethyst 4.5x3 cm © Albert Russ
Quartz var. amethyst 7cm wide Wave Hill© Greg Andrew
[www.mindat.org]

Wave Hill Fossicking Area lies within Wave Hill Station (also known as Kalkarindji ). The Designated Fossicking Area is designated as FA8 on the Northern Territory Government Department of Mines and Energy maps. (http://gemfossicking.com.au/wavehill_station.html)
Gemstones found in the Wave Hill area of Kalkarindji include Prehnite, Smokey Quartz, Agate, Jasper, Amethyst, Citrine crystal and Calcite. Extensive areas around here are under lain by volcanic rocks; these basalts contain geodes which decompose and weather out over time to form hollow lava encrusted boulders with their inner surfaces encrusted with crystals. These can be found either on the surface or buried in the soil. Where the boulder has been broken or decomposed banded red and white agate or quartz crystal remains.

Similar material occurs on nearby Camfield Station.
"Theses sites are in the Wyalong Ranges, south west of Katherine and when you get to Top Springs Roadhouse head south west towards Wave Hill you will see the ranges, that have much basalt and is the place to find Quartz, Agate (mostly pink and white banding) and Prehnite. Much of the amethyst has pit marks but very good examples do exist. [Costas Constantinides ]


Australia
Queensland, Biggenden Shire, ]Biggenden Mine (Mount Biggenden Mine; Biggenden Gold And Bismuth Mine; Mount Biggenden Bismuth Mine; Mount Biggenden Magnetite Mine; Biggenden Quarry)

Quartz & Calcite FOV 2cm© Rui Nunes 2006


A magnetite-rich skarn deposit, mined in the 1970s, that produced a great many interesting minerals. Can anyone tell us more?

Australia
Queensland, Cairns Region, Cairns

130 mm x 50 mm© Rob Horner
[www.mindat.org]

[Info needed]


Australia
Queensland, Cairns Region, Kuranda

110mm x 80mm. Christine Smith collection and photo. © Christine Smith
[www.mindat.org]
[Info needed]


Australia
Queensland, Junction View via Gatton, Black Duck Creek

Quartz stalactites© Alan Goldstein


Interesting quartz - who can tell us more?


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Cloncurry District, Kuridala

DT Quartz var amethyst 7cm tall© Keith F Compton
Quartz var amethyst 9cm tall© WWB

amethyst, 14cm x 13cm© Patrick Gundersen

"This location is about 7km south east of the abandoned township of Kuridala. The road is about the worst in Qld. The amethyst was found by the Tunneys in the early 1990's; they also found the Silver Phantom silver mine and numerous small copper shows in the area." Costas Constantinides


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Cloncurry District, Mt Elliott Mine

34 mm x 30 mm x 26 mm; Cluster of lilac Amethyst xls on minor Diopside© Keith F Compton
[www.mindat.org]

Drusy Quartz© Alan Goldstein



This was an old copper mine reopened in the 1990's using open stope methods and ore was hauled out using a decline road, and produced a lot of interesting copper minerals (especially micros) and skarn minerals. The adit/portal is now sealed off to stop the more adventurous fossicker as even today amethyst is still everywhere.

"The Mt Elliot mine quartz and amethyst is nearly always found coating diopside crystals.. The Mt Elliot copper mine was of course famous for the large selenites that had native copper inclusions and for diopside, native copper, allanite, chalcocite, chalcopyrite, andradite, scapolite, magnetite, calcite etc " Costas Constantinides


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Mary Kathleen District

Iron stained Quartz 6.6cm wide© Neil A Richards


(Costas Constantinides) "re the other red/milky quartz that says Crystal Mountain ,I do'nt think this is so. All the quartz that comes out of Crystal Mt is long prisms ,mostly clearish ,some with chlorite inclusions..ths piece could come from any where within a 20 K radius of Mary Kathleen,,there is a lot of it for the person who is prepared to dig..
(4) the areas north of Mary Kathleen has Toms Mountain for platey red and hematite included quartz
the areas south of Mary Kathleen has Crystal Mountain for primatic types
Other sites include: Smoky Mountain for prismatic hematite quartz
Skeletal Hill for skeletal quartz
Windy Hill for hematitic phantom quartz(these are very good)
Graves area Ballara mostly stubby hematite and skeletal quartz "


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Mary Kathleen District, Ballara, Graves area

Quartz© Alan Goldstein


"This piece comes from a locally named the Graves area near the abandoned town of Ballara. There are numerous sites that produce this type of skeletal growth (some argue that its hoppered and not skeletal).
Ballara is about 15K south of Mary Kathleen Mine." [Costas Constantinides ]


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Mary Kathleen District, Hightville, Smoky Mountain

Smoky Quartz 3cm wide© Martins da Pedra


This hematite included quartz comes from Smoky Mountain (it was thought the quartz was smoky and not heavily included by hematite as is now known. [Costas Constantinides ]


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Mary Kathleen District, Hightville, Crystal Mountain

