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Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 08, 2012 10:12AM
First Edition: David Von Bargen 2011
Second Edition: Rock Currier June 2012


Click here to view Best Minerals Fluorite, Alaska to Kentucky and here to view Best Minerals Fluorite and here for Best Minerals, Fluorite Best Minerals F and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.


Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?



Fluorite
USA
Missouri, Washington Co., Sullivan, Pea Ridge Mine

Fluorite 4.1cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals



Fluorite
USA
Nevada, Douglas Co., Wellington District, Boulder Hill mine

Fluorite 9.7cm wide© Fabre
Fluorite 7.4cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals

Fluorite 7.5cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Fluorite 21.8cm wide© Weinrich

Fluorite 6.3cm wide© Weinrich Minerals, Inc.
Fluorite 4cm wide© JSS

Fluorite~5cm wide© Alan Goldstein
Fluorite ~8cm wide© Alan Goldstein


Fluorite
USA
Nevada, Esmeralda Co.

Fluorite 8.2cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 9.4cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals

Fluorite 10.7cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Fluorite 21cm wide© Weinrich
.
Fluorite 19.5cm wide© Weinrich Minerals, Inc.


Fluorite
USA
Nevada, Mineral Co., Buena Vista District, Wild Rose Mine (Mt. Montgomery Mine; Red Rose Mine; Starlight group)

Fluorite 2.6cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals



Fluorite
USA
New Hampshire, Carroll Co., Conway

Fluorite 7cm wide© Joseph Polityka
Fluorite 20cm tall© Rob Lavinsky


Fluorite
USA
New Hampshire, Carroll Co., Conway, Redstone

Fluorite 10cm wide© Henry Minot 2012
Fluorite 8cm wide© Henry Minot 2009


Fluorite
USA
USA, New Hampshire, Cheshire Co., Westmoreland

Fluorite ~6cm tall©
Fluorite ~6cm wide©

Fluorite ~5cm wide©


Fluorite
USA
[bNew Hampshire, Cheshire Co., Westmoreland, Stoddard Mine[/b]

Fluorite 13cm tall© 2007 Peter Cristofono


The Stoddard mine was operated commercially by the American Wire and Steel Company, a subsidiary of the U. S. Steel Company, from 1911 to 1923. The fluorite apparently was sent to the Waukegan Works wire mill located along the shore of Lake Michigan. This mill produced barbed wire and was built in 1891. The Stoddard still has plenty of fluorite although it also has an abundance of quartz. I have been unable to discover why production stopped in 1923; it's too early for the Great Depression. Perhaps U. S. Steel decided to shift its supply source to the Illinois/Kentucky area because the transportation costs would have been lower and , I imagine, the new source was richer in fluorite. I hope this is helpful; it might be important to remind collectors that many sources of fine minerals started as commercial operations. In Westmoreland's case the Wise Mine was not as important commercially but much more important from a collector's standpoint because of its superior color. To my knowledge it was never operated as a specimen mine because almost all of the fluorite was pale green, translucent and not well crystallized. People collected there for many years just because the fluorite is so abundant. The owner closed the property several years ago after an overzealous collector from NY created 6 or 7 huge holes he didn't bother to fill. He did unearth several pieces of original mining equipment. The most interesting specimens I have are small, hoppered "spheres" and 2 sets of small transparent cubes with purple edges.
[Don Swenson 2012]


Fluorite
USA
New Hampshire, Cheshire Co., Westmoreland, William Wise Mine

Fluorite 7cm wide© Joseph Polityka
Fluorite 5.5 cm wide© Weinrich

Fluorite 6.8cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 8.9cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite 13cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Quartz 11.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 15.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 10.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 8.7cm wide©

Vein material is commonly available, but well formed individual crystals are rare.


