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Best Minerals - Baryte - Welcome

Posted by Rock Currier  
avatar Best Minerals - Baryte - Welcome
March 06, 2009 10:49AM
In this forum we hope to create articles with pictures about all the good Baryte specimens from all the good Baryte localities. You are welcomed and encouraged to help create content for this and all the Best Mineral forums. You are encouraged to use the approximate format that has already been developed and exampled in the more extensively developed examples in the Best A Minerals forum. If you would like to take a crack at creating content for a particular barite locality or barite localities in general, please read over the suggestions and example in the sticky message at the top of the A minerals forum and then add it to this thread entry and I will work with you and walk you through any problems you may encounter. Ill also create a thread entry for the mineral you want to work on and help get you started. You will not be able to create new threads in this forum, unless you are approved as a moderator of the Best Minerals forum. If you have something you think is worth adding to the thread about a particular mineral, just make a thread entry about it, and Ill add it into the thread for that particular entry or at leas ask you for more information about it. There is a huge amount of work to do, so lets get started.

Ideally what we want to know about each significant mineral from each locality is:

1. What is the largest crystal of the mineral that the locality has produced?
2. What do the best specimens from this locality look like and where can one be seen?
3. Does the locality produce a variety of different kinds of specimens of this species, and what do the best of each type look like and how many of them were found etc.
4. What are the associated minerals found with this species and what is its geological setting?
5. How abundant are these specimens and when were they found? A type locality? In other words, how rare are they.
6. How do they compare to other specimens of the same mineral from other localities?
7. How much is it worth. This should probably be optional, but in cases where specimens are worth thousands of dollars we should probably say something of the value of these things.
8. What kind of care and feeding do these specimens require? Are they delicate, radioactive, unstable, color changeable etc.?
9. Are the specimens commonly faked, and if so, how to tell if they are?
10. Are there any interesting stories relating to the collecting of these specimens or their discovery as a new mineral?

Of course this is in reality impractical, but if we keep these questions in mind, we will do a lot better job when writing about them.

Here are some interesting statistics about calcite and quartz here on Mindat (April, 2009)
Calcite: ~16,000 localities ~7400 images 56 countries represented
Quartz: ~28,800 localities ~5000 images 65 countries represented
Fluorite ~6300 localities ~6900 images 39 countries represented.
Barite ~7382 localities ~24pp images 38 countries represented

Most lists of countries of the world list a few more than 200 countries. That means that here on mindat we do not have any barite specimens pictured here for most of the countries in the world. I wonder how many countries in the world have no mineral localities what so ever listed here on mindat.

A few years ago I did some writing about Baryte specimens and I am placing that text here to help anyone who wants to write about Baryte from a particular country or as a place holder till I can get around to doing more work on it.


Barite
BaSO4
Barite is a common mineral that often occurs in good crystals. It is a soft mineral and has very good cleavage(s) and is easily chipped and scratched. It is hard to keep specimens of Barite undamaged over a long period of time. There are so many good localities for this mineral it is hard to know where to begin. Certainly there must be at more than a hundred localities that have produced fine specimens. Historically however most collectors and curators would agree that England has probably produced the best barite crystals and of many different kinds. During the last ten years, however, some wonderful golden barite crystals have been found at the Meikle mine in Nevada, USA that some feel are the finest barite crystals found to date. Fine specimens of these have sold for thousands of dollars.
Barite is the most common barium containing mineral. It is found in a wide variety of geological environments; hydrothermal metalliferous veins in limestones and other sedimentary rocks, in clay deposits, hematite deposits and in lake and marine deposits, in amygdaloidal cavities in basic igneous flows and in hot spring deposits. It is often mined for industrial use. Millions of tons of barite have been mined to make “drilling mud” which is used in oil well drilling. The density of barite in this mud helps contain the high pressures sometimes encountered in drilling these wells from blowing out the well.
There are thousands of localities for barite. The choice of localities included here has been somewhat arbitrary but include many of the more prominent localities that produce good specimens. Many localities have been excluded because of the small crystal size or nondescript nature of the barites found there. Let me know if you have a favorite barite locality that I have not mentioned here and we will see what we can do to include it. Many localities produce fine specimens of microscopic barite crystals but I do not list them here. In that direction is madness. A good article by Bill Henderson in the Mineralogical record talks about a few of them and has pictures of them. Look up this article if you are interested.1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p 61-64.