[pictures needed]

Crystal Mountain is about 500metres east of Smoky Mountain in the same range of hills. Very popular with locals and visitors. [Costas Constantinides ]


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Mary Kathleen District, Toms Mountain

Hematitic Quartz, doubly terminated 2.5cm© JSS


This site is just west of the old Mary Kathleen open cut. It contains platey red and hematite included quartz. [Costas Constantinides ]


Australia
Queensland, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Cloncurry District, Starra (Selwyn), Amethyst castle

150mm wide© Andrew Tuma
[more pictures needed]

"There is another amethyst site between the Mt Elliot Mine and Selwyn. Its known as Amethyst Castle by everyone locally..Not great specimens but the lapidary people love it for its dark facetting colour and for the chevron banding found there." [Costas Constantinides ]

A small hill, next to a castle-like mesa, has produced a lot of large, dark but gemmy amethyst crystals, to several cm across, mostly iron stained and heavily fossicked by local collectors.


Australia
Queensland, Southern Downs Region, Stanthorpe, Severnlea

11 x 6.5 x 4.5 cm wide.

Severnlea is approx 8 km south of Stanthorpe, SE Queensland.


Australia
Queensland, Southern Downs Region, Stanthorpe, Thulimba

1190mm x 85mm © Nigel Richardson
.

This find was made when the Queensland Main Roads Dept were building a new highway,
just 200 meters from the eastern Queensland / NSW border. Most of the crystals were double terminated, the second termination was usually clear with multiple points. Quite a number were up to 60 cm long, this specimen is just a baby at only 18.5 cm x 6.5..
pix needed


Australia
South Australia, Adelaide Hills

Quartz 3.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz veins in late Proterozoic sandstones in operating and abandoned quarries produced some superb crystallised quartz specimens especially in the 1960’s - 1980’s – maybe still? There were a lot of sites, a couple of the best are the Ashton and White Rock Quarries (see below). Crystals were up to 15 cm long, usually glassy to white and sharp but with some clay and/or iron staining needing cleaning. Its not usually easy to pick the exact location of the specimens.


Australia
South Australia, Adelaide Hills, Ashton Quarry

Quartz 13.6cm tall Quarry© Jon Mommers
Quartz, doubly terminated 9.5cm long© A.Tuma


Quartz 12cm wide© R. Bottrill 2005
.

95mm long double terminated quartz © A.Tuma
. http://www.mindat.org/photo-224963.html

Quartz collected in the mid 1970's. Displays several generations of growth and unusual termination which is complete. Specimens were cheap and prolific in the 1960's and 70's.


Australia
South Australia, Adelaide Hills, White Rock Quarry

Quartz, doubly terminated 3cm wide© R. Bottrill
Quartz, doubly terminated 5cm wide© R. Bottrill


Quartz, doubly terminated 6cm wide© R. Bottrill
85mm x 10mm© Patrick Gundersen
Quartz, 185mm x 120mm© Nigel Richardson
Japan Law twin, 4 cm.© WWB
[www.mindat.org]

The following information is compiled from info by Mark Willoughby, Patrick Gundersen, Tom Kapitany and others.

This is one of the best sites in Australia for good crystals. Specimens were cheap and prolific in the 1970's to 90's.

The quarry lies in the Stoneyfell Quartzite Group, which is in turn part of the Adelaide Geosyncline. It is believed, to have formed during the late Proterozoic thru to the end of the Cambrian (approx 900-500 million years ago). The quarry itself is a mix of Quartzite and Slates, and the vughs can occur in both rock types. I've hear of "room-sized" open vughs being found there and have seen crystals up to nearly a meter long in personal collections. The vughs I have seen in-situ were all clay filled, and on the night I found all those slender double terminated ones, the kaolin clay in the vugh was dry and powdery, so these crystal would "tinkle" together (don't know how else to describe that sound!) as they came out of the vugh. I think nearly 400 crystals came out of that one pocket! There are a number of fault structures with the quarry faces , these allowed the hydrothermal solutions to deposit (seed) the crystals.

The quarry is well known for its large clear crystals of quartz, showing many different forms, from single crystals thru to multiple crystal groups. It is especially well known for its spectacular ‘Japan Law’ twinned specimens. It is also known for producing some of the largest 'totally clear' crystals in Australia.

The South Australian Museum has dedicated an entire display case to the specimens of White Rock Quarry. It is quite surprising and somewhat upsetting to see that we only have 5 specimens currently (as of 6th April, 2012), showing here on Mindat! I know many collectors that have numerous specimens from this locality, all of which are great examples of this locality.

Some mineral dealers were very fortunate to get access with the quarry operators permission in the 90s. Peter Shelton had made arrangements to commercially collect the qtz crystals . He collected there for about a month or so , with Kevin Davies being the main purchaser .

The volkwagen size mud filed vugs were lined with crystal plates and double terminated crystals loose in the mud. You just had to stick your had into the mud feel around and extracted a beatiful 6 inch double terminated crystal. Many were iron coated and need to be acid cleaned , Jap Law Twins were to be found as well.