Fluorite
USA
New Jersey, Sussex Co., Franklin Mining District, Franklin

Fluorite in Calcite ~12cm wide©


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Colorado & Utah
Hydrothermal veins

Significant production has occurred in Colorado and New Mexico. Commercial production has also been recorded from Utah (250,000 tons), Montana (Crystal Mountain deposits 556,000 tons), and Nevada (575,000 tons). New Mexico fluorite production has been 650,000 tons, primarily as veins in sedimentary and igneous rocks as a result of hydrothermal deposition. These occurrences are primarily found in the southwestern portion of the state although the '27' vein in the Zuni Mts produced ~ 224,000 tons of fluorite. Fluorite has been found In pegmatites in the Petaca District, Rio Aribba Co., New Mexico. There are crudely faced crystals that reach 7 feet across. Well that is what is reported in the literature by Dr. Richard Jahns in his USGS Professional paper on the Petaca district. These were very crude crystals indeed and were in many case not all that different in color and texture of the mine tunnels in which they were encountered. I have never seen a specimen of fluorite crystals from the Petaca district. There was never enough of this fluorite to be mined commercially.
[David Von Bargen & Rock Currier 2012]


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Bernalillo Co., Tijeras Canyon District, Galena King Mine

Fluorite & drusy Quartz 17cm wide© A&M
Fluorite 6cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite 8.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


The Galena King/Octaroon/Frustration mines were mined for lead. An attempt was made in the 1940's to mine the Galena King for fluorite but I do not believe any ore was shipped. The Galena King has two adits (lower and Upper) with a connecting winze and a winze in the lower adit and a shallow shaft above the upper adit. a decline above and to the north of the trench. It is probably only 50 feet and most material from this mine has been collected from the dump.
[Ray De Mark 2012]


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Bernalillo Co., Tijeras Canyon District, North Frustration Mine

Fluorite 7.8cm wide© Martin Gruell



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Cibola Co., Zuni Mountains District

Fluorite 11cm wide© FL Murray
Fluorite 7cm wide© FL Murray


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co.

Fluorite 13cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 20.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 13.2cm wide© fabreminerals.com
Fluorite 7.2cm wide© A&M

Fluorite 6.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Bound Ranch District, Doublestrike Claim (Rocky Trail)

Fluorite 4.5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite 2.3cm wide© 2001 John H. Betts

Fluorite 3.3cm wide© Jasun McAvoy

An early purple or dark green coarsely crystalline and a later well crystallized light green to white fluorite are found at the mine. The cubes are modified by dodecahedral faces as well as tetrahexahedron and hexoctahedrons. Three fault zone and breccia zones (1-4 feet in width) are found in a preCambrian granite.


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Bound Ranch District

There are a number of areas in the county that have produced fluorite. There are a number of deposits on the northern county border that extend into Catron county. Although fluorite was mined at the Burro Chief mine in the 1880's, most mining began during WWII. The fluorite tends to form in fault zones within the preCambrian granites in the area. Recently, the small subeconomic deposits of fluorite have been mined for their specimen potential.


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Burro Mountains District, West Burro Mts, Pine Canyon Deposit

fluorite 3.8cm tall© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Fluorite 5cm tall© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite on Quartz 7cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite 8.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 2.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 2.6cm wide© Tony Peterson
.
Fluorite 9.7cm wide© fabreminerals.com

The fluorspar occurred as numerous veins and stringers associated with quartz in granite. The purple to green octahedral faces are often covered with a mosaic of slightly misoriented faces.


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Burro Mountains District, West Burro Mts, Pine Canyon deposit, Judith Lynn Claim

Fluorite 5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite 5.5cm wide© Antonio Borrelli

Fluorite 4cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite 5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts

Fluorite 4.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 7.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 6cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 7.1cm wide© PMB


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Burro Mountains District, West Burro Mts, Spar Hill Prospect

Fluorite 9.1cm wide© www.mineralienkluft.at



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Gila Fluorspar District, Last Chance Mine

Fluorite 15cm wide© martin gruell
Fluorite 13.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Fluorite 5.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Gila Fluorspar District, Watson Mountain Prospect

Fluorite 6cm wide© Joseph Polityka



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Grant Co., Turkey Creek

Fluorite ~8cm wide© 2008 Peter Cristofono



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Luna Co., Cooks Peak District (Cooke's Peak District)

Fluorite ~6cm tall© 2008 Peter Cristofono
Fluorite 7.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 5.5cm tall© Christian Bracke
Fluorite 5cm tall© Peter Hargis

Fluorite 12cm wide© Andreas Brand



Fluorite
USA
Hansonburg District, Socorro Co., New Mexico, USA

Fluorite 5cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite, Quartz & Barite 16cm wide© Betts