Australia
New South Wales, Prospect Hill, Prospect Quarry. This basalt quarry is better know for its fine prehnite specimens than its barite. But “Barite was the last of the minerals to crystallize in the vugs. It is very rare and specimens are found very occasionally. It has been observed as tabular white crystals in parallel groups to 1 cm across on drusy siderite (Australian Museum specimen D35330), rosettes of pale brown, transparent, tabular crystals to 4 mm across on white calcite Australian Museum specimen D38535) and similar rosettes on drusy marcasite (George Dale collection) from the sheared gabbroic dolerite exposed between the Widemere and Prospect quarries.”1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 25, 1994, p 188.

Queensland, Mount Isa. “Barite is one of the more spectacular minerals occurring at Mount Isa. The best specimens come from the copper orebodies. Beautiful, golden brown, flattened tabular to prismatic crystals to 4 cm occur associated with native copper (often altered to malachite) within a honeycomb siliceous sinter. The sinter was found in large masses on 4 level within the Black Rock open cut. The barite is clouded by native copper inclusions. Plates exceeding 30 cm were found but few have survived. Some large, golden brown, prismatic crystals to 10 cm with copper, chalcopyrite and pyrite inclusions were also found. Occasional yellow-brown, blocky prismatic to tabular crystals up to 10 cm in length, some doubly terminated, have emerged from various fault zones within the copper orebodies. Some attractive barite clusters have been found in sepiolite and palygorskite fault fill from within the silver-lead-zinc orebodies. A notable occurrence was on 16D sublevel where yellow clusters to 3 cm across were found enclosed within sepiolite. The clusters are composed of thick, bladed crystals up to 1 cm long, forming as elongated rosettes. The miners use high-pressure hoses to blast the sepiolite and palygorskite in such faults. The result is that literally rains barite crystals.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.478.

South Australia, Burra Burra Mine. “Sharp, lustrous crystals of barite up to 2 cm with azurite, malachite and libethenite on chrysocolla on quartzite matrix were found. The crystals, of a bladed to tabular habit, are transparent and range from colorless to pale yellow. Barite was also found as fawn-brown nodules to 7 cm across, the centers of which are buggy and lined with minute colorless barite crystals and occasional hemispheres of malachite.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 25, 1994, p.127.

South Australia, Flinders Ranges, Oraparinna. “Parallel group of golden blocky xls to 2 cm. gemmy tips. 2.5 cm. somewhat scarce.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of specimens in his collection.

Tasmania, Rosenbery Mine. “Nice specimens of transparent yellow barite came from the Rosenbery mine in the 1970’s. The crystals are up to 2 cm long on plates up to 20 cm across.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.385.

Victoria, Phillip Island, Red Cliff Head. “Snow-white aggregates of platy barite crystals up to 7 mm across form attractive combinations with orange chabazite at Red Cliff Head on Phillip Island. Similar crystals have also been observed with ferrierite, calcite or chalcedony at Red Bluff and several other localities.”1 These barites are found in amygdaloidal pockets in Tertiary age basalts. A good article about the zeolites and associated minerals from Red Cliff Head, Philip Island and Flinders is sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.457.

Brazil
Paraiba, João Pessoa. “…Dr. Reinhard Wegner of the Federal University in Campina Grande, Paraiba, has obtained some rather attractive small groups of barite crystals from a limestone quarry near João Pessoa…The crystals vary in color from colorless to pale yellow to gray, and from bladed, tabular aggregates up to about 8 cm, though most are in the 2 to 5-cm range. Some of the aggregates form quite good rosettes. Pyrite and calcite are sometimes present.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p.387.

