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Best Minerals, Quartz, USA, Alabama to California

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Best Minerals, Quartz, USA, Alabama to California
August 07, 2009 04:58PM
Click here to view Quartz, Alabama to California here for Quartz from Colorado to Montana here for Quartz from Nebraska to Oklahoma here for Quartz, Oregon to Wyoming, here for Best Minerals Quartz and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.



Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities? After each set of pictures there should be some descriptive text. If none appears it means that we need someone to tell us about the specimens from that locality and something about the geology of the occurrence.




Quartz
SiO2 trigonal

Quartz, East Coleman Mine, Jessieville, Garland Co., Arkansas, USA ~16cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Of all the quartz localities in the United States, certainly the best know are the various localities in Arkansas. They have been producing quartz crystals for more than 100 years and were even used occasionally by the Indians to make arrowheads. They are seen in collections all over the world and production continues today. There are many different varieties of quartz, perhaps amethyst, agate, opal and petrified wood are among the best known. We will try and include them all here. What localities produce the best specimens of quartz and quartz family minerals? Well, certainly the Quartz from Arkansas would have to rank high on the list. Good amethyst specimens are always in demand by collectors, and those from Georgia can sometimes be spectacular, and those from Montana can also be quite nice. Not all varieties of Quartz need to be form in crystals to be highly valuable. Specimens of "gem silica" (agate colored blue by Chrysocolla) from Arizona can bring thousands of dollars per specimen. Though not quartz in a technical sense, we are including opal here because it is chemically very similar to quartz. Fire opal limb casts from Idaho can also bring high prices. Big, meter plus, slabs of fine petrified wood from Arizona can sell for tens of thousands of dollars. Specimens of quartz showing well formed examples of Japan Law twinned quartz are always popular with collectors and in this section of Quartz, Alabama to Montana fine examples from Arkansas and California may be best. Often times the quartz crystals from various localities are nice but not outstanding, but when they occur growing together with other minerals, those specimens can be worth many times what specimens of just the quartz would bring. A prime example of this are the smoky quartz crystals from Colorado that are sometimes found growing with beautiful blue amazonite crystals.

Of all the common minerals, quartz is probably the most durable. On mindat, the most often hit upon mineral is quartz, and on Mindat's Message Board in the Mineral Cleaning and Preparation forum the most commonly asked questions are about hot to clean quartz specimens. You can scrub up your quartz specimens to your hearts content and even subject them to most strong acids without fear of damaging them. You can even cook them in crock pots with out worry. If you want to clean your quartz specimens, here is a link to an article that will tell you all about cleaning your quartz specimens and what you can do and should not do. [www.mindat.org].
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Alabama, Elmore Co.

Quartz, 6.7cm wide© G,De'Young



Quartz
USA
Alabama, Jefferson Co., Pinson, Upper Turkey Creek Tributary

Quartz v. agate, 10cm wide©



Quartz
USA
Alaska, Prince of Wales Island, Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Borough

Quartz, 3.1cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Quartz twin, 2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Epidote, 3.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The specimens pictured above are most likely from one of the Prince of Wales Island localities listed below, but I thought they were interesting enough to include them here even thought they have "lost" their exact localities. The Prince of Wales Island locality is much better know its fine stout black Epidotes than the few quartz specimens it produces. The good Japan Law quartz twin pictured below left may be the best one ever found at the locality and it may be ten times better than the next best one. The locality is remote, and to reach it you have to mount a major expedition or more commonly you hire an airplane that will land you a lake up in the mountains near the mine, camp in a little forest service cabin and each day hike up the mountain to the steep area where the epidote is found and then spend the day, often in the rain working with hand tools to remove the vegetation from the face of the mountain to see if you can expose any pockets of epidote and quartz crystals. The production of specimens from this locality will never be great, and if you have any good ones from there, you should cherish them.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Alaska, Prince of Wales-Outer Ketchikan Borough, Prince of Wales Island, Green Monster Mountain

Quartz twin ~8cm wide©
Quartz twin, ~7cm wide©


Quartz, 4.7cm wide© Chris Tucker
Quartz, 6cm wide© Chris Tucker


Quartz on Epidote, 3.5cm wide© Chris Tucker
Quartz, 5.5cm wide© Chris Tucker


Quartz & Epidote, 4cm tall© Chris Tucker
Quartz & Epidote, 3.5cm wide© Chris Tucker


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Apache Co., Carrizo Mts (Carrizo Range), Chinle District, Chinle area

Quartz v. petrified wood, ~41cm© Joseph A. Freilich, LLC



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Huachuca Mts, Hartford District (Huachuca Mountains District), Ash Canyon, Huachuca placers (Old Timer placers)

Quartz, 2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Cochise Co., Mule Mts, Warren District, Bisbee

Quartz on Chrysocolla 3.5cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Dripping Spring Mts, Banner District, Hayden area, Chilito, Keystone Gulch, Kullman-McCool group), Lee Reagan prospects; Lee Reagan property; Reagan claims (Regan/Reagan Camp prospects; Finch Mine (Barking Spider Mine)

Quartz on Wulfenite, 2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Wulfenite, 5.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz on Wulfenite, 5.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Wulfenite, 5.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Technically speaking the specimens pictured above are really more Wulfenite specimens than quartz specimens and appear here only because the Wulfenite crystals from this locality are commonly coated with drusy quartz. These are rather rare creatures and in spite of having lived and collected in California and Arizona most of my life, I have never managed to get a good one.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Globe-Miami District

Quartz v. "gem chrysocolla" 5.7cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, Chrysocolla & Malachite, 4.9cm© Rob Lavinsky