Tom Kapitany sold a wonderful cluster to Warren Sommerville many years ago with spectaular epitaxial growth, now on display in the Bathurst Museum .

After an altercation with a quarry staff member and a collector, collecting permission was rescinded and never given again. Security was upgraded due to the illegal night activity as public liabily and safety was and still is a major concern . The quarry is now off limits to all collecting.






Australia
South Australia, Adelaide Hills, Williamstown

Hematitic Quartz, 3.5cm tall© R. Bottrill



Australia
South Australia, Olary district

Hematitic Quartz 3cm wide© R. Bottrill
Hematitic Quartz 5cm wide© R. Bottrill


Quartz 6cm long© R. Bottrill
crystalised Gold included in a Quartz crystal, 25mm x 25mm© Patrick Gundersen

Excellent crystals have been found in a number of sites in this area, including Weekeroo, Dome Rock and Kings Bluff, and range from colourless to smoky, and up to about 100mm long.

Some beautiful lustrous Smoky Quartz from "Baxter Prospect", Olary, SA appear in Albert Chapman's collection in Sydney, and rank as some of the finest smoky Quartz from Australia. Mark Willoughby suggests they were from the Raven Hill South Mine, Old Boolcoomata Station, Olary Province.

Australia
South Australia, Olary district, Outalpa Station,

Double terminated near transparent smoky quartz crystals to 2.8 cm in length© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
[www.mindat.org]

Australia
South Australia, Eyre peninsula, Cowell, Kathleen Patricia Mine

Smoky Quartz 2.5cm wide© Martins da Pedra

Approx 26km north-northwest of Cowell, the deposit has formed in a northly trending section of the Warrow Quartzite, from the Hutchison Group, which is believed to be of Lower Proterozoic age (542-2500mya).
Crystals as large as 15cm in diameter have been found and plates containling numerous crystals to approx 90cm in diameter.
The best crystals appear to have been found in the 30-60cm (depth) zone, with crystals above this depth being faded.
Chemical testing shows little difference in the composition of chemistry between the clear and the smoky varietys. With no obvious trace element being responsible for the smoky colourisation.
There may, however, appear to be a link between temperature and the changes in colour.
Few if any gem quality specimens have been found here, although collector quality specimens are common.
Production from 1977-2007 of semi precious stones - Quartz was estimated at 20 tonnes.

[Mark Willoughby]


Australia
South Australia, Flinders Ranges, North Flinders Ranges, Umberatana, Tourmaline Hill granite pegmatites

Quartz 6.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

A morion (smoky quartz) mine.
Production from 1977-2007 of semi precious stones - Quartz was estimated at 20 tonnes.



Australia
South Australia, Flinders Ranges, North Flinders Ranges, Arkaroola Station, Mt Gee

This site is a highly vuggy deposit riddled with quartz-filled vughs, with some large and fascinating specimens found, usually iron-stained. Amethyst is rare.

amethst, 7x7cm© Patrick Gundersen
More photos and info needed


Tasmania
Philosophers Ridge, Queenstown district, Tasmania, Australia

Quartz 7.5cm wide© Andrew tuma


Quartz veins are well exposed on the rocky surface on Philosophers Ridge and near the Iron Blow mine. Although the veins are highly weathered and decomposed, spectacular quartz crystals to 6 cm can be collected, usually lustrous and colourless or milky. Some exhibit fascinating chlorite and haematite inclusions, colouring them variously green, red or black, or rarely smoky or amethystine. Some of the haematitic quartz crystals are sprinkled with small black to blue anatase crystals. It occurs as lustrous, often spectacular crystals to 50 mm in several varieties: colourless; green (chloritic); red to bluish or black (haematitic); or rarely smoky or amethystine crystals (Day, 2001), as well as a massive, milky gangue mineral. Quartz forms in at least four stages: it is the main matrix and second crystallising phase in vughs in the veins , but it may overgrow later minerals, indicating a spasmodic deposition and forming interesting "phantoms". Some good Japan-law twins and “faden” habits occur. Some exhibit fascinating vermicular chlorite and specular to colloidal haematite inclusions, usually much less than a millimetre in size.


Australia
Tasmania, Queenstown district, Prince Lyell mine

Quartz ~4cm wide© R Bottrill 2008


35 mm x 25 mm x 10 mm. Flattened quartz group with abundant red hematite inclusions and a creamy dolomite; a faden-like floater.© R Bottrill
[www.mindat.org]

The Mt Lyell copper-gold mines produce some excellent crystallised specimens of quartz, usually with chalcopyrite, haematite, dolomite-ankerite and other minerals, in late stage veins. The deposits are generally considered to be of Cambrian volcanic origin, but the late stage, mineralised but undeformed veins,may be of Devonian age. The opportunities to collect on the mine leases are infrequent and collecting is discouraged by mine management. However some miners continue to rescue specimens of reasonable quality and these are readily available from some outlets in Queenstown and elsewhere.