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Socorro Co., Hansonburg District, Bingham

Fluorite & Galena 10.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Quartz 9.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite & Galena 11.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 11.5cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite 18.6cm center© Peter Hargis


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Socorro Co., Hansonburg District, Bingham, Blanchard Mine (Portalas-Blanchard Mine)

Fluorite on Quartz 13.5cm wide© Ward
Fluorite on Quartz 5cm wide© Russell G. Rizzo

Fluorite 6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 3.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 6.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Fluorite & Barite 27cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 10.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 7.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 10cm wide© Martins da Pedra

Fluorite 23cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite & Galena 6.3cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite on Quartz 9.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 8.4cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite on Quartz 7.2cm wide© Peter Hargis
Fluorite 12cm tall©

Fluorite & Galena ~9cm wide©
Fluorite on Quartz 4.5cm wide©

Fluorite 26cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

The Blanchard mine is best known for it's blue crystals. They can reach cubes up to 10cm in size. There are also pale green crystals shading into clear and also a more violet tint. In addition to the cubes, the crystals will also have well developed trisoctahedral modifications on the cube faces (these crystals tend to be less than 1cm in size. There are an assortment of secondary copper and lead minerals. The area was first prospected in 1872 for the lead/silver ores. When the claims lapsed, they were restaked with the intent to look for mineral specimens.


Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Socorro Co., Hansonburg District, Bingham, Garden Spring Canyon, Royal Flush Mine

Fluorite 7cm wide© Henry Minot 2009



Fluorite
USA
New Mexico, Socorro Co., Hansonburg District, Bingham, Mex-Tex Mine

Fluorite 13cm tall©
Fluorite on Quartz 3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts

Fluorite on Quartz 4cm wide© Charles Creekmur
Fluorite 4.7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite & Quartz 5.7cm wide© fabreminerals.com
Fluorite on Quartz 6.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Fluorite
USA
New York, Monroe Co., Penfield, Dolomite Products Quarry (Penfield Quarry)

Fluorite & Dolomite ~6cm wide©
Fluorite 5.1cm wide© Weinrich Minerals, Inc.

Fluorite 3.4cm wide© Weinrich
A two cm Fluorite on Dolomite© Cindy Hasler


Fluorite
USA
New York, Wayne Co., Walworth, Walworth Quarry (Dolomite Products Co. Inc. Quarry)

Fluorite 3cm wide© 2002 John H. Betts
Fluorite 2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite & Calcite 4cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 8cm wide© Bill Dameron

Cubes of clear to a pale blue tint up to 5cm on a dolomite matrix. Associated minerals include calcite, celestite, selenite, and sphalerite. The quarry has been open to field trips by area mineral clubs (cut-off saws are a handy collecting tool).


Fluorite
USA
Ohio, Allen Co., Richland Township, Bluffton, Bluffton Stone Co. Quarry

Fluorite 6cm tall© Dean Lagerwall
Fluorite 6.5cm tall© Dean Lagerwall

Fluorite & Sphalerite 5cm tall© Dean Lagerwall
Fluorite 2.8cm wide© A&M


Fluorite
USA
Ohio, Ottawa Co., Clay Center

Fluorite on Celestine 10cm wide© Rosellminerals.com
Fluorite & Celestine 14.8cm© Kevin Ward

Fluorite & Celestine 14.2cm© H. Obodda
Fluorite & Celestine ~7cm wide©

Fluorite ~9cm wide©
Fluorite 4.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 3.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky



Fluorite
USA
Ohio, Ottawa Co., Clay Center, Edward Kraemer & Sons Inc. Quarry (White Rock Quarry)

Fluorite, Celestite on Quartz 4.7cm wide© Fabre
Fluorite 2cm wide© Fabre

Cubes and masses of brown and colorless fluorite in the Lockport dolomite. Associated minerals include celestite, pyrite, calcite, dolomite, galena, gypsum and pyrite.