Sao Paulo, Jacupirananga. “Barite is very rarely found as clear, yellow prismatic crystals up to 1 cm perched on dolomite crystals in vugs in high-M gO1 carbonatite from zone 2.” Jacupirananga is a carbonatite deposit mined for its apatite content and is better know for a whole range of interesting other, mostly micro minerals. See the interesting article sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 15, 1984, p.264.

Bulgaria
Madan Orefield. “Barite, the principal sulfate minerals in the veins is of limited distribution. The milky, grayish white to yellow-brown crystals are semi-opaque, and occur zonally associated with fine-grained quartz, pyrite, galena, calcite, kaolinite and other minerals.”1 The Madan Orefield is better known for its galena, sphalerite and other minerals. The mines in this district have been worked for base metals since the fifth or sixth centuries BC. See the interesting article sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p.441.

Canada
British Colombia, Grand Forks, Rock Candy Mine. The Candy mine is noted for its green fluorite and golden barite specimens. When they are associated with each other they specimens can be striking. The best specimens are the golden tabular, diamond shaped barite crystals up to about 10 cm growing on somewhat rough green fluorite octahedrons. On a good weekend a hard working collector could come away with one to two hundred specimens if he got lucky and if he were very lucky he might get two or three find specimens. Almost all the good specimens collected here were dug by dedicated field collectors with hand tools. The locality has produced specimens for many hears. Over the years collectors and commercial collectors have beaten this locality to death and some the property owners have effectively blasted the workings shut for fear that someone would be killed in the increasingly dangerous workings. Most of the better specimens came from a big mostly open stope in the upper workings that were open to the surface. The best specimens from here would sell for more than $1000 each, but lesser specimens can be found from time to time for less than $100. The Rock Candy mine is a fluorite mine that started operation in 1918 and the first production of a few hundred tons was taken out by pack animals. The mine was worked on three levels and the stopes eventually broke through to the surface. All told the mine produced perhaps 50,000 tons of fluorite. “The most important feature of the deposit with respect to the collector is the abundance and size of the cavities. Small vugs less than 2 inches are exceedingly common through out the deposit. The largest vug I have seen was approximately 15 feet long, with a diameter of 3 feet! A thick mud, probably kaolinite-rich, fills most of the large cavities…Almost all of the large vugs are surrounded by concentric fracture systems, and are at least in part collapsed, the collapsed debris often cemented with barite. The larger pockets have produced wall-plates weighing over 100 pounds.1 ”
1. Mineralogical Record, Joe Nagel, Vol. 12, 1981, p.99.

Northwest Territories, Baffin Island, Nanisivik Mine. “…translucent, white blocky crystals of barite up to 3 cm across have been found occupying small vugs and rectangular molds in dolomite near the hanging wall at both 39 North Portal and the Ocean view Deposit. The crystals are tabular on (001) and often elongated on [100] with large {001} pinacoids and {102} and {011} prisms. …’while high-quality specimens have not been found, the Ocean view property is in its early stages of development and better specimens may be forthcoming.1 ” The Nanisivik mine is better known for its specimens of pyrite which occur in a bewildering array of forms. The mine is located about 700 km north of the arctic circle and here the permafrost is 1500 meters deep. The pockets are full of ice and after specimens are collected the ice must be melted off to expose the crystals. During the summer months ice crystallizes on the mine workings to a depth of about a half a meter due to the moist “warm 10°C air pumped in from the surface for ventilation. See the interesting article cited below about the deposit and the specimens.
1. Mineralogical Record, Pete Dunn & Carl Francis, Vol. 21, 1990, p.521.

Nova Scotia, Pictou County. has produces a few striking white bladed buy almost blocky Barites growing on a black matrix which provides a pleasing contrast. You may never see one of these offered for sale.