The piece of gem chrysocolla pictured on the left above would not look quite like that when the miner collected it. The high spots on the specimen have been polished up a bit and that is what makes them shine. If you look down in the valleys between the high spots you can see what was the natural luster of the specimen when it was collected. "Gem Chrysocolla" is almost entirely the chalcedony variety of quartz with just enough Chrysocolla in it to give it a pleasing blue color. Pure Chrysocolla is a pretty blue color, but on exposure it tends to crack and fall apart, but "gem chrysocolla" on the other hand is almost pure chalcedony, quite hard and takes a beautiful polish and is therefore ideal for making cabochons. When just the right amount of Chrysocolla and perhaps other copper minerals are present in the chalcedony, to give it just the right amount of blue color and the right amount of translucency, the price of finished stones for jewelry can be more than $100 per carat. So if you can get a piece of good gem chrysocolla that weighs a kilogram it has the potential of cutting perhaps 1000 carats of finished stones which could sell for $100,000. Thats not bad for a small rock that a miner might bend over and pick out of a blast pile in a large open pit copper mine. At the right time you could probably fill us the back end of a pick up truck in an hour or two and drive off into the sunset and never work another day the rest of your life.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Globe-Miami District, Globe Hills District, Globe Hills, Globe

Quartz on Chrysocolla, 8.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Calcite & Malachite, 11.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Globe-Miami District, Miami-Inspiration District, Inspiration, Miami-Inspiration deposit, Inspiration Mine, Live Oak pit (Keystone; Joe Bush; Ox Hide; Thornton; Red Hill; Cyprus Miami)

Quartz with Chrysocolla, 12.4cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Chrysocolla on Malachite, 4.8cm© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz with Chrysocolla, 7.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz with Chrysocolla, 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz v. chalcedony & chrysocolla, 11.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Drusy quartz growing on Chrysocolla and chalcedony colored blue by chrysocolla has been found at number of copper mines, but perhaps the most impressive locality for this kind of item is Inspiration mine in the Globe-Miami District. The color alone makes many collectors drool uncontrollably and when you add to this the gem value of good quality "gem chrysocolla" and you can come up with some very expensive specimens/cutting rough. Often these specimens are also associate with Malachite ond sometimes other Back on the 1950's the good grade gem Chrysocolla from the Live Oak pit was going for about $100 per pound. Today it can bring several thousand dollars a pound for specimens with just the right color and translucency. Good grade cabochons of "gem chris", can bring prices of $100 per carat. The Taiwanese Chinese are particularly attracted to this material. I have a number of good specimens of this material in my collection, including drusy specimens, but have thus far resisted the temptation of selling them for fear that their fate is most likely the cutters wheel.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Gila Co., Payson District (Green Valley District), Payson, Payson area

3cm tall Quartz xl on matrix© Adam Harper



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Graham Co., Aravaipa District, Santa Teresa Mts.

Quartz, 8.6cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Graham Co., Aravaipa District, Santa Teresa Mts, Klondyke, en Strike Mine (Tenstrike Mine; Ten Strike group; Stone and Dempsey; Klondyke Mining Co.; Lone Pine Lead; Cassidy and Rubal)

Fluorite on Quartz, 7cm wide©



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Graham Co., San Carlos Indian Reservation, Santa Teresa Mts, Stanley District, Quartzite Mountain Garnets), Quartzite Mountain, (Stanley Butte [nearby]

Quartz & Andradite, 5.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Andradite, 7.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 11cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The location of Stanley Buttes has been know to collectors for generations and and is much better know for its good specimens of yellow/brown/green specimens of Andradite garnet specimens. In the early days field collectors collected there pretty much as they pleased but as time passed the reservation Indians started started patrolling the borders of their reservation and kicking field collectors out. Today it is considered off limits to field collectors. Thought specimens of andradite garnets predominate at the locality, some few good specimens of quartz and quartz associated with andradite are produced. The combination specimens of quartz and andradite are really much nicer and more sought after than just the specimens of andradite without associated quartz crystals.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Greenlee Co., Shannon Mts, Copper Mountain District (Clifton-Morenci District), Clifton, San Francisco River area

Quartz druse on chalcedony after cleaning, 13cm wide©
Quartz druse on chalcedony, before cleaning©

The cleaning process in a case like this is fairly straight forward. High pressure water to clean off as much dirt as possible and then immersing the specimen in a solution of "iron out" or oxalic acid will remove any remaining "iron" staining. For a more complete understanding of how to clean quartz and quartz family specimens see [www.mindat.org]
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Colorado River Indian Reservation, Dome Rock Mts, La Paz District (Weaver District), Goodman vein, Goodman Mine group, Gold Belt Mine

Quartz, 3.1cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Dome Rock Mts, Middle Camp-Oro Fino District, Crystal Caverns claim; Big Bertha Extension Mine), Veta Grande claim; Big Bertha Mine (Veta Grande Mine

Quartz & Hematite, 6.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


This locality is almost with in a stones throw of the little desert community of Quartzite. During most of the year the place is nearly abandoned and the few locals that live there survive on the few cars that pull off the interstate to get gas or perhaps some hamburgers. In February, the snow birds descend on the area and the populations swells to tens of thousands with camp trailers and mobile homes creating a traffic jam on the single little main street that runs through the little town. They also carpet the desert for miles around to enjoy the giant out door swap meet and Rockhound pow wow. I don't think this tiny mine has produced a good specimen of quartz and hematite in the last 50 years. It has been beaten to death by field collectors for generations. About 50 years ago you could go there and break up quartz boulders on the dump, and if you were lucky you might find a small specimen of bladed hematite and quartz but you had to be real lucky, and even then I never was able to get one as good at the one pictured here nor did I know anyone who ever found anything that good. Some of the old field collectors in Arizona and southern California might have a nice specimen from there that they collected generations ago, but few of them had any as good at the one pictured. The mine also produced specimens of micro Zunyite crystals frozen in matrix.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, La Paz Co., Plomosa Mts, Plomosa District, Bouse

Quartz, 3.5cm©



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Maricopa Co., Mazatzal Mts, Four Peaks, Four Peaks Amethyst Mine (Arizona Amethyst Mine)