Fluorite
USA
Ohio, Paulding Co., Junction, Stoneco Auglaize quarry (Maumee Stone Co. quarry)

A 7.5mm Fluorite on matrix© C. Stefano
1.8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite6.3cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals
Fluorite 3cm wide© Weinrich

Fluorite & Calcite 4.4cm tall© fabreminerals.com
Fluorite & Calcite 3cm tall©

Fluorite & Calcite 2.5cm wide©

The fluorite is iridescent brown, purple and colorless. It is known for the phantoms of purple fluorite in clear cubes. Associated minerals include calcite, pyrite, quartz, sphalerite and asphalt.


Fluorite
USA
New York, St. Lawrence Co., Macomb Township, Macomb

In the 1880s a big find of fluorite at this locality was made with specimens weighing more than 100 pounds.


Fluorite
USA
Ohio, Wood Co., Custar, Pugh Quarry (France Stone Co. Custar quarry)

Fluorite 6cm wide©


Colorless and brown cubes of fluorite associated with calcite, Also present in the quarry is pyrite, barite, celestite, sphalerite and dolomite.


Fluorite
USA
Pennsylvania, Chester Co., Schuylkill Township, Phoenixville Mining District, Wheatley Mines

Fluorite 11cm wide© M.Heintzelman
Fluorite 8cm wide© Joseph Polityka

Fluorite 1.5cm tall© 2009, JGW


Fluorite
USA
Pennsylvania, Cumberland Co., Shippensburg, Valley Quarry

A 5mm Fluorite crystal on Calcite© M.Heintzelman



Fluorite
USA
Pennsylvania, Lancaster Co., Earl Township, Martindale, Burkholder Quarry

Fluorite 6.5cm wide© M.Heintzelman



Fluorite
USA
Tennessee, Monroe Co., Tellico Plains, Erwin and Cardin Prospect

Fluorite on Calcite 5.4cm wide© fabreminerals.com



Fluorite
USA
Tennessee, Smith Co., Central Tennessee Ba-F-Pb-Zn District, Carthage, Elmwood mine

Fluorite on Calcite 4.9cm wide© Fabre
Fluorite 3.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Sphalerite 11.3cm wide© Weinrich

Fluorite 5.6cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Sphalerite 9cm wide© 2008, Jesse Fisher

Fluorite 5.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite & Barite 14cm wide© Kevin Ward

Fluorite 10.5cm wide© H. Obodda
Fluorite 7.5cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez

Fluorite, Sphalerite on Baryte 9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Sphalerite 7cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Fluorite on Sphalerite 4.4cm wide© Antonio Borrelli

Fluorite on Baryte 5.3cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Baryte 11.5cm tall© Russell G. Rizzo

Fluorite on Sphalerite 11cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite & Sphalerite 17cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez

Fluorite on Sphalerite 13cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez
Fluorite 12cm tall© Alfonso Rodriguez

Fluorite on Sphalerite 11cm wide© Crystal Classics
Fluorite, Dolomite etc. 8cm wide© Alfonso Rodriguez

Fluorite 11.5cm wide© Collectors Edge
Fluorite 8.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 12.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 9.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite & Sphalerite 13cm tall© Joseph Polityka
Fluorite & Baryte 20cm wide© Joseph A. Freilich, LLC

Fluorite & Sphalerite 9.5cm wide© Kevin Ward
Fluorite on Sphalerite 7.9cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 7.8cm wide© www.exceptionalminerals.com
Fluorite, Barite, Sphalerite 14cm wide© Kevin Ward

Fluorite on Sphalerite 8.5cm wide© Kevin Ward
Fluorite 7.8cm tall© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite on Sphalerite 10.8cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 14cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals

Fluorite 7.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite on Galena ~5cm wide©

Fluorite & Dolomite 9.8cm wide© The Collector's Edge
Fluorite on Sphalerite 14cm wide© Weinrich

Fluorite on Sphalerite 10.1cm tall© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 20.2cm wide© J.Scovil
.
Fluorite on Sphalerite 12cm wide© Burtzlaff

Fluorite, Sphalerite & Baryte 18.5cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

