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Howe Quarry (Howe #1 Quarry; Huspband Quarry), South Glastonbury, Glastonbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut, USA
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Latitude: 41°38'22"N
Longitude: 72°36'1"W
 
 
George Andrews opened the Howe No. 1 quarry in a granite pegmatite about 1870. Several years later the northern half of the pegmatite was sold to Joshua and William P. Huspband and the southern half was leased for 20 years to Charles Hall. In 1905 Louis W. Howe of South Glastonbury acquired both parts of the property and produced 65,000-70,000 tons of feldspar between 1905 and 1928, when it became inactive. The opencut trending N. 5° E ended up being about 100 feet wide, almost 800 feet long, and 100 feet deep at the south end. For a time it was the largest pegmatite quarry in Connecticut. The feldspar was sold for use in porcelain and for Bon Ami scouring compound. In the early 1990s Vespa Stone Products attempted to use some of the dump material for crushed stone, but too much mica made this unacceptable for construction.

The typical granite pegmatite consists of at least three units: a thin wall zone of plagioclase-microcline perthite-quartz pegmatite that contains about 0.08 percent of beryl in crystals as much as a fifth of an inch in cross section, a core of microcline perthite-plagioclase-quartz pegmatite containing less than 1 percent of muscovite, The core of microcline perthite-plagioclase-quartz rock appears to have formed most of the pegmatite and to have been coarsely crystallized and therefore amenable to hand cobbing. The white microcline is intergrown with small amounts of albite. It seldom occurs in pure masses more than 3 feet across, the bulk of the material shipped being an irregular or graphic intergrowth of quartz and feldspar.

The largest mica “books” were not more than 5 inches across and showed wedge structure, crumpling, or ruling. None of the mica is of commercial quality.

Biotite is present only here and there. It occurs in small crystals in the finer-grained portions of the pegmatite.

In a few places there is a small quantity of red, well crystallized garnets up to an inch in diameter.

Black tourmaline is present, but none of the crystals observed were more than one-half inch in diameter. Occasionally it is present in granular masses of minute crystals that form veins, one-sixteenth to one-fourth of an inch wide, traversing the pegmatite.

Small fracture filling units about a foot in maximum thickness contained as much as 1 percent of beryl. Although the beryl content was extremely small, crystals more than 6 inches in diameter have been described.

Rare minerals are generally lacking from this pegmatite, but some molybdenite, columbite, uraninite and secondary uranium minerals have been found.


Mineral List

Albite
'Allanite' ?
Almandine
Annite
Autunite
Beryl
Columbite-(Fe)
Fluorapatite
var: Mn-bearing Fluorapatite
Meta-autunite
Metatorbernite
Microcline
Microlite Group ?
Molybdenite
'Monazite' ?
Muscovite
Opal
var: Opal-AN

Pyrolusite
Quartz
var: Smoky Quartz
Samarskite-(Y)
Schorl
Torbernite
Uraninite
Uranophane
'Xenotime' ?


26 entries listed. 19 valid minerals. 1 erroneous literature entry.

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References

Sanford, Samuel and R. W. Stone. (1914): Useful Minerals of the United States. United States Geological Survey Bulletin 585.

Watts, A. S. (1916): The Feldspars of the New England and North Appalachian States. U. S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 92.

Montague, S. A. (1937): Some Mineral Localities Near Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals: 12(5): 145.

Zodac, Peter (1941): The Andrews Quarry Near Portland, Conn. Rocks and Minerals: 16(5): 164-167.

Jones, Robert W. (1960): Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.

Foye, W. G. (1922): Mineral Localities in the Vicinity of Middletown, Connecticut. American Mineralogist: 7: 4-12.

Cameron, Eugene N., David M. Larrabee, Andrew H. McNair, James T. Page, Glenn W. Stewart, and Vincent E. Shainin. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.

Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.

Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958): Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1042-Q.

Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.

Ryerson, Kathleen. (1972): Rock Hound's Guide to Connecticut. Pequot Press.

Bastin, Edson S. (1910): Economic Geology Of The Feldspar Deposits Of The United States. U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 420.

Stearns, H. T. (1983): Memoirs of a Geologist: From Poverty Peak to Piggery Gulch. Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu.

Sterrett, Douglas B. (1923): Mica Deposits Of The United States. U. S. Geological Survey Bulletin 740.

Schairer, J. F. (1931): The Minerals of Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey, Hartford, Conn. Bulletin 51.

Betts, John. (1996): The Quarries and Minerals of South Glastonbury, Connecticut. George F. Kunz Competition Papers 1996. New York Mineralogical Club.

Betts, John. (1999): The Quarries and Minerals of the Dayton Road District, South Glastonbury, Connecticut. Rocks & Minerals: 74(2): 110-121.


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