Ontario
Madoc, Hastings County. The mines in this fluorite mining district are much better known for their fluorite crystals, transparent colorless to pale green sharp cubes than they are for the barite specimens they produced. “Next to fluorite, barite is the most abundant mineral in the Madoc fluorite mines. It occurs in a variety of colors, including beige, ale blue, and red and yellow, but white is by far the most common. It is most commonly massive, interbanded with fluorite and calcite, but stalactitic, columnar, nodular, fibrous and ocherous varieties have also been found. Probably the most commonly encountered habit of crystallization is cauliflower-like domes of small tabular crystals, although Wilson (1929) reports single crystals over 2 cm in diameter.1 All the mines in the Madoc area have been closed since1961 and no collecting is permitted at many of the by the current owners. Some of the mines have been so thoroughly reclaimed it is difficult to know that the site was at one time a mine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.91.
Bailey Mine. “The Bailey mine produced large specimens of green fluorite crystals, commonly encrusted by white barite. Early specimens of this type are in the collections fo the British Museum of Natural History, and the National Museum of Canada. …Wilson (1929)1 reports numerous large caverns in the underground workings, and notes one in particular: “In the drift southwest of the shaft (35 feet) beneath the Bailey farm house, a large open cavern was met in which stalactites and stalagmites of barite and fluorspar are said to have been present.”2
1. Wislon, AAM.E. (1929) Fluorspar Deposits of Canada, Canada Dept. of Mines, Geological Survey, Economic Geology Series, No. 6. 2.Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.88”
Keene Mine. “In the early 1940’s, some deep green crystals (of fluorite) associated with white, crested spheres of barite and pyrite crystals were found…One exceptional specimen of this type is in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum, and another is owned by Don Demaray, of London, Ontario.” The Keene mine has also been called the Kane or the Bradley mine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.88.
Rogers Mine. “In 1976 a few specimens of…(fluorite) crystals on barite were collected…However, collecting was limited due to the extremely shallow water table, and the easily available material was soon exhausted.”1 The Rogers mine was much better known for wonderful optically clear fluorite crystals up to 25 cm. The barite crystals talked about here were botryoidal masses of small bladed barites with nice fluorite crystals growing on them.
1. Mineralogical Record, Frank Melanson & George Robinson, Vol. 13, 1982, p.89.

Quebec, Chicoutimi, Niobec Mine. “Barite crystals line vugs up to 7 m in diameter in the Trenton limestone. These vugs, or more properly, solution cavities are encountered from time to time as drifting passes through the limestone to the ore. At least six major vugs have been encountered to date (June 1980) and additional ones may be expected. Most crystals are still attached to the walls but many are found in the floor rubble. The crystals all exhibit the typical, thick tabular form of barite with prominent basil pinacoids and the first and second order prisms. They range up to 40 cm in length and up to 20 kg in weight. Most crystals are singly terminated but a few doubly terminated ones have been found. All are transparent and of grayish color. About half the crystals are partially coated with a thin veneer of pyrite, which may in turn, may be mantled by a thin overgrowth of barite. Calcite and fluorite are associated with, and later than, the barite. The calcite occurs as interesting flattened scalenohedrons from 2 cm to 10 cm in diameter, somewhat resembling the “poker chip” calcite from Coahuila, Mexico. Fluorite occurs sparingly as pale green cubes to 8 mm on an edge, on the calcite, and occasionally as pale yellow microcrystals on the barite.”1 “These crystals are big, but they are usually damaged, not colorful, not very transparent, not very attractive, and not very desirable to collectors. I have not seen any of them offered for sale and am not unhappy about that. The Niobec mine’s main ore is pyrochlore which is mined for its niobium (columbium) content.
1. Mineralogical Record, Irwin Kennedy, Gilles Gagnon, Vol. 12, 1981, p.355-57.
Bill Dameron lists “Classic flat tabular 3.5 cm cream/white crystal, complete floater, with tinny pyrites on it. Scepter on matrix, 11 cm, with smaller, clearer scepters, 14 cm. One of the best from the mine. Also occurs with tiny calcite xls. Common.” Scepters of barite?

Yukon Territory, Itsy Mountains, near Macmillan Pass, Gunn Claim. “…a barium skarn deposit at the Gunn claim…where superb, rich, red gillespite occurs with pellet, sanbornite, taramellite, fresnoite, muirite and other species, including some tapered, blue barite crystals up to 13 cm long.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, What’s new in Minerals, Vol. 17, 1986, p.340.
Wrote George Robinson about what if anything has happened at this locality and asked about the nature of the barite crystals. Rod Tyson says that the only one he knows that has been to the claims that knows anything about minerals is Gary Ansell who is now retired and living near Nanaimo, BC. See if George Robinson has his email.


