Mindat Logo

Silver King Mine (Silver King Mining Co. property; Fortune Mine; California Mine; White Horse Mine; Seventy-Four Mine; Last Chance Mine), Comstock Wash, Kings Crown Peak area, Pioneer District, Pinal Mts, Pinal Co., Arizona, USA
This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.

Stromeyerite
Silver King Mine, Comstock Wash, Kings Crown Peak area, Pioneer District, Pinal Mts, Pinal Co., Arizona, USA

Photo: 2008 Jesse Crawford
Latitude: 33°19'49"N
Longitude: 111°5'19"W
 
 
A former surface and underground Ag-Pb-Au-Cu-Zn mine located in sec. 24, T1S, R12E, in Comstock Wash, about 1 mile W of Kings Crown Peak, about 3 miles north of Superior. Discovered in the fall of 1874 and initially worked until Mar 24, 1875. Owned by Messrs. Long, Mason, Reagan & Copeland. During 1976-96 it was operated by the Silver King Mining Co. In 1916 the property was acquired by Silver King of Arizona Mining Co. Subsequently the property was acquired by Bat Gays who carried on small-scale operations. Previous operators include T. Gayo; Tritt Smelting and Refining; Silver King Syn.; Apache Silver; Silver King Arizona Mining; Dean Brothers; Silver King of Arizona Mining; and the Silver King Mining Co. During 1945-46 some of the area was prospected by diamond drilling. First produced 1877 and closed 1955. Owned by Dick Lobb and Grace Middleton (1982). Operated by Mr. John Reynolds (1987).

Also known as / designated: Patented claim MS 2052; Patented claim MS 2161; Patented claim MS 461; Patented claim MS 462.

The Silver King porphyry, in which was developed the Silver King orebody, crops out as an irregular mass approximately 2,500 feet long from east to west by 1,200 feet wide. It was intruded into the southeastern part of a much larger stock of quartz diorite.

Mineralization is hosted in Pinal Schist and in Silver King Quartz Diorite. Veinlets are interlaced in quartz diorite porphyry and Pinal Schist. The orebody formerly cropped out at the top of a little hill about 75 feet high, composedof uch altered yellowish-brown to greenish-gray porphyry. The orebody was apparently a compact plexus of veinlets inclosed in comparatively unfissured porphyry. Blake's description and the maps of underground workings show that the orebody was a stockwork about 130 feet in maximum diameter, with a general dip of 70ยบ west. The stockwork was disposed about an irregular core or axis of milk-white quartz, containing some bunches of rich ore but as a whole comparatively barren. The ore consisted of altered porphyry traversed in all directions by innumerable veinlets carrying stromeyerite, tetrahedrite, galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and pyrite in a gangue of quatz with some baryte. Blake observed that stromeyerite and highly argentiferous tetrahedrite with ore or less acanthitewere the most important constituents of the ore on the upper levels, whereas argentiferous sphalerite had become the principal ore mineral on the seventh level.

The pit at the former outcrop of the orebody shows the brecciated quartz and porphyry. Extending N60-70E from the breccia mass is a steeply northeastward-dipping fissure which was mineralized for a few hundred feet along its strike. Evidence for other structural control of the breccia mass is not readily apparent. Ore control descriptions Silver King Quartz Diorite Porphyry dikes and stocks.

A legend concerning this mine is the story of the mine manager wearing a crown of interconnected native silver wires around his hat.

Original development was by open pit (115 x 92 x 120 feet). Workings in 1881 included a main shaft more than 600 feet deep, 5 levels, crosscuts & winzes. A 10-stamp mill was erected on the property. The old shaft (Bilk shaft) was ultimately 987 feet deep. A new shaft was sunk to 635 feet after 1916. There were several smaller shafts and open cuts. There were also 7 levels of workings. Workings are located on the present El Medico claim. Production was 5,943,157 oz. Ag, valued at $6,526,094 (1875-1889), and 232,764 oz. Ag valued at $252,674 (1918-1928) (period values).

Mineral List

Acanthite
Anglesite
Antimony
Antlerite
Aurichalcite
Azurite
Baryte
Bornite
Calcite
Cerussite
Chalcocite
Chalcopyrite
Chlorargyrite
Copper
Covellite
Cuprite
Fluorite
Freibergite
Galena
Gold
Hematite
Malachite
Manganite
Massicot
Polybasite
Pyrite
Quartz
Quartz
var: Milky Quartz

Siderite
Silver
Sphalerite
Stromeyerite
Tetrahedrite
Vanadinite
Wulfenite


35 entries listed. 34 valid minerals.

