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Jinjiazhuang Mine, Xiaozhangjiakou gold field, Chicheng Co., Zhangjiakou Prefecture, Hebei Province, China

Latitude: 40°52'37"N
Longitude: 115°34'36"E
金家庄金矿, 小张家口金矿田, 赤城县, 张家口市, 河北省, 中国

Granitoid-related vein-type gold deposit, hosted in amphibole pyroxenite, diopside gabbro, and peridotite in altered faults along the contact zone between a mafic-ultramafic intrusion and migmatitic gneiss and quartz monzonite. The orebodies occur as veins and lenses. They are up to 200 m long and up to 4.5 m wide. Alterations include silica, chlorite, sericite, and carbonate alterations. The main ore mineral form veins, veinlets, disseminations, breccia, and lumps. The textures are hypidiomorphic-xenomorphic granular, frequently included, solid solution, and metasomatic. The deposit is interpreted as a mesothermal deposit related to mafic-ultramafic intrusions.

Mineral List

Albite
Arsenopyrite
Calcite
Chalcopyrite
'Chlorite Group'
Diopside
Dolomite
Epidote
Galena
'Garnet'
Gold
var: Electrum
Hematite
Kaolinite
'K Feldspar'
Limonite
Magnetite
Marcasite
Millerite
Muscovite
var: Sericite

'Olivine'
Pyrargyrite
Pyrite
Pyrolusite
Quartz
'Serpentine Group'
Sphalerite
Spinel
Stephanite
Talc
Tetrahedrite


31 entries listed. 23 valid minerals.

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References

Jing Li (1988): Geological characteristics of the Jinjiazhuang Au deposit, Zhangjiakou, Hebei Province. Geology and Prospecting 24(6), 24-26 (in Chinese with English abstract).

Kuiren Liu (1989): Electrical prospecting for gold in Jinjiazhuang district. Geology and Prospecting 25(1), 40-43 (in Chinese with English abstract).

Debao Mao (1992): Gold deposits association with alkaline igneous rocks. Geology and Prospecting 28(9), 13-17.

Liangming Liu (1993): Studies on tectono-geochemistry of the metallogenic rifts and the prognosis of concealed deposits in the Jinjiazhuang ore field. Geology and Prospecting 29(7), 42-46.

Peixue Ma and Anguo Chen (1994): Characteristics of fluid inclusions and conditions of metallogenic physical chemistry in Jinjiazhuang gold deposit, Hebei. Geology and Prospecting 30(3), 34-38.

Hongyang Li, Zhusen Yang, Zhenju Ding, Taiyi Luo, and Zhenmin Gao (2000): Geochemistry of Wall-rock Alteration of the Jinjiazhuang Ultrabasic Rock-Type Gold Deposit. Geological Review 46(5), 536-542.

Hongyang Li, Zhusen Yang, Zhenju Ding, Taiyi Luo, and Zhenmin Gao (2000): Characteristics of geochemistry in the Jinjiazhuang ultrabasic rock-type gold deposit in Chicheng County, Hebei Province. Geology and Prospecting 36(4), 24-27.

Nie, F.-J., Jiang, S.-H., and Liu Y. (2004): Intrusion-Related Gold Deposits of North China Craton, People's Republic of China. Resource Geology 54(3), 299-324.

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