Quartz v. amethyst, 2.5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Quartz, 3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Quartz v. amethyst, 15cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts

This locality is better know for its faceting grade amethyst than the quartz specimens it produces. If the cost of mining were not so high this locality might be a better know amethyst and quartz producing locality than it is.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Maricopa Co., Saddle Mountain

Quartz v. chalcedony, 2cm© 2004 Peter Cristofono
Quartz v. chalcedony, 2.7cm wide© 2004 Peter Cristofono



Quartz v. chalcedony, 2.2cm wide© 2004 Peter Cristofono
Quartz v. chalcedony, 3.3cm wide© 2007 Peter Cristofono



Quartz v. chalcedony, 5cm wide© 2004 Peter Cristofono



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Maricopa Co., Verde Mts, Cave Creek District

Jasper & Hematite 5cm wide© 2007 Peter Cristofono



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Navajo Co., Holbrook

Quartz v. petrified wood, 10.1cm wide© Danny Jones
Quartz v. petrified wood, 12cm wide© John Betts


There is a region near Holbrook, Arizona that is world famous for its petrified wood. In 1906 a portion of this area was set aside as a National Monument and upgraded to a national park in 1962. It is destination that every mineral collector and rockbound should visit. Big colorfully long and chunks of petrified wood litter the surface in many places and though you might not want to put one in your collection you can't help but be impressed. The petrified wood from this locality can vary in color, but is is famous for its red color with occasional spots of pale green and blue. Some of the logs are huge and can reach two meters in diameter. On some of the ranches that surround the park also have abundant deposits of petrified wood on them but over the years the more easily accessible material has been collected and sold. The most highly desired pieces of wood show the original round shape of the tree trunk or limb and when cut and polished have minimal defects in terms of cracks or holes.The more colorful the better. Some logs have produced beautiful "rounds" of more than a meter in diameter and have been sold for more than $10,000 each. I have been told that some of the logs on the privately owned ranches are so big that they can't be moved and that to be cut, they would have to have a big wire saw built on the sight to cut them down into manageable sizes. Some wonderful tables and desk tops have been made from some of these.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Navajo Co., Holbrook District, Joseph City

Quartz v. petrified wood, 5cm wide© 2008 Peter Cristofono


Quartz
USA

Arizona, Navajo Co., Woodruff

Quartz v. petrified wood, 9cm wide© Danny Jones



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Mineral Creek District (Ray District), Hot Tamale Peak, Ray, Ray Mine

Quartz on Chrysocolla, 5.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Chrysocolla, 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz on Chrysocolla on Malachite, 4cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Chrysocolla, 4.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz v. agate on chrysocolla, 2.5cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz v.agate, ~4cm© Wright's Rock Shop



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Galiuro Mts, Bunker Hill District (Copper Creek District), Copper Creek (Copper Creek Canyon), Copper Creek

Quartz xls with oriented twins, ~3cm wide©


A few Japan law quartz twins were collected here, but they never looked like very much. The one pictured here with its probably oriented twins may the the champion of all the specimens collected at the locality.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Pinal Co., Mineral Mountain District, Mineral Mountain area

Quartz v. amethyst, ~2.5cm wide© Adam Harper



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Santa Cruz Co., Patagonia Mts, Patagonia District, Duquesne (Washington Camp)

Quartz v. amethyst 11.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz xls with twin, 5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz twin, 3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz v. amethyst, 5.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz twins, 5.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Calcite ~7.5cm wide©


Quartz twin ~20cm wide©
Quartz v. amethyst, 3.5cm © Dan Weinrich


Quartz twins, 6.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Washington Camp is now a ghost down in southern Arizona and in 1920, probably its high point, had a population of about 5000 people with their economy bases on mining in the area. Since the early 50s the locality has been know to collectors for the broad array of quartz specimens that it produced, many of them from underground. It is probably best know for specimens of Quartz Japan law twins found there, some of them with "ears" as much as 20 cm and perhaps even more. In the early days the locals did know know about Japan law twinning in quartz and all the specimens were more or less equal. Dick Bideaux of Tucson told the story that once when he and his father were visiting the camp, they went into the one little general store where the owner/operator George Gerard was selling quartz specimens from the mine for $2 per pound. Even as a young age, Dick knew what Japan law twins were and they gleefully went thorough his inventory of quartz specimens and picked out all the good ones with Japan law twins. Later George Gerard closed his little general store, moved to Yuma Arizona and became a wholesale mineral dealer, mostly selling flats of cheap tourist rocks to rock shops. Some of the Quartz Japan law twins show quartz crystals twinned multiple times and make for very interesting specimens.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Santa Cruz Co., Scepter Hill

Quartz scepter, 2.7cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co.

Quartz after halite, 4cm wide©



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., Bradshaw Mts (Bradshaw Range), Piedmont Mine (Congress West Mine; West Congress Mine; Copper Creek Mine; Copper Queen claims; Bloody Basin Mineral Development Co. property)

Quartz v. chrysocolla v. gem silica, 7.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., Bradshaw Mts (Bradshaw Range), Pine Grove District, Crown King, Lane Mountain, Fat Jack Mine

Quartz v. amethyst scepter, 3.0cm© 2002 John H. Betts
Quartz v. amethyst scepter, 10.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., Date Creek Mts, Date Creek quartz crystal locality

Quartz v. amethyst scepters, 5.3cm wide© Dan Weinrich
Quartz v. amethyst scepters, 7.5cm © Dan Weinrich


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., Eureka District, Bagdad

Quartz on Chrysocolla, 8.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
Arizona, Yavapai Co., New River Station area, Agua Fria River