Australia
Tasmania, Waratah district, Waratah, Mt Bischoff

Quartz FOV ~2cm©
~40mm long © R Bottrill

Quartz crystals are common in this mine, usually in quite small crystals (to 1cm) with cassiterite and pyrite, etc, but some excellent large black to smoky crystals up to 5cm have also been found.


Australia
Tasmania, Heazlewood district, Luina, Mt Cleveland Sn Mine

Quartz & Dolomite 10cm long© R. Bottrill


Some excellent large crystals were found in this mine, to 150mm long, commonly with dolomite and fluorite, when underground mining was undertaken in the 1960’s-70’s.


Australia
Tasmania, Rosebery district, Williamsford, Mt Read

Hematite stained Quartz 2.5cm wide© R Bottrill 2008
http://www.mindat.org/photo-219697.html

Hematite-stained, doubly terminated quartz crystal, 25mm long.© R Bottrill 2008
http://www.mindat.org/photo-219699.html

Haematite-included quartz group about 50mm long.© R. Bottrill
http://www.mindat.org/photo-534418.html

Excellent bright red crystals are sporadically collected in this area.


Australia
Tasmania, Rossarden district, Aberfoyle Mine (Aberfoyle Tin Mine; Rossarden Tin Mine)

Smoky Quartz 5cm tall© 2003 John H. Betts
Quartz var. amethyst & Apatite 4cm wide© R Bottrill


The mine is developed on a number of relatively narrow quartz lodes traversing hornfelsed slates of the Ordovician to Early Devonian Mathinna Beds. The lodes are related to an underlying granite, part of the Ben Lomond pluton, of late Devonian age. These granites are responsible for the tin and tungsten mineralisation throughout Tasmania, and some of the gold, copper, silver and lead mines also. The veins are vuggy and mostly zoned, with a selvage of muscovite-cassiterite-wolframite, overgrown by quartz, topaz, fluorapatite and fluorite, with a central zone of late stage sulphides, haematite, scheelite and carbonates. There may, however, be several generations of some minerals. The wallrocks are hornfelsed, and locally silicified, sericitised and tourmalinised. Quartz makes up the bulk of the veins, and occurs as good crystals in vughs, from colourless to smokey, amethystine or white in colour.


Australia
Tasmania, Upper Forth Valley, Oakleigh Creek mine

Quartz 12.5cm wide© Andrew tuma


Some excellent large milky white crystals were found in this abandoned mine, to 150mm long, commonly with cassiterite and wolframite, also fluorite and muscovite, when underground mining was undertaken in the 1960’s-70’s.


Australia
Tasmania, Waratah district, Hellyer-Que River Mines

Quartz 10cm tall© R. Bottrill 2007


These two Pb-Zn mines are located close to one another, are probably tectonically displaced parts of the one ore deposit, and were mined almost simultaneously (1974-2000; McArthur and Dronseika, 1990). They are, again like Rosebery, volcanogenic massive Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu sulphide deposits hosted by the Cambrian Mt Read Volcanics. Quartz occurs in lustrous crystals to ~6 centimetres in vughs in both the Que River and Hellyer Mines. Good, small tennantite-tetrahedrite crystals have been found on quartz crystals in the Que River mine (Fig 9).
[Good quartz crystals also occur in many of the Zeehan and Heazlewood mines, and the Hercules, Que River and Rosebery mines (Fig. 9).]


Australia
Tasmania, Zeehan district, Mt Heemskirk mineral field

Quartz var. amethyst 3.5cm wide© R Bottrill 2008
Quartz var. amethyst 2.5cm wide© R. Bottrill 2005

Quartz occurs in miarolytic cavities and small pegmatite pods in Devonian granites, where it is mostly smoky to milky in colour, but some colourless quartz, amethyst and citrine crystals also occur. Black tourmaline is a common associate, and some caviries contain cassiterite. Local collectors walk through the granite heathlands looking for residual quartz and excavate pockets where signs of crystals are found.
also, Trial Harbour. In the old Mt Heemskirk tin field, north of Trial Harbour and west of Zeehan, some sporadically large miarolitic cavities in Devonian tin-bearing granite contain vughs containing interesting crystal groups of quartz (smoky, milky and green with tourmaline inclusions to about 10 cm (Fig#)) and tourmaline (schorl, black to dark green, to 6 cm), plus sporadic pods of cassiterite.


Australia
Tasmania, Zeehan district, Renison mine

Quartz & Pyrite 6cm wide© R. Bottrill

Quartz crystal with siderite 45x30mm.©
[www.mindat.org]

This tin mine has produced some interesting quartz crystals commonly as crystals in vughs with rhodochrosite, ankerite-dolomite, siderite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, arsenopyrite and pyrrhotite fluorite vivianite (Bottrill, unpub. data).
[geology, history]


Australia
Tasmania, Gladstone

Smoky Quartz 15cm wide© R. Bottrill

Smoky Quartz 20cm long© R. Bottrill
[www.mindat.org]

Smoky quartz crystals, mostly gemmy in part, and up to metre in length, occur in decomposed pegmatite pockets and stream gravels at Gladstone.


