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Amesite

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Amesite
May 14, 2009 08:00PM
©


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This article is a place holder and needs someone to take it in hand and finish the first draft. If you would like to take this article in hand, leave a reply message below or contact Rock Currier via private message by clicking on the PM button next to my name at the top of the article.



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Can you help make this a better article? What good localities have we missed? Can you supply pictures of better specimens than those we show here? Can you give us more and better information about the specimens from these localities? Can you supply better geological or historical information on these localities?

Below are some preliminary notes I have made about Amesite. This entry and thread has been made as a place holder for information that you will hopefully contribute about Amesite. It should be in no way be thought of as a claim I have staked out to write about this mineral, and in fact is an invitation for someone to step forward and create the article about this mineral. If you are so inclined and have questions about the format that such an article should have, go the The welcome topic at the top of the Best Minerals forum and read what has been posted there. Also take a look at some of the more mature articles that have already been written like Rhodochrosite, Adamite, Millerite etc. You will need also to pick out other images of Amesite that will go into the article.



Amesite
(Mg,Al)3(Si,Al)O5(OH)4 Triclinic (pseudo hexagonal)
Amesite xl. 1.8mm, Saranovskii Mine, Sarany Village Permskaya Oblast', Urals Region, Russia © D. Preite

Amesite Micro and rare species collections.
Mg2Al(SiAl)O5(OH)4
A member of the kaolinite-serpentinite group. “As tapering pseudohexagonal prisms elongated along [001], to 2 mm; also tabular. Twinning: Common as six-fold sector twins on {001} and polysynthetic twins parallel to {010} prism edges.”1
1 Handbook of Mineralogy, Volume II, Silica, Silicates, Part 1, Anthony, Bideaux, Bladh, Nichols, p20.

Amesite
Antarctica
Pensacola Mountains, Dufek Massif. “It comes from the lower portion of the Dufek Massif, a stratiform mafic intrusive…. The amesite occurs on the surface of a hand specimen of apparent contact-metamorphic origin as small crystals along with idocrase and chlorite. The amesite crystals are in the form of hexagonal prisms, are pale green in color, and in some cases have a thin reddish surface coating.”1 There are photomicrographs of amesite crystals 1 mm and smaller amesite in the American Mineralogist article.
1 American Mineralogist, Vol. 61, p. 497, 1976.

Amesite
Bolivia, Cochabamba department, Ayopaya province, Cerro Sapo. The locality is about 30km N of the little town of Independencia; called Palca in old references. These amesite crystals are from the pre Incan sodalite locality which is still being mined today. The current operator is an Italian who mines it exclusively for sodalite to be used as an ornamental stone. It is somewhat lighter than the sodalite from Brazil and combined with the fact that the cost of transportation from this remote locality to the outside world is very high he can’t compete very successfully with the Brazilian material on the world market. Sometimes in the waste rock that is thrown down the steep mountain side there are small vugs with strange thing in them and among those are wonderful little prismatic twinned crystals that look like stars when looking down the C axis. Alfredo Petrov had perhaps a dozen of these wonderful tiny things that he collected at the deposit. About the maximum size so far for amesite from the deposit ia about a mm.

Amesite
Canada
Quebec, Black Lake, Asbestos Mine. Here amesite is associated with grossular, calcite, diopside and clinozoisite.
How big did the crystals get here and how much of it was there.

Amesite
Russia
Urals, Saranovskoye Chrome Deposit. The crystal structure of amesite was determined on crystals from this deposit in the northern Urals.1 This locality is better known for the brilliant sparkling druses of uvarovite crystals. Here amesite crystals aggregates up to about a cm that look a little like mica. They are typically green to purple in color and often have a good color change.
1 Steinfink, H. and Brunton, G., 1956 The crystal structure of amesite. Acta Cryst., vol. 9, p.487.

Amesite
United States
Massachusetts, Hampden County, Chester, Emery Mine. “In hexagonal plates, foliated resembling the green talc from the Tyrol. …specimens occurring abundantly, and sometimes in large and small crystals at the emery mine of Chester, Mass. …In hexagonal plates, foliated, resembling the green talc from the Tyrol …apple-green…luster pearly on crystal face.”1 Here amesite is associated with diaspore, magnetite and rutile.
1 A System of Mineralogy, 6th edition, Edward Salisbury Dana 1982.



Click here to view Best Minerals A and here for Best Minerals A to Z and here for Fast Navigation of completed Best Minerals articles.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/27/2012 08:39PM by Rock Currier.
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