Quartz v. chalcedony after anhydrite, 5.8cm tall© Rizzo



Quartz
Arkansas

Most of the quartz specimens from Arkansas are found in the Ouachita Mountains some of which extend into Oklahoma and some good quartz specimens are found in Oklahoma, but they are not nearly as well known as those from Arkansas. Though the quartz crystals from these localities have been known for more than 100 years it was not till the advent of World War II and the need for quartz radio oscillator plates of untwinned quartz for the control of radio frequencies that the area was heavily investigated for untwinned quartz crystals. Some were produced but the main source of this type of quartz was found in Brazil and hundreds of tons of Brazilian quartz were imported for this purpose and also used to build the US national strategic stock pile of quartz. This stock pile has recently been sold off because suitable quartz can now be grown in large stainless steel autoclaves more economically. The Arkansas deposits occur throughout the thick, deformed Paleozoic shales, sandstones, and cherts exposed along the central belt of the Ouachita Mountains. Steeply dipping fractures closely related to the major folds control the deposition of most quartz. Most of the crystals are transparent only at their tips and grade into translucent to white quartz near their bases. There are also localities for quartz crystals in Hot Spring, Pike, Pope, Pulaski, Sevier and, Yell counties. In Mount Ida (Montgomery County), Ocus Stanley began the modern mining of quartz in 1930 and this is generally considered to be the heart of the quartz country. Ocus Stanely was sort of considered to be the grandfather of quartz specimen dealers in Arkansas.

Most of the quartz crystals found in Arkansas are rather simple hexagonal prismatic quartz with few associated minerals. Sometimes the quartz crystals from there have green inclusions of chlorite group minerals that can produce "green" quartz and quartz crystals with striking green phantoms. Some calcite has been found as well as specimens with little rough crystals of Ankerite. Some quartz specimens can reach more than a meter in diameter and the maximum crystals size may approach a meter in length, but the best specimens are usually much smaller. A few striding specimens exhibiting Japan law twinning have been found and one spectacular specimen recently on display at Tucson may have sold in the six figure range. Probably the finest quartz from Arkansas have been found at the McEarl mine.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co.

Irradiated smoky Quartz, 28cm wide© 1

The specimen of smoky quartz above is not a natural specimen. It has been exposed to gamma rays and turned a dark smoky black. A certain small percentage of Arkansas quartz specimens is sent to companies that sterilize food by the use of cobalt 60 generated gamma rays to turn the quartz from white to almost a black. Most of the time not very good specimens of quartz is used for this purpose, because collectors frown on treated and "enhanced" specimens and the better grade specimens will bring more in their natural state. A small amount of aluminium in the structure of the quartz that sometimes replaces a small percentage of silicon in the structure allow the radiation to create the smoky color in quartz. The radiation treatment can be controlled to give any degree of smoky color desired but this is rarely done, and the quartz that is treated just gets "blasted" and turned almost black in color.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co., Blue Springs, McEarl Mine

Quartz, 5.2cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich

In the 1990s a find of quartz at this locality produced some specimens that many consider to be the worlds best specimen quartz. The crystals were long and prismatic, transparent and exceptionally shiny. Often the striations on the prism faces were spaced just so that they seem to act as diffraction gratings and create subtle rainbow colors along the length of the prisms. Crystals up to about 30 cm were found and brought thousands of dollars each. Collectors as well as the new age people went nuts over these things. I hope some day we may be able to show good pictures of some of these specimens rather tan the nice but comparatively rather sad little specimens shown here.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co., Blue Springs, Miller Mountain Mine (New Coleman Mine; Jimmy Coleman Mine)

Quartz, 8cm tall© Bruce T. Mitchell
Quartz, uncleaned, 2.8cm© 2007 Peter Cristofono


I have visited some of these mines, but really don't know enough about them to do justice describing them and the specimens that come from them. I hope that some real Arkansas quartz guy will step up and help with the descriptions of the various Arkansas quartz localities that we talk about here.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co., Crystal Mountain, Monte Cristo Mines

Quartz, 12.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co., Jessieville, East Coleman Mine (Ron Coleman Mine; Old Coleman Mine; West Chance; Dierks No. 4; Blocker Lead; Geomex)

Quartz, 12.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 17.4cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz cluster, 17.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 19.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 15.6cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz cluster ~48cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Garland Co., Crystal Springs

Quartz, 15cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Quartz, 10.7cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Hot Spring Co.

Quartz, 10.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 7.6cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts
Quartz, 8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 7.0cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 8.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 9.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 7.0cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz with phantoms, 6.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 7.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Montgomery Co., Mt Ida

Quartz, 2cm wide© 2000 John H. Betts
Quartz, 5cm wide© 2000 John H. Betts


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Montgomery Co., Mt Ida, Blue Phantom Mine

Quartz, 6.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Montgomery Co., Mt Ida, Collier Creek Mine

© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Montgomery Co., Mt Ida, Ocus Stanley's Mine

Quartz, 17cm wide©



Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Pulaski Co., Jeffrey, Jeffrey Quarry

Quartz, 3cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich
Quartz, 3.5cm wide© 2003 John H. Betts


Quartz, 10.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Few quartz localities in Arkansas produce specimens as distinctive as those from the Jeffrey Quarry. They are very distinctive clusters of tiny long prismatic crystals that were always popular with collectors. The locality has been inactive for many years now.
[Rock Currier 2009]

Quartz
USA
Arkansas, Saline Co., Paron

Quartz, 6.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 3.3cm tall© 2003 John H. Betts




Quartz
USA
California, Alameda Co., Berkeley, Spruce Street Thunder Egg Locality

Quartz v. chalcedony thunder egg, 7cm wide©



Quartz
USA
California, Butte Co., Paradise

Quartz, 11cm tall© 2003 John H. Betts



Quartz
USA
California, Calaveras Co., New Melones Dam

Quartz & Axinite, 6cm tall© 2005 Jake Harper



Quartz
USA
California, El Dorado Co., Georgetown District

Doubly terminated Quartz, 6cm© 2005 Jake Harper
Doubly terminated Quartz, 6.3cm wide© 2005 Jake Harper