Australia
Tasmania, Tulendeena

Smoky Quartz & Microcline 9.5cm wide© A.Tuma
Largest crystal ~ 60mm long© Andrew Tuma
http://www.mindat.org/photo-271010.html

At Tulendeena, east of Scottsdale, quartz occurs in miarolytic cavities and small pegmatite pods in Devonian granites, where it is mostly smoky to black in colour, and occurs with some green to white micrcocline crystals. The granite is pretty massive and there has been little collecting, but the area has good potential.


Australia
Tasmania, Moina, Dolcoath Hilll Quarry

smoky quartz crystal, 75mm long © Ralph Bottrill
http://www.mindat.org/photo-506633.html
xtl of Quartz to ~70mm © Ralph Bottrill
http://www.mindat.org/photo-506634.html


Australia
Tasmania, Moina, The All Nations mine,

xtls of Quartz to ~30mm ©
[www.mindat.org]

The All Nations mine, ~1 km to the east of the quarry on Dolcoath Hill, Moina, is an old tin-tungsten-bismuth vein deposit in sandstone, containing some excellent quartz crystals (commonly gemmy, ranging from colourless to smoky or milky(Fig#)) and some small but fine wolframite and orange-brown monazite crystals.

The Princess Mine, Moina

Smokey Quartz xtls with Muscovite, 130x125x80mm. ©
[www.mindat.org]

which recently produced excellent crystals of topaz, fluorite and bismuthinite, and is presently being reopened by miners for gems and minerals. Large smoky quartz crystals (<20 cm) also occur in the general area.


Shepherd & Murphy, Moina
[Pix]
This mine, on the western side of Dolcoath Hill, was one of the more important in the district and probably produced over 1000 t of combined Sn, W & Bi metal between 1893 - 1957. It contains several quartz-cassiterite-wolframite-bismuth veins, alluvial deposits and skarns. Recent exploration has uncovered large resources of fluorite, gold and zinc in the skarns. Crystallised specimens of topaz, quartz, molybdenite, bismuthinite, and realgar(Fig#) can be found on the dumps.


Australia
Victoria, Mooralla, Anderson's Gully (Anderson's Creek)

Smoky Quartz 5.7cm tall© Safaa Yu
Smoky Quartz 4cm tall© 2001 John H. Betts


Quartz & smoky Quartz 5.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Smoky Quartz 6cm wide©


Smoky Quartz on drusy Quartz 61 x 63 x 50 mm.© JAF, LLC
http://www.mindat.org/photo-237156.html


Mooralla has long been a famous collecting area, mainly in lapidary circles, and is renowned for its spectacular specimens of smoky quartz. Lesser known is the occurrence of other forms of quartz, including epimorphs, and a small number of other minerals.
The popular smoky quartz collecting area of Mooralla, also known variously as Black Range or Anderson’s Creek, is located west of the Grampians in western Victoria near the Rocklands Reservoir. The township of Mooralla consisting mainly of a few buildings, is a few kilometres to the southeast. See Map at MultiMap.com.

Access is via a rough track, which is often difficult to travel on, particularly following bouts of wet weather. The collecting area itself is Victoria’s only? fossicking reserve, and is "looked after" by the Horsham Gem Club members. Fossickers are allowed to camp there, and a toilet facility was erected a number of years ago. Those that have used this facility will attest to the resilient nature of the local flies, who may be trapped for many months, but when the lid is lifted, sound like a jumbo jet taking off as they escape!

The treasured smoky quartz "geodes" that have been highly sought since the 1960s, occur in a decomposing rhyolite, and are sometimes described as miarolitic cavities. Where once good specimens could be extracted from near the surface, holes are now dug down to depths approaching 6 metres in the main part of the field. For those that like smaller specimens, loose crystals, or the other minerals that are occasionally found, shallow holes to about 2 metres deep at the perimeters of the field will fulfill their needs.

Quartz is the dominant mineral found at Mooralla. The most popular, sought after, and aesthetic form, is the so-called Mooralla Crystal (smoky quartz), which may be found as simple or complex crystals, or groups of crystals to many centimetres in length, and rarely as sceptres. Many of these crystals are not simply a dark form of quartz, but exhibit wisp-like curls of smoke that swirl through the crystal. Gas bubbles in liquid inclusions are not uncommon but are difficult to find until you have "got your eye in". Recent editions of both the Mineralogical Record and the UK Journal of Mines and Mineralogy have featured photographs of Mooralla Crystals (although both have misspelt the locality as "Moorella"), and the special publication from the Mineralogical Society of Victoria, Gemstones of Victoria, features a small section on Mooralla.
Loose crystals are common where they have weathered out of the rhyolite. However, deeper down, specimens on matrix can still be collected, but beware. Some crystals that look like they are firmly attached, may come away when the specimen is washed. Even many of the more resilient crystals may show signs of damage to terminations and internal fractures, possibly pointing to some geological activity after they had formed.