In the 1980's and 1990's the Elmwood mine produced thousands of specimens of fluorite (mine produced zinc ores beginning in the 1970's). In addition to the fluorites, the mine also produced world class calcite twins. The other minerals found were sphalerite (black and ruby spar), barite (hemispheres), galena and anglesite. Isolated fluorite cubes on matrix up to 25cm in size were found. The general colors are white, blue, raspberry lavender and a pale yellow. The mine closed in 2002, since then mining has restarted, but was put back on a care and maintenance status.
Fluorite that has been redissolved is much more common in the Elmwood mine. The corners are often the only part of the fluorite crystal that remains.When there are chalcopyrite crystals growing on the surface of the fluorite cubes, there are often dark blue patches of coloring surrounding the sulfide crystals


Fluorite
USA
Tennessee, Smith Co., Central Tennessee Ba-F-Pb-Zn District, Carthage, Gordonsville Mine

Fluorite 7.8cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 12.5cm wide© Edelmin

Fluorite 9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 10.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 8cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite, Sphalerite, Baryte 6.2cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite & Sphalerite 10.6cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite on Sphalerite 11.1cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
.
Fluorite 10cm wide© Dan & Diana Weinrich Minerals


Similar specimens to those found in the Elmwood mine (started in the 1980's). Specimens are less commonly available than Elmwood material.


Fluorite
USA
Texas, Llano Co., Kingsland Granite Company quarry (Petrick quarry), Petrick pegmatite

Fluorite 6cm wide© F.Roberts



Fluorite
USA
Texas, Llano Co., Llano, Badu Hill pegmatite

Fluorite fragments ~2cm wide © 2005, F. Roberts


Chlorophane is a variety of fluorite that glows when it is heated for the first time. This variety is commonly found in pegmatites.


Fluorite
USA
Utah, Juab Co., Thomas Range

Fluorite 6cm tall© willy
Fluorite 6cm wide©


Fluorite
USA
Utah, Piute Co., Deer Trail Mountain

Fluorite ~7.5cm wide© R. Barney



Fluorite
USA
Utah, Piute Co., Marysvale District (Marysvale Uranium area)

Fluorite ~7cm tall© Christian Bracke



Fluorite
USA
Utah, Piute Co., Tushar Mts, Cottonwood Creek, Mount Baldy District, Deer Trail Mine

Fluorite 8cm wide© DM 06
Fluorite 7.3cm wide© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite 8cm tall© fabreminerals.com
Fluorite 7cm tall© fabreminerals.com

Fluorite 8.5cm wide© fabreminerals.com
Fluorite 13cm wide©

Fluorite on Quartz 2.5cm wide© Weinrich
Fluorite 6.4cm wide© Rob Lavinsky

Fluorite 4.9cm wide© Rob Lavinsky
Fluorite 11.3cm wide© Rob Lavinsky


Fluorite
USA
Wisconsin, Monroe Co., Edward Kraemer & Sons Quarry (Edward Kraemer and Sons; Inc.)

Fluorite & Celestine 6cm wide© Weinrich



Fluorite
USA
Wyoming, Park Co., Dead Indian Hill

Fluorite & Calcite 8cm wide© Chris Tucker


First Edition: David Von Bargen 2011
Second Edition: Rock Currier June 2012





Click here to view Best Minerals Fluorite, Alaska to Kentucky and here to view Best Minerals Fluorite and here for Best Minerals, Fluorite Best Minerals F and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

First Edition: David Von Bargen 2011
Second Edition: Rock Currier June 2012

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 27 time(s). Last edit at 07/07/2012 11:51AM by Rock Currier.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Alaska to Missouri
June 08, 2012 03:52PM
Minerva mine #1 Cave in Rock,Illinois, 18cm
Attachments:
open | download - IMG_0638_3.JPG (901.9 KB)
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Alaska to Missouri
June 08, 2012 05:42PM
Great job, as always, Rock. My one quick comment is that the title is Alaska to Missouri and the localities are Ns and Os...

Also thought I read somewhere that a lot of Catron County fluorites were actually mislabeled as being from there to disguise the true location, which I think might actually have been Judith Lynn. Not my expertise, though!

Will read over in more depth when I get the chance.