Quartz
USA
California, El Dorado Co., Shingle Springs Mine (Docs Mine)

Quartz, 3.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 8.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz, 3.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, Fresno Co., Dinkey Creek Mine

Quartz v. smoky, 7.4cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz v. smoky, 7.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
California, Inyo Co., Bishop, Mount Morgan, Pine Creek Mine

Quartz cast, 5.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz cast, 15.5cm wide© Russell G. Rizzo
Quartz cast ~7cm wide©


Quartz
USA
California, Inyo Co., Deep Spring Valley Area, Crystal Hill

Quartz, 8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, Inyo Co., Saline Valley

Quartz xls. with twin, ~7cm wide©
Quartz xls with twin, !7cm wide©


Quartz xls with twin, ~12cm wide©
Quartz xls with twins, ~8cm wide©


Quartz crystals with twins, ~12cm wide©
Quartz xls with twin ~10cm wide©


Quartz v. smoky, 6.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 5.6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz v. smoky, 9.5cm wide© Russell G. Rizzo


There are two quartz localities in the Saline valley. The one that produces the Japan law twins is really not down in the valley, but located high up in the the north end of Nelson range of mountains that bracket the Saline valley on its south end. They were found in a little copper prospect by Robert Bartsch of Pasadena California and with the help of Dr. Gary Novak the bulk of the fine specimens were collected. The locality was a skarn deposit that also produces some not very remarkable epidote and garnet specimens. The locality was very steep and down off the crest of the mountain. A wooden platform had to be built so that a few holes for explosives could be drilled. One of the better specimens had two in echelon six inch twins was destroyed during the cleaning process. Fewer than 50 good specimens were collected. The other Saline valley quartz locality produces nice smoky quartz crystals, though mostly as single crystals. This locality is located toward the north end of the valley a bit west of the road. Many of the crystals exhibit good left and right handedness and were abundant enough that several hundred pair were collected and sold to a mineral of the month club. The largest crystal from the find was about 20 cm, but as usual, the better specimens were substantially smaller.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, Lassen Co., Petersen Mountain (Hallelujah Junction), Crystal Tips No. 2 pit

Quartz v. amethyst scepter, 4.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz scepter, 7.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz v. ame. scepter, 10.7cm © Rob Lavinsky
Quartz v. amethyst scepter, 7.2cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Petersen Mountain actually straddles the state line between California and Nevada and specimens have been found in both states. In the Quartz, USA article that includes Nevada, more pictures are shown. The locality has been dug by generations of collectors and recently in a more organized manner by claim holders. The locality is often called Hallelujah Junction after a wide spot in the road that used to be the location of a small general store. The locality is famous for the fine quartz scepters that are found at the locality, some of which are smoky and some of which are of amethyst.
[Rock Currier, 2009]


Quartz
USA
California, Mariposa Co., Hornitos

Quartz, 14.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, Mariposa Co., Whitlock District, Colorado, Colorado Mine (Colorado Quartz Mine)

Quartz, 4cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts


Quartz
USA
California, Napa Co., Knoxville

Quartz v. chalcedony v. Myrickite, ~15cm wide©

Myrickite is a variety of chalcedony that contains Cinnabar which give it a red color. Some of this material can be cut into cabochons that are very pretty. The piece shown here is not exceptional to any degree. The name comes from Myrick Spring, in San Bernardino Co., California where it was first found.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
California, Nevada Co., California Placer

Quartz v. petrified wood, 15cm wide© Danny Jones


Quartz
USA
California, Plumas Co.

Quartz, Schorl & Muscovite, 5.1cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, Schorl & Muscovite, 5.1cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., Cahuilla District

Quartz scepters, 4cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Muscovite, 9.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., Cahuilla District, Bautista Canyon, Crown Jewel Mine

Quartz & Muscovite, 3.9cm tall© 2006 SLR
Quartz & Muscovite, 8.6cm tall© 2001 SLR


Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., Cahuilla District, Cahuilla Mountain (Coahuila), Fano Mine (Fano-Simmons; Simmons; Little Blue; Big Pink)

Quartz on Albite, 4.9cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich



Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., Cahuilla District, Little Cahuilla Mountain, Audrey Lynn Mine

Quartz, citrine/smoly, 11.4cm tall© 2003 SLR
Quartz, Albite & Mica, 12.7cm tall© 2004 SLR


Smoky Quartz, 9.5cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz on Dravite, 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., USG Wollastonite Mine

Quartz crystals, 16cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, San Bernardino Co., Calico District

Quartz v. chalcedony desert rose, 4.6cm tall© The-Vug.com

This type of desert rose is found in a number of localities across the south west. Frequently they are white to pink in color after cleaning and frequently fluoresce a nice green color under UV light.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Bernardino Co., Kingston District, Beck Deposits (Kingston Iron Deposit; Kingston Range; Iron Gossam; Beck Mine)

Quartz v. amethyst, 5.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz v. amethyst, 4.6cm© Russell G. Rizzo


Quartz
USA
California, San Bernardino Co., Kingston Range, Purple Heart Mine

Quartz v. amethyst, 9.7cm wide© 2009 EMC

These specimens look pretty good, but these are exceptional for the locality and most of the specimens the locality has produced are not nearly this good and you usually have to work very hard for what you get. Compared to the tons of better amethyst specimens that are produced annually from the basalts of Roi Grande do Sul, these specimens represent a good recreational outing with lots of hard work for the people who collected them. The localities are represented by some shallow surface workings and probably not be dignified with the name of Mine.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
California San Bernardino Co., Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center - Twentynine Palms, Bullion Mts (Bullion Range)

Agate, cut and polished ~3.8cm wide© Puckdt

The is on the big US. Marine core training facility near 29 Palms, California. The Bullion Mountains are entirely within the Marine core training base. The loclaiyt is in a small side canyon on the north side of the range that does not have a name. The locality has been closed for many years. Back in the 1950s the locality was sometimes open on Saturdays to collectors. The mountains are Miocine volcanics.
[Jim Puckett 2012}


Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Jacumba District, Mt. Tule, Pack Rat Mine

Quartz, Spessartine on Albite, 10.4cm© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Mica on Albite, 7.8cm wide© 2003 SLR



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Mesa Grande District, Gem Hill, Himalaya Mine (Himalaya pegmatite; Himalaya dikes)

Quartz on Microcline, 7.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz & Elbaite, 5.6cm wide© Eric Graff


Quartz, citrine/smoky, 19.4cm tall© 2004 SLR

The Himalaya Pegmatite is well known to collectors for the fine pink and green doubly terminated tourmaline crystals that is produces. Good matrix specimens are rare and they almost always consist of tourmaline crystals growing on quartz. The pegmatite is not known for its quartz crystals, but it has produced some good specimens. The specimens pictured here are not particularly outstanding.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Chief Mountain, Elizabeth R. Mine

Quartz, 3.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 20.0cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Chief Mountain, Pala Chief Mine (MS 6452)

Quartz, 19 cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Quartz, 13.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


The Pala Chief mine is better know for its specimens of kunzite but it has produced some pretty good quartz specimens and the ones shown here are quite fine. They are not abundant and probably fewer than fifty of this quality have been found.
[Rock Currier 209]


Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Hiriart Mountain (Heriart; Heriot; Hiriat Hill), Dawson Prospect

Quartz, 26cm tall© 2003 SLR



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Hiriart Mountain (Heriart; Heriot; Hiriat Hill), Katerina Mine (Katrina; Catherin; Caterina)

Quartz on Albite, 7.8cm tall© Russell G. Rizzo



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Hiriart Mountain (Heriart; Heriot; Hiriat Hill), White Queen Mine

Montmorillonite in Quartz, 14.5cm tall© Russell G. Rizzo
Montmorillonite in Quartz, 12.7cm wide© 2003 SLR
Montmorillonite in Quartz, tallest=18.2cm tall© 2003 SLR


Montmorillonite in Quartz, 5.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

This mine has produced a good quantity of large quartz crystals, most of which have inclusions of pink Montmorillonite. Their virtue is perhaps best displayed when these crystals are cut open and polished. Norm Dawson who operated the mine for many years had a yard full of the crystals. He found that cutting them in half and polishing them provided more financially rewarding than just selling the natural crystals. The mine is much better know for the wonderful morganite Beryl specimens that it produces.
[Rock Currier, 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Tourmaline Queen Mountain (Pala; Queen), Stewart Mine (MS 6162; Stewart Lithia)

Quartz on lepidolite on Albite, ~11cm wide©
Elbaite on Quartz, 6cm tall© 2005 SLR


The pegmatite is better know for its pink tourmalines and massive lepidolite shot through with tiny pink tourmaline than it is for its quartz specimens. It did produce a few pleasant specimens like this one but most of the pockets encountered in the mine especially the ones that produced pink tourmaline were pretty badly churned and crushed and good terminated specimens were rather rare.
[Rock Currier 2009]

Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Tourmaline Queen Mountain (Pala; Queen), Tourmaline King Mine (MS 4500; MS 4926; Gem)

Quartz, 4.2cm tall© 2005 SLR

The Tourmaline King mine produce a few specimen early in the 20th Century but after an initial find near the surface extensive mining on deeper levels produce nothing but blank granite. Specimens of any kind from this locality are rare.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Pala District, Tourmaline Queen Mountain (Pala; Queen), Tourmaline Queen Mine (MS 6458; Tourmaline Queen No. 3)

Quartz & Elbaite, 12cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

The Tourmaline Queen mine has a long history of producing good specimens of tourmaline. In the 1972 a wonderful find of "blue cap" tourmalines were found, some of them growing with quartz crystals. Though not particularly know for its quartz specimens it did produce some respectable specimens.
[Rock Currier 2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Ramona District, Hercules Mine (Hercules Prospect; Hercules Group; Beryl Claim)

Smoky Quartz point, 9cm tall© 2005 SLR



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Ramona District, Little Three Mine (Little 3)

Smoky Quartz, 9.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Smoky Quartz, 9.4cm tall© 2003 SLR


Smoky Quartz on Albite, 5.7cm© Rob Lavinsky

The little three mine like all of the pegmatites in San Diego County, did produce some quartz crystals. Some of them are quite nice if not spectacular. The mine is better know for its specimens of Spessartine garnets.
[Rock Currier2009]



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Warner Springs District, Carmelita Mine (MS 6130; Blue Gem; French Pete; Elinor; Crest Gem)

Smoky quartz point, 11.2cm tall© 2004 SLR
Quartz, center piece 4.1cm tall© 2006 SLR



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Warner Springs District, Chihuahua Valley, Blue Lady Mine (Blue Tourmaline Claim; San Diego Group; Blue Bell Deposit)

Smoky Quartz & Schorl, 6.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Warner Springs District, Cryo-Genie Mine (Cindy B-Cryogenie; Lost Valley Truck Trail Prospect)

Quartz & Elbaite, 10.1cm wide© 2005 SLR
Quartz, 9.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Quartz & Tourmaline, 1.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

A pegmatite that has been worked on and off for years. In its most recent incarnation Bart Cannon of Seattle, Washington put a claim on it and eventually the claim fell into the hands of the Gochenour family and they worked the mine for several years and found a fine pocket of pink torumaline at least one of which is proudly displayed in the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History. It did produce some few good quartz specimens, but nothing that would make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window.
[Rock Currier 2009]


Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Warner Springs District, Chihuahua Valley, Carmelita Mine (Big Spring mine; Blue Gem claim; Crest Gem mine; Elinor deposit; Elinor mine; Estudillo mine; French Pete mine; MS 6130; Peter Cabat mine)