Other forms of crystalline quartz include pale lilac amethyst, which is scarce and usually only occurs in small crystals up to about 1cm in length, and small colourless quartz to only a few millimetres which often lines cavities. Rarely, cavities may be filled with banded agate, a cryptocrystalline form of quartz.
[Steve Sorrell 2010]


Australia
Victoria, Rural City of Wangaratta, Eldorado

70 mm x 55 mm Smoky © R.Horner

[www.mindat.org]


Australia
Victoria, Rural City of Wangaratta, Springhurst

5 mm amethyst© Pat Sutton


[www.mindat.org]


Australia
Victoria, Terip Terip



{photos needed]
Some seven or eight years ago an area measuring 200 x150m was excavated on a pegmatite exposure near Terip Terip, to a depth of about 30m, when pumps could not keep up with the influx of ground waters and work stopped. Dark smoky with good lustre and large gemmy sections were recovered mainly as singles to 50cm, with crystals measuring 20 to 30cm being relatively common. Unfortunately, their recovery was undertaken by a number of well intentioned but inexperienced collectors and the majority of specimens showed significant damage. The largest group I have seen recovered from this deposit measured some 60x 50cm at the base. [Jon Mommers]

Lake Boga granite quarry, Lake Boga, Victoria, Australia
Field of view 8cm©
32mm©
[www.mindat.org]

This quarry was in granite with pegmatitic cavities containing a range of interesting primary and secondary minerals.

Australia
Western Australia, Mitchell Plateau

Excellent specimens of glassy crystals with epidote

Photos and Info needed

Neil Richards: Two places I will mention in Victoria that have not been mentioned ( and I will attempt to take photo's the next time I am at both places) are the spectacular clear quartz clusters with scatterings of pyrite throughout from the Morning Star Mine at Woods Point; and sensational double terminated pieces with enhydro inclusions from Specimen Gully near Chewton.

There is also an amethyst locality called the White Swan Crystal Mine near Mount Kooyoora, near Rheola In Victoria; this site is now closed for collecting as it is in a National Park. Torbernite and autinite are also found at this locality.


Australia
Western Australia, Mullewa Shire, Tallering Peak,

50 mm x 40 mm x 25 mm©
[www.mindat.org]

5 cm x 2.3 cm x 1.8 cm©
[www.mindat.org]

25 mm x 20 mm x 16 mm©
[www.mindat.org]


Sourced from West Australia’s Tallering Peak Hematite mining operation, a single vuggy boulder in the pit yielded a very select few of these stunning crystals, collected by Craig Bosel in 2013.

"I have never seen quality quite like this from Australia, not even from White Rock quarry. Razor sharp terminations, exceptional clarity, stunning early generational phantoms and an almost electric smoky colour place specimens from this mine in the league of their own. To those who were fortunate to have won such specimens off Craig, treasure them well!": Nigel Richardson.

Australia
Western Australia, Pilbara Region

Quartz var. jasper 17.5cm wide© vasco trancoso

Info needed



Australia
Western Australia, Wyloo The Great Australian Amethyst Mine ("Austwen mine"; Wyloo amethyst mine), Wyloo Station, Ashburton Shire, Western Australia, Australia

Quartz var. amethyst 8cm wide© Greg Andrew

Quartz var. amethyst 6cm wide©
[www.mindat.org]


The "Austwen Mine" Wyloo Station is a deposit that was worked commerically in the 1960's and 1970's for amethystine Quartz for the lapidary trade predominately both for gaceting and tumbling. My understanding the bulk of the production was sent to Germany. The property was idle and ownership changed a couple of times in the 1980's and early 1990's and finally when the current owner acquired the property all mining was ceased and permission must be sort to hand collect only and then on a very limited basis. The best of the specimens from Wyloo were mindblowing and have always been difficult to obtain, some the best were sold by Michael Newnham, a Melbourne based collector, in the 1980's. (from Jon Mommers)

[Ralph Bottrill, 9th April 2009]



Click here to view Best Minerals Quartz and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Regards,
Ralph



Edited 54 time(s). Last edit at 05/17/2014 02:24PM by Ralph Bottrill.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
April 05, 2009 03:22AM
Help is needed with this site please, its coming together but we need more information and photos, particularly for:

New South Wales, Hardinge Co., Copeton Dam
New South Wales, Hardinge Co., Tingha
Wave Hill, Victoria-Birrindudu Basin, Northern Territory, Australia
Biggenden Mine, Queensland, Australia
Black Duck Creek, Junction View via Gatton, Queensland, Australia
Mt Elliott Mine, Cloncurry, Cloncurry District, Mt Isa - Cloncurry area, Queensland, Australia
Kathleen Patricia Mine, Cowell, Eyre peninsula, South Australia, Australia
Tourmaline Hill granite pegmatites, Umberatana, North Flinders Ranges, Flinders Ranges, South Australia, Australia
Terrip Terrip, Victoria
Pilbara Region, Western Australia, Australia
Wyloo, Western Australia, Australia
And any other good sites not represented - there are probably hundreds!