Cheers,
D.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Alaska to Missouri
June 08, 2012 09:10PM
Interesting, but before we would consider using it in the articled, it would have to be uploaded to Mindat's general gallery and not sent as an attachment to a post on the massage board. Also I sometimes don't use a image if I think there is too much trick lighting used in the image or I don't know who is uploading the image. Some uploaders have a lot more credibility than others.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Alaska to Missouri
June 08, 2012 09:14PM
Don,
Thanks for the kind words and the other information as well. Ill have to look into that. Any suggestions who might know about the Catron County fluorites? I have a few ideas about that as well.

Right now the fluorite articles are a mess because they are still under construction, but hopefully in a few days we can finish and clean them up so they will look a lot better.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 09, 2012 05:51PM
Rock,

A few Boulder Hill mine fluorite specimens that probably should be in the Nevada compilation.

[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]
[www.mindat.org]

Echoing Don, great job!

Cheers!

Steve
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 10, 2012 05:08PM
Rock:

I think the first time I heard about the Catron County mislabeling was on a web page of "Bob's Rock Shop", but I've since tracked down where I saw it in print. In the MinRec special issue on New Mexico, the reference is North RM and DeMark R (1989). "Fluorite from the Pine Canyon Deposit, Grant County, New Mexico". Mineralogical Record 20 (1): 47-50.

Opening two paragraphs read:
"Since the early 1970's, tens of thousands of purple octahedral fluorite specimens have appeared on the market, with the location given only as "Catron County, New Mexico." Most of this material was mined and sold wholesale by the late Dick Jones of Casa Grande, Arizona (see Bideaux, 1983). The precise location of this fluorite occurrence has always remained a mystery to mineral collectors with New Mexico fluorite occurrences. Investigation of known Catron Country fluorite locations identified in Fluorspar Resources of New Mexico (Rothrock et al., 1946) did not resolve the mystery; the fluorite from the published locations was dissimilar to the specimens being marketed as from "Catron County." Northrop (1959) reported not other locations producing fluorite similar to the “Catron County” specimens.
"During March of 1983, Robert H. Dickie and one of the authors (RSD) were investigating a fluorite location in the Burro Mountains near Silver City, Grant County, New Mexico. Crystal specimens collected at the site were immediately recognized as being essentially identical to the mysterious “Catron County” specimens."

Now having reread the article (rather than relying on my faulty recollections) there clearly are other fluorite localities in Catron County; the distinguishing features of the Pine Canyon specimens are the octahedral crystals with the scalloped surface features (e.g. [www.mindat.org]). The first of the two listed above for Catron County (41357) doesn’t have the surface texture, but photo description suggests it’s not Grant County because it’s pink; according to the MinRec article (p. 48), “Fluorite found on the dumps of the Burro Mountain prospect is invariably some shade of pink, and practically all of it is covered with a 1 to 2-mm drusy coating of quartz crystals. The quartz coating has usually been removed by dealers using hydrofluoric acid to expose the undamaged fluorite crystals. ... The pink color of the fluorite on the dumps apparently results from exposure of the purple fluorite to sunlight; no pink fluorite has been found in situ.”

The Wilcox District specimen (58880) seems to show that texture, but with different colors; also in the article (p. 48), “Specimens with colorless fluorite surrounding purple cores and oscillatory zoning have also been found.” Not familiar with the Wilcox district, though; the better locality information might indicate the specimen is of a different vintage and source.

In any case, I’m just parroting back what I’ve read rather than jumping up and down over anything. The descriptions in the article suggest that two of the three Catron County fluorites above could actually be from Grant County (and that there was some historical mislabeling in that direction), but it’s hard to say for sure. Maybe this bit of trivia is just something to add to the location text above.

Personally, I have a “Catron County” fluorite with an old label that I’d relabeled a while back – it’s a dead ringer for the Pine Canyon material!

Cheers,
D.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 10, 2012 08:41PM
Don,
Yes, I think you are right about the "Catron Colunty Fluorites being from Burro Mt. workings. I knew Dick Jones and his hydrofluoric acid cleaning operation and put them in the sun till they turned pink operation. Ill make a few other inquiries and then probably to into the database and clean up the images of the Catron Co. Fluorites. It is only through this process of picking away at errors in our database that we hopefully will be regarded as a reliable resource by knowledgeable people. There must be several hundred examples where dealers have given general or cloudy information about the localities their specimens are from to preserve their economic interest in their source. I was involved a while back in cleaning up the pink garnet locality that had generally come to be know as Lake Jaco, Chihuahua, but which was in reality in the adjacent state off Mexico.