Citrine quartz point, 11.2cm tall© 2004 SLR
Quartz, center crystal 4.1cm tall© 2006 SLR
.
Quartz, 2.4cm© g.slak 2009

The Carmelita mine, sometimes referred to as the 'French Pete', was discovered on April 29th, 1907 by John Peter Labat (Jean Pierre Labat). The deposit is a large rare-earth-element pegmatite that contains pockets of gemstones including tourmaline, beryl and quartz. Labat developed several shallow interconnecting underground workings searching for gem tourmaline, the primary mineral of economic importance at the mine. According to available records, original mining operations had ceased sometime around 1915. The deposit was later worked by several parties from the early 1930's up until the late 1980's, although most of the specimens recovered prior to the early 1990's weren't properly documented, and few labels exist in old collections. Quartz is by far the most common pocket mineral found at the mine, but extremely well formed specimens of relatively rare. Many of the quartz crystals are associated with matrices of cleavelandite and microcline, and sometimes studded or included with colored tourmaline or other associations such as aquamarine, morganite and spessartine. The color of the quartz can range from a soft white to gray, yellow to deep brown, and occasionally jet black. Individual crystal points weighing up to 20kg have been found, but most of the crystals recovered are smaller and extremely well formed. Clear quartz as rough has been utilized for lapidary purposes, and some collections include examples of faceted stones, cabochons and carvings.
[Scott Ritchie 2011]


Quartz var. chalcedony var. Morgan Hill Jasper or Poppy Jasper
USA
California, Santa Clara Co., Paradise Valley, Morgan Hill

4cm cabochon of Morgan Hill jasper© minresco.com
30 cm block of Morgan Hill jasper© minresco.com

Polished Morgan Hill jasper ~6cm wide© minresco.com
Rough Morgan Hill jasper ~10cm wide© minresco.com

Morgan Hill jasper ~8cm tall©
~6cm sphere of Morgan Hill jasper© Paul J. Broyles 2010

Prompted by a friend, who owned a rock shop, digging Morgan Hill orbicular jasper is how we originally got started in the mineral business. While still in high school, in 1957, Sharon and I would collect jasper to provide the financing for our teenage needs. But, it soon became more than that, as we purchased a 24" saw and took out ads in Lapidary Journal to market the stone. We expanded our search for locations to dig at and located at least 6 different spots ranging over a distance of perhaps 10 miles. The ranchers were fairly friendly at that time and it wasn't too hard to get permission to dig, and we always had small gifts of appreciation for them. There were several off limits locations that were too tempting for a teenager to resist, but those were misadventures that shouldn't be mentioned here, though they make great stories. We gradually shifted our interests from lapidary to minerals but lapidary material, primarily several tons of poppy jasper, funded a large part of my first college years.

50+ years have passed and we have a friend that owns property in Morgan Hill. Her husband, a noted mineral collector, has passed. He was never interested in jasper, so he didn't pay much attention the small pieces found in the horse coral. Two years ago, she brought in a backhoe and mined about a ton of material, which she offered at the CA Fed Show. So, there is recent material on the market that has been legally obtained. Unfortunately, the lady was plagued with problems associated with everyone involved, from the diggers to distribution and buyers. With these kinds of problems and the possibility of lawsuits, it's easy to see why people who have material on their property are reluctant, or even hostile, towards giving permission to dig.

Some samples of the types of orbicular jasper that we found are shown in the attached images. The first is an 80lb memento those "good old days" that I could never bring myself to sell. The orbs are about 1" in diameter. The others are from different locations, but not representative of all the places that we collected. Someone mentioned Anderson Dam, in this thread, and even though I have spent weeks searching there I have never found true orbicular jasper. The last image is of a stone, that did come from Anderson that we marketed back then as Ojo Stone. This is not orbicular jasper, but a silicified claystone breccia.
[Gene Cisneros 2010]



Click here to view Quartz, Alabama to California here for Quartz from Colorado to Montana here for Quartz from Nebraska to Oklahoma here for Quartz, Oregon to Wyoming, here for Best Minerals Quartz and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 21 time(s). Last edit at 04/26/2013 03:15PM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
August 07, 2009 06:26PM
    
fire opal from Idaho - in intro section - not quartz.

On mindat, the most often hit upon mineral is quartz, and on Mindat's Message Board in the Mineral Cleaning and Preparation forum the most commonly asked questions are about hot how to clean quartz specimens.


Four Peaks Amethyst Mine (Arizona Amethyst Mine) - produced a lot of facet grade amethyst (rivals best of the Siberian amethyst)
Anonymous User
Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
August 26, 2009 01:43AM
Hi Rock,

This post is regarding your statement "The Tourmaline King mine produce a few specimen early in the 20th Century but after an initial find near the surface extensive mining on deeper levels produce nothing but blank granite. Specimens of any kind from this locality are rare."

Specimens are indeed rare from here, but the rest of this statement is not factually correct, as there is no place in the mine in which solid pegmatite was not encountered at depth along the dip and strike. During our initial excavation at the bottom of the deposit at the Canyon Cut adit in 2003, we discovered several good sized pockets in virgin pegmatite with perfectly formed quartz crystals of near flawless clarity measuring up to 5 inches in length, no more than 10 feet back from the original surface contours. Even the quartz in the photo you used here was produced in 2003 from virgin pegmatite in situ.

At the lowest levels of the mine which were constructed during R.M. Wilke's tenure, several large pods of montmorillonite were encountered that contained gemstones. Case in point, In July of 1925, California State Mineralogist Lloyd L. Root reported that Wilke’s operations had produced considerable amounts of lepidolite, morganite, tourmaline and kunzite.