thanks
Ralph

Regards,
Ralph



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/08/2012 06:27AM by Ralph Bottrill.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 02:21AM
South Australia produces some of the best quartz around, so I was surprised to see so little on Mindat. I have uploaded a few pictures of mine: [www.mindat.org].
They are not the biggest or best, but it may spur the South Aussies to get a few pix together (maybe its too common there?). Also a couple new tassie ones that may be useful.
Ralph

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 02:32AM
Ralph, I am afraid that is just the tip of the ice berg on what can be done with quartz. After going through all the quartz images I realized how few good things are represented here on mindat. The amount of work that should be done on it boggles the mind. I just try and not think about it. I am trying to concentrate on a framework that others can build on and try and do a little of the building myself when I can find the time. It looks like Alfredo Petrov has caved in and is going to try and get the quartz from Bolivia article started and a couple of nibbles of others that might be interested in starting work on the quartz from other countries. Ill just keep plugging away and see where this thing takes us.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 09:51AM
I am a bit reluctant to volunteer for too much but Crocoite is now in a fair state, so if you would like help in any particular area with an Australian bias - its just very hard to know where to start with it all.
Ralph

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 10:55PM
    
Hi Rock,

Here is a little bit relating to the Blue Hill quarry, Oberon, Westmoreland Co., New South Wales, Australia

The smoky quartz crystals from Blue Hill are found in north/south striking quartz veins cutting metasediments of Ordovician age. The quartz veins are genetically related to fluids from nearby granitic intrusions of carboniferous age. Although veins up to one meter wide have been found most are between a few centimeters and thirty centimeters. The crystals are retrieved from clay filled vughs which appear randomly within the veins. Gem clear crystals up to fifteen centimeters have been observed and larger ones most probably exist. Although rarer, groups or clusters of crystals have also been collected.

I'm not sure if this is suitable, I have more to add and a reference if needed.

Mark.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 11:06PM
Ralph,
I was thinking and it occurred to me that you might take a crack at doing atacamite. When I uploaded pictures of my A minerals there were several quite good pictures of Australian atacamites that I have taken over the years as well as a good suite of Farola mine atacamites. I could write up the bit about the Farola mine, Copiapo, Chile locality.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 11:08PM
Steve Sorrell did a great article on Mooralla a while back for our Min Soc Tas newsletter - I will check if we can plagiarise it for the purpose.

And I will bite the bullet on Tasmanian & S. Aust quartzes if no-one else is jumping in?
Ralph

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 23, 2009 11:37PM
Ralph,
I think you will find that doing these articles is a bit like Tom Sawyer white washing a fence. Pretty soon other guys come along, and if we look like we are having enough fun doing it, they want to help and if you are clever you can hornswaggle them into doing the work too.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Quartz, Australia
March 24, 2009 01:53AM
    
Hi Rock,,,(1)re the quartz from the Mt Isa/Cloncurry .This piece comes from a locally named the Graves area near the abandoned town of Ballara..There are numerous sites that produce this type of skeletal growth.(some argue that its hoppered and not skeletal)
Ballara is about 15K south of Mary Kathleen Mine.
(2)re the quartz that says Crystal Mountain..This hematite included quartz comes from Smoky Mountain (it was thought the quartz was smoky and not heavily included by hematite as is now known..Crystal Mountain is about 500metres east of Smoky Mountain in the same range of hills.Very popular with locals and visitors..
(3)re the other red/milky quartz that says Crystal Mountain ,I do'nt think this is so..All the quartz that comes out of Crystal Mt is long prisms ,mostly clearish ,some with chlorite inclusions..ths piece could come from any where within a 20 K radius of Mary Kathleen,,there is a lot of it for the person who is prepared to dig..
(4) the areas north of Mary Kathleen has Toms Mountain for platey red and hematite included quartz
the areas south of Mary Kathleen has Crystal Mountain for primatic types
Smoky Mountain for prismatic hematite quartz
Skeletal Hill for skeletal quartz
Windy Hill for hematitic phantom quartz(these are very good)
Graves area Ballara mostly stubby hematite and skeletal quartz
All areas in between
Con
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 24, 2009 02:05AM
Con
Good info; do you have a few pictures? I collected some good amethyst at Amethyst Castle on the Kuridala Rd, and some nice quartz from near Fountain Springs 25 years ago, but I dont know where it all got to now - pehaps in my shed somewhere. But I am sure there are good specimens and images out there that people want to see on Mindat.

Rock
It is fun, even though it can get time-consuming if you let it (do you sleep?), but its nice to be able to choose the best images and info available to show the world.