When a new kink of specimen comes onto the market I always take the given locality with a grain of salt, knowing that with time, that more accurate particulars regarding the locality will become known. But it is now time we clean up this fluorite mess.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 10, 2012 10:22PM
Rock,

I realize this article is under construction; however, I'm a little confused. Do you intend to include all the photos that have been submitted? Or, will there be a winnowing process? Is your goal only to include the best specimens? Or, are you attempting to be be inclusive (soliciting photos and information from some lesser known sites)? [Within reason, of course]. Since I may be the world's worst photographer, I would have arrange to have one of my friends to undertake this task on my behalf. I would hate to have them do the work for naught.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 11, 2012 12:29AM
Don,
The standards we use for selecting images for the Best Minerals articles are flexible and if we use an image usually depends on what is available in the Mindat Database. The first requirement is that the mineral images first of all have to be present in the Mindat Database. In uploading images, the uploader resolves for us the Copyright problems and once that has been done, we are free to use them on Mindat in the Best Minerals articles and for other purposes. If the species we are describing in a Best Minerals article is rare, we may have only a few images of that mineral, and in that case we will take just about anything we can get. When the mineral is a common one, one of the "big" minerals like Quartz, Calcite, Fluorite, Baryte or Gypsum, we must of necessity be much more selective. If we were not we would be obligated to show sand grains from every know beach and river. On top of that there exists a policy here in the Best Minerals section of Mindat that the authors are allowed to use what ever images they want when created the article. That does not mean that those will remain the only pictures ever used in the article and we realize that every few years, more images and localities will need to be added to the articles, and existing images will need to be corrected, switched out for better ones or struck out all together. A project such as this will never be finished, if for no other reason because of new localities that produce specimens.

My personal standards for "big minerals" like fluorite is to include images of fluorite from all the localities that have produced decent crystals of fluorite. I will also include images of rather ratty looking specimens from heavily collected localities that don't produce very good fluorite specimens. An example of this would be the fluorite images from Franklin, New Jersey, or Tiger, Arizona, or the Thomas Range in Utah. I also want to include a broad range of images of fluorite from the various prolific fluorite localities, like Cave in Rock so that people can see for themselves the range of different types of specimens that the localities have produced. If a locality has produced a great many specimens I feel it is appropriate that my articles reflect that by showing many images of specimens from that locality. Its a rather flexible sort of yardstick and often I and the other authors are glad to have other images brought to our attention for inclusion in the articles and though we don't use all the images suggested to us, we use the majority of them, especially if the person suggesting them to us will also come up with good descriptive text about the images and the locality involved.

I might also add that in some cases we do not have in our database any images at all from a locality that we think should be included, and in that case we will include a description of the specimens produced and hope that eventually we will have some images from that locality uploaded that we can use to accompany the text.

I hope the above will be of some use to you in determining just how much effort you may want to make to help in our project.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 11, 2012 11:30AM
Rock,

This is pretty much what I expected. I have at least 2 specimens lined up (cited in my other reply). I can produce more Stoddard Mine specimens in the 5 mm range (glass clear and/or compound xls, one on a 10 cm plate) if you want them. The Stoddard has been overshadowed by the Wise Mine but deserves recognition, in my opinion.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 11, 2012 04:17PM
Rock,

My perpetual brain cramp just relaxed for a brief spell. Mindat already has a photo of my Stoddard, NH pale green fluorite plate (courtesy of Peter Cristofono, 2007).
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 11, 2012 07:50PM
Don,
it is not a very good specimen, but perhaps worthy of inclusion as perhaps better ones were found. Can you provide us with some background on the mine, its geology, history and specimen production?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 11, 2012 08:51PM
Well, it isn't an outstanding specimen (although the photograph isn't as well); however, it is better than the present specimens for Thomaston Dam. That's why I asked about micro specimens. The basic information is listed on the Mindat locality site. I have not seen a better large specimen but I do have a 3-4 cm floater (again pale green). I have only seen one specimen that is dark green & it isn't a complete crystal.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 13, 2012 06:02PM
Rock,

