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Agrigento (Girgenti), Agrigento Province (Girgenti Province), Sicily, Italy

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Name(s) in local language(s): Agrigento, Sicilia, Italia
 

It was the site of the ancient Greek city of Akragas, named Agrigentum under Roman rule; known as Kirkent or Jirjent under Arab rule, it was thus Sicilianised as Girgenti and retained this name until 1927, when the city was renamed Agrigento.

Various sulphur mines operated in the municipal territory of Agrigento (Girgenti): in the northern outskirts of Agrigento the mines Ferlicchio (Serraferlicchio), Pisciotto, Nunziata, San Pietro, Piattaforma, Manganeria, and Calcarelle; to the north-west of the city, near the border with Raffadali municipality, Cattà mine (opened in 1870) at Contrada Cattà and Milione mine (opened in 1871) at the northern foot of Monte Milione, the latter of which, according to Jervis (1881), yielded very limpid prismatic crystals of celestine; to the south-east of the city and south of Favara, Calenazzo mine and some other mines lying partly in the municipal territory of Favara, the most known of which is Ciavolotta mine [see http://www.mindat.org/loc-55882.html].


The locality name "Agrigento" or "Girgenti", written on the labels of many old sulphur, celestine, gypsum, and aragonite specimens, usually is not referred to the municipal territory of Agrigento (Girgenti), but to a larger territory in many cases indentifiable with the province of Agrigento (Girgenti). This territory can be interpreted in different ways: an enlarged territory around Girgenti, which included the Girgenti-Favara-Naro mining area; the former Girgenti district (which included the sulphur-producing municipalities of Girgenti, Favara, Racalmuto, Cattolica Eraclea, Comitini, Aragona, Porto Empedocle, Raffadali, Siculiana, Montallegro, Naro, Palma di Montechiaro, and Campobello di Licata) of the former Girgenti province; the province of Agrigento (or Girgenti); the Agrigento (Girgenti) mining basin, that, besides the province of Agrigento (Girgenti), also included various sulphur localities in Caltanisseta province, from where sulphur was sent to the port of Porto Empedocle. Therefore, except in rare cases, the attribution of the specimens with such lables to a more precise locality is practically impossible.
Also the locality name "Girgenti" recorded for celestine (in association with sulphur, aragonite, and gypsum) in Palache et al. (1951) is not univocally interpretable.

Note: Until 1878, when the municipality of Lampedusa and Linosa was created, Linosa Island [see http://www.mindat.org/loc-214150.html] was included in Girgenti municipality.

Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities


9 entries listed. 6 valid minerals.

Localities in this Region

Italy

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References


- Jervis G. (1881): I tesori sotterranei dell'Italia. Vol. 3: Regioni delle Isole. Sardegna e Sicilia. Addenda ai precedenti volumi. Loescher, Torino, XXII+539 pp.
- Palache C., Berman H., Frondel C. (1951): The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana Yale University 1837-1892, Seventh edition, Volume II. John Wiley & Sons, page 418.

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