Ralph

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 25, 2009 06:05AM
    
Here is a bit for,,,,,, (Tarana District, Oberon, Westmoreland Co., New South Wales, Australia)

Tarana lies within a narrow section on the eastern side of the Bathurst Batholith. The granites that make up the Bathurst Batholith are mostly barren of mineralization, although Feldspar, Quartz and Clays were mined in the Tarana district. Around Tarana and other areas to the south, Quartz (Amethyst, Smoky) and Feldspar crystals have been found in small gas cavity pegmatite bodies (miarolitic cavities). These cavities are difficult to locate but occur in the granite generally near the margin of the batholith.

The Smoky Quartz crystals range in size from tiny to about half a meter long (to date). Crystals often show signs of multiple episodes of growth and sometimes Amethyst forms last covering the smoky with small amethyst crystals. Amethyst scepters also occur occasionally on the smoky quartz.

A start
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 25, 2009 08:49AM
Mark, Thanks for the input. We may be back to you later with more questions when we actually get around to writing the article.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 25, 2009 11:12AM
    
Hi Rock

have a number of odd Aussie quartz I can photograph and throw into the mix if desired. I am not much of a scribe but could probably help to find a couple. Attached photo of Ashton Quarry Quartz, Adelaide Hills, South Australia. Is this the type of thing you are looking for ?

Cheers Jon

BTW quartz is approx 5 inches tall, penetration side growths and unusual termination
Attachments:
open | download - DSCF1535_edited.jpg (32.4 KB)
open | download - DSCF1537_edited.jpg (27 KB)
open | download - DSCF1539.jpg (40.5 KB)
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 25, 2009 04:09PM
Jon,
Thats a substantially strange quartz and probably worthy of inclusion in the article. We prefer whole specimen images, but in this case that angled down on the C? face of the quartz would probably also worth showing as a linked image. Certainly not all of the quartz from that locality are like that and we would also want to show what a good "normal" specimen from the locality would look like as well. The person writing the article has the perk of being able to pick out the images for the article. We try to use the best looking one as the main image to illustrate the locality and that image appears at the top of the article and the others as Picture one, two, three etc and those numbers are linked to the other images of specimens from the locality. We also want to get as much info on the specimens from the locality as we can and something of the geology and history of the locality as well.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 26, 2009 09:34PM
Ralph,
Remember, we have a rule here on mindat. No more than 60 hours a week are to be worked on projects here! Did you ever decide about taking on the Atacamite article?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 27, 2009 01:25AM
Rock
Sadly I have to work too, but its a bit of fun cobbling together the info and pictures of an evening.
There are still a lot of holes in the above post but hopefully it will encourage people to fill in the gaps - and fix a few problems like Torrington and Gunnedah/Coonabarrabran/etc.
I am happy to help get Atacamite together too - at least the Australian sites I know - whatever you think is the priority of the day.
I have made a start on Dundasite and stichtite too as I have papers on them I can plagiarise.
Ralph

Regards,
Ralph
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 27, 2009 02:10AM
Ralph,
I would rather let you work on what you find fun to work on rather than assign you work. But if you find yourself running out of things you want to work on, let me know. There will be enough demanding grunt work later in just getting the formatting right and tuning up the text and all the changes that will need to be made by people coming up with good suggestions. It does seem that the more stuff that gets posted here, and the more articles we get out there for people to look at, the more people that will come in with suggestions and wishing to help. There will be I think a lot of people from foreign countries where English is not their first language that would really like to contribute but know their language skills are not up to writing the text in the articles. If they understand that people here will be willing to work with them on the text and clean up their English, I think there will be a lot of work for us in that area too.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 27, 2009 09:43AM
    
Ralph

regarding the smokes with phantoms from Silent Grove near Torrington. These were recovered from an old tin mine known as Silent Grove, the geology is representative of the insitu Cassiterite deposits found throughout that area. Large groups and thousands of single crystals, upto 40cm were collected about a decade ago in a commercal operation to recover Cassiterite specimens for the collector market. Some very impressive Cassiterite clusters to 10cm and single to 4cm were recovered on smokey quartz crystals.
There have been a number of other quartz outcrops producing good specimens in the area exposed following logging and road works. Silent Grove was a working tin mine and from what I have been able to ascertain was first worked in the early 20th century. If you need them, I have more quartz specimens from that deposit that I can supply photo's of.
avatar Re: Quartz, Australia
March 27, 2009 09:54AM
    
Another area you wish to include is Terip Terip in Victoria. Some seven or eight years ago an area measuring 200 x150m was excavated on a pegmatite exposure near Terip Terip, to a depth of about 30m, when pumps could not keep up with the influx of ground waters and work stopped. Dark smoky with good lustre and large gemmy sections were recovered mainly as singles to 50cm, with crystals measuring 20 to 30cm being relatively common. Unfortunately, their recovery has undertaken was a number of well intentioned but inexperienced collectors and the majority of specimens showed significant damage. The largest group I have seen recovered from this deposit measured some 60x 50cm at the base. Again I can supply photos if desired of some of the singles from this operation
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