The above list contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

The Resources of Arizona - A Manual of Reliable Information Concerning the Territory, compiled by Patrick Hamilton (1881), Prescott, AZ: 59.

The History of Arizona, 2nd. State legislature, Chap. X: 119.

Dana, E.S. (1892) System of Mineralogy, 6th. Edition, New York.: 47, 1094.

Guild, F.N. (1910), The Mineralogy of Arizona, The Chemical Publishing Co., Easton, PA.

Ransome, F.L. (1912) Copper Deposits near Superior, Arizona, USGS Bull. 540: 3-7, 20-22, 156-158.

University of Arizona Bull. 41 (1916-17), Mineralogy of Useful Minerals in Arizona: 22, 48, 54, 56, 58.

Guild, F.N. (1917), A microscopic study of the silver ores and their associated minerals, Economic Geology: 12: 297-353.

Jones, Jr., E.L. & F.L. Ransome (1920), Deposits of manganese ore in Arizona, USGS Bull. 710-D: 159.

Arizona Mining Journal (1922) July 1, 1922: 37.

Galbraith, F.W. (1935) Geology of the Silver King Area, Superior, Arizona. Ph.D. thesis, University of Arizona.

Elsing and Heineman (1939) USGS Bull. 140: 99.

Rocks & Minerals (1940): 15: 278.

Rocks & Minerals (1941): 16:77.

Short, M.N., et al (1943), Geology and ore deposits of the Superior mining area, Arizona, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 151: 7, 11-13, 139-154.

Palache, C., Berman, H. & Frondel, C. (1944), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume I: Elements, Sulfides, Sulfosalts, Oxides. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York. 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 834pp.: 98, 191, 353, 381.

Rocks & Minerals (1946): 21: 431.

Galbraith, F.W. (1947), Minerals of Arizona, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 153: 9, 15, 16, 18, 26, 27.

Romslo, T.M. & S.F. Ravitz (1947), Arizona manganese-silver ores, US Bureau of Mines Report of Investigation 4097.

Wilson, E.D., et al (1950), Arizona zinc and lead deposits, part I, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 156: 96-98.

Wilson, E.D., et al (1950), Arizona zinc and lead deposits, part II, Arizona Bureau of Mines Bull. 158.

Dunning, C.H. (1959) Rock to Riches: 116-118.

Galbraith, F.W. & D.J. Brennan (1959), Minerals of Arizona: 55.

Farnham, L.L., Stewart, L.A., and Delong, C.W. (1961), Manganese deposits of eastern Arizona, US Bureau of Mines Information Circular 7990: Fig. 18, 126.

Dunning, Charles H. (1966) Silver from Spanish Missions to Space Age Missiles: 113-121.


Sawyer, M.B., Gurmendi, A.C., Daley, M.R., and Howell, S.B. (1992) Principal Deposits of Strategic and Critical Minerals in Arizona, U.S. Bureau of Mines Special Publication, 334 pp.

Anthony, J.W., et al (1995), Mineralogy of Arizona, 3rd. ed.: 100, 167, 226, 229, 289, 333, 373, 377-378, 385, 393.

USGS Superior Quadrangle map.

Arizona Department of Mineral Resources Silver King Mine file.

Arizona Department of Mineral Resources Magma Copper Co. file.

Arizona Department of Mineral Resources U files.

U.S. Bureau of Land Management Mining District Sheet #608.

Hinton, R.J., 1000 Old Arizona Mines: 72-73.

MRDS database Dep. ID #10048314, MRDS ID M899881; and Dep. ID #10235032, MAS ID #0040210760.

Mineral and/or Locality  
Search Google  
Copyright © Jolyon Ralph and Ida Chau 1993-2014. Site Map. Locality, mineral & photograph data are the copyright of the individuals who submitted them. Site hosted & developed by Jolyon Ralph. Mindat.org is an online information resource dedicated to providing free mineralogical information to all. Mindat relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters. Mindat does not offer minerals for sale. If you would like to add information to improve the quality of our database, then click here to register.
Current server date and time: October 31, 2014 12:59:21 Page generated: April 21, 2014 16:52:06