Scott



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/28/2009 10:23AM by Scott L. Ritchie.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
August 30, 2009 12:53AM
Scott,
Thanks for the correction. I was dredging up memories of pounding on rocks with little successes there from about 30 years ago. If you have other pictures of some of the quartz specimens there, I would be pleased if you would upload some and Ill use them to amend the article. If you have any other comments and or additions about quartz specimens from anywhere in the USA I would be pleased to hear about them.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
July 09, 2010 01:58PM
When I view this page, I see the text superimposed over some of the photos. Do others see it this way too, or is it the fault of my browser?
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
July 09, 2010 03:00PM
    
Looks fine to me in Firefox and Safari.
Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
July 09, 2010 03:13PM
I'm using Safari, and I still see text covering a couple of the photos for Mariposa Co., CA.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
July 09, 2010 05:52PM
Alfredo,
I have seen this on some computers using various browsers, but using chrome browser here at home it always looks OK and OK when I use window explorer. I have seen it happen sometimes when using chrome on some of my computers down at work. I can sometimes correct it by fiddling with the zoom function on the browsers. I think is must be some sort of incomparability between the browsers and mindat. These kinds of problems are a bitch to figure out and correct I think.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
August 15, 2010 02:50AM
    
Quartz
USA
California, Riverside Co., USG Wollastonite Mine

Clicks through to a zircon locality in Norway. Looks like a zircon to boot.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
August 15, 2010 07:37AM
Jim, I don't understand your post. It would appear that the locality you specify has no photos in the Mindat database. Can you give me the image number?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
March 22, 2011 10:19PM
    
Rock,

I would like administrative access to the Best Minerals project so I can add/edit to the articles for the Carmelita mine and Tourmaline King mine, and also help out with the other pegmatite localities in southern California featured here.

Scott
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
March 23, 2011 01:32AM
Scott,

See my remarks at the end of the Beryl article.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
April 15, 2011 10:45PM
    
Quartz
USA
California, San Diego Co., Warner Springs District, Chihuahua Valley, Carmelita Mine (Big Spring mine; Blue Gem claim; Crest Gem mine; Elinor deposit; Elinor mine; Estudillo mine; French Pete mine; MS 6130; Peter Cabat mine)

Citrine quartz point, 11.2cm tall© 2004 SLR
Quartz, center crystal 4.1cm tall© 2006 SLR
.
Quartz, 2.4cm© g.slak 2009

The Carmelita mine, sometimes referred to as the 'French Pete', was discovered on April 29th, 1907 by John Peter Labat (Jean Pierre Labat). The deposit is a large rare-earth-element pegmatite that contains pockets of gemstones including tourmaline, beryl and quartz. Labat developed several shallow interconnecting underground workings searching for gem tourmaline, the primary mineral of economic importance at the mine. According to available records, original mining operations had ceased sometime around 1915. The deposit was later worked by several parties from the early 1930's up until the late 1980's, although most of the specimens recovered prior to the early 1990's weren't properly documented, and few labels exist in old collections. Quartz is by far the most common pocket mineral found at the mine, but extremely well formed specimens of relatively rare. Many of the quartz crystals are associated with matrices of cleavelandite and microcline, and sometimes studded or included with colored tourmaline or other associations such as aquamarine, morganite and spessartine. The color of the quartz can range from a soft white to gray, yellow to deep brown, and occasionally jet black. Individual crystal points weighing up to 20kg have been found, but most of the crystals recovered are smaller and extremely well formed. Clear quartz as rough has been utilized for lapidary purposes, and some collections include examples of faceted stones, cabochons and carvings.

*Rock, is this the format you want?

Scott



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 04/16/2011 09:47PM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
April 16, 2011 10:14PM
Scott,
OK, OK...now you are starting to talk to me! Yes, what you did was quite good. I tweaked the images a little bit. Subtracted about 20 pixels from the width of each of the second and third images to equalize the space between the images and make the bottom of the third line up with the bottom of the first. You even picked up on adding the . (period) after the second image to make a space below the second and third Images. I have added your contribution to the Quartz article and added your name at the bottom along with the year, this year that is. If you wish, you can select the period and then use the font size control to change the size of the font used and that will allow you to adjust the space between the images a bit.

Now show me something else a bit more extensive. Pick out a mineral of your own and do the best minerals article on it. I would suggest something, perhaps like Stibiotantalite or one of the less common pegmatite minerals that occur in San Diego county. Do a search on the mindat gallery for all the images that we have of it, and not just San Diego County, and select the images you want to use from the various localities and write up that mineral as well as you can. If you do as well on that as you did on that entry you did on the French Pete mine. Ill make you a moderator for best minerals and turn you loose to add and correct errors or inaccuracies that are in the articles. Don't be afraid to ask for help. Usually when you take on a broader topic it forcefully brings home to you how much you don't know. If you would like to modify the format a bit for various reasons, talk to us about it and perhaps we will agree to changes. We are not married to what we have already done, but we do need to exercise some editorial control over the thing or it will really become even a greater quagmire.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
April 24, 2011 08:39PM
    
Hi Rock,

Per your request, I'll get to work on the best minerals article for stibiotantalite.

Scott
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
April 25, 2011 09:26PM
Scott,
Great, welcome on board. I have opened a thread on Stibiotantalite. Just use a reply field there to do your work. I have sort of put in the bare bones of a place holder for the species. When you get your article wiped into shape, Ill delete that place holder and your article will be the main one for that species. If you are lucky, others will see you working on it and chip in with more good images, information and suggestions.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
anyone that has info on veta mineing co back in 1919 , i hold some stock tryin to see if it has any value >?? be nice even if only find out what happened to it , may be tied ot big bertha mineing /co ?? hope i get some answers ??
Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
November 26, 2012 01:47AM
    
these two big quartz crystals are made the same as the two smaller quartz crystals found in the same hole in the snow camp mine,chatham co,north carolina 1962
avatar Re: Best Minerals, Quartz, Alabama to California
November 26, 2012 06:43AM
Bill, we might be able to use them in the article, but first you would have to add them to mindat's gallery and not just as an attachment to a message post.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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