Here is what I have learned about the Westmoreland, New Hampshire Stoddard Mine. It was operated commercially by the American Wire and Steel Company, a subsidiary of the U. S. Steel Company, from 1911 to 1923. The fluorite apparently was sent to the Waukegan Works wire mill located along the shore of Lake Michigan. This mill produced barbed wire and was built in 1891. The Stoddard still has plenty of fluorite although it also has an abundance of quartz. I have been unable to discover why production stopped in 1923; it's too early for the Great Depression. Perhaps U. S. Steel decided to shift its supply source to the Illinois/Kentucky area because the transportation costs would have been lower and , I imagine, the new source was richer in fluorite. I hope this is helpful; it might be important to remind collectors that many sources of fine minerals started as commercial operations. In Westmoreland's case the Wise Mine was not as important commercially but much more important from a collector's standpoint because of its superior color.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 14, 2012 04:48AM
Don, Thats good, Ill use it, or at least parts of it.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/14/2012 06:28AM by Rock Currier.
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 15, 2012 11:02AM
us    
Stoddard No. 1 mine

Quote
Ladoo, Raymond B.. Fluorspar: Its Mining, Milling, and Utilization with a Chapter on Cryolite. Washington D.C.. UNT Digital Library. [url]http://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc12426/[/url]. Accessed June 15, 2012.
It was stated that practically all known ore had been mined out, and all the machinery has been removed.

American Steel and Wire had a plant in Worchester Mass.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 15, 2012 02:01PM
First, a plant is not necessarily a steel mill. Second, I could find no specific reference to a Worcester steel mill in the material online concerning American Steel and Wire. Third, throughout the 1980's, 1990's and 2000's I have personally seen lots of fluorite at the site. Granted, it's mostly lousy collecting material and heavily mixed with quartz. But this was the mystery to me. Why stop mining in 1923 when there was still plenty of fluorite available? American Steel and Wire acquired the Waukegan steel mill in a takeover operation in 1899. Then they were in turn gobbled up by J.P. Morgan et. al. in the formation of U.S. Steel in1901. I spoke to Gail Morgan a descendant of the founder of Morgan Construction Company in Worcester. She has no recollection of a mill in Worcester although she did say she wasn't the family historian. She did say her company provided parts for American Steel and Wire, which operated until the late 1970's. She promised to contact a member of the Worcester Historical Society on my behalf. So far, I haven't heard from her. (The Morgan Construction Company has offices in Pittsburgh, Singapore, São Paulo, Brazil, and Sheffield, England. It is not a small time operation and it provided technical assistance to Henry Ford when he formed Rouge Steel in the 1920's. Ford built a 350 acre steel mill facility for his automobile operations!)
avatar Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 15, 2012 03:33PM
us    
[www.worcesterhistory.org]
1977- American Steel & Wire closes its doors
Ichabod Washburn's wire company became part of American Steel & Wire in 1899, and part of U.S. Steel in 1901. As a division of a larger company, it continued as a cornerstone of Worcester industry. Its massive South Works plant in Quinsigamond Village was a fully-integrated steel mill and wire product facility where, in 1956, three thousand workers made wire, electrical cable, springs, and razor blade steel. The open hearth furnace of the South Works closed in 1958, signalling an end to steel making in New England. Over the next two decades divisions of the South Works relocated or closed. The plant was completely shut down in 1977. The failure of the American steel industry to modernize and compete in the new global economy meant a significant loss of manufacturing jobs for Worcester.

The Ladoo paper indicates that most of the veins in the area became pure quartz veins at depth. There wasn't a mill in the area, so all the ore had to be hand cobbed and sorted. They appear to have run out of good ore that could be processed by that method.
Re: Fluorite, United States, Missouri to Wyoming
June 15, 2012 04:52PM
I am well aware of the abundance of quartz at the mine; handcobbing would certainly be inefficient and helps answer the question as to why they would shut down. I failed to unearth (pun intended) information about Quinsigamund Village being a steel mill. The fact remains American Wire and Steel also had a plant along Lake Michigan. That plant would be much closer to the Illinois/Kentucky fluorite mines. Perhaps U.S. Steel decided to get all its fluorite from that area for both steel mills.
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