Yukon Territory, Richardson Mountains, Rock River, Patience Claim. “…there is a new barite locality at Rock River in the Richardson Mountains…The crystals form groups of tabular prisms up to 45 kg (100 lbs.) associated with pale yellow calcite. The crystals are reportedly gray when collected, but turn blue upon exposure to sunlight. The best are quite nearly as good as the more famous English material.”1 “The individual crystals were up to 5 inches and I sold one group that weighed close to 180 lbs. We dug perhaps a ton of specimens from a surface exposure found by Noranda during regular mineral exploration-we alter staked the occurrence as the Patience claim. The barites are gray-white to start and turn blue upon exposure to sunlight in a matter of 30 or 40 minuets. This locality is about 12 miles off the Dempster highway where it crosses the Rock River.”2 Notice that the description of the guy who dug the stuff is really a lot more meaningful than the brief note in the magazine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 17, 1986, p.339. 2 Rod Tyson, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, personal communication 2003.


China
Sichuan, Le Shan Prefecture, Er Mei Shan. The barite crystals from this locality are white and sometimes a little gray and are typically found growing on clear Arkansas type quartz crystals, although the quartz is usually not quite as shiny as good Arkansas crystals. The barites can reach 15 cm in size but are usually much smaller. Some of the barites are quite transparent, but none I have seen have reached the luster and transparency of good crystals from the Book Cliffs near Grand Junction Colorado. The barites are generally tabular in habit and have fairly complex terminations. The quartz specimens from this locality are much more abundant than the barites but the barite specimens from this locality are not scarce. Often the barites are difficult to distinguish from the quartz since they have similar color and transparency. Never the less some of the white prismatic quartz crystals with white tabular barites growing on them can be quite striking from this locality can be quite striking. On my 2002 trip to China, in Chang Sha I was offered perhaps 500 kgs of barite and quartz combinations priced at about $15 per kg. The problem was that many of the specimens were quite large, some 50 cm in diameter, and the barite crystals were rather small in comparison to the size of the specimens and most of the specimens had some damage. I decided that most of the specimens would not be of interest to collectors and my money would be better spent on other things, like good Brazilian amethyst at $4 per kg.

Hunan, Lou Di Prefecture, Leng Shui Jiang City, Kuang Shan, Xi Kuang Shan.
The barite crystals from this locality are usually spear shaped crystals up to at least 15 cm in length and 2 cm thick. They are cream to tan colored and are commonly found growing on drusy quartz. Sometimes they are associated with altered stibnite crystals. Specimens can reach a meter across. On my 2002 trip to China I bought about 200 kgs of specimens in Kuang Shan for $1000. Some of the specimens from this locality can be quite striking and although I am sure that I have not seen the best from this locality I don’t think any of them are going to be rated world class.

Hunan?
Golden barite crystals, tabular, most in the cm size range. Some of the better specimens sport crystals to 5 cm. The larger crystals are somewhat prismatic with spear shaped terminations. The larger crystals are not transparent but make pleasant specimens. Many of the specimens are more gray than golden, but most of these will most likely be left in the mine because they are not likely to be saleable.

Congo, The Republic of the. (Zaire)
Katanga. has produces some nice Barite and on Malachite combinations, but almost all that are offered on the market are heavily damaged. The one pictured here in the collection of the University of Paris is a good one, but not the best. Many of the more recent specimens have Barites that are more tabular and delicate. If political conditions change enough to allow large scale mining to resume in the Congo, there will be many wonderful specimen from these copper mines.

Congo, Republic of the
Kolwezi, Mashamba West Mine. “Some nice vugs of barite have been recovered which contain beautiful, transparent yellow or honey-colored crystals 2.4 cm, associated with malachite, cuprite and/or cobaltoan calcite. Most of the yellow barite is opaque and butterscotch-yellow to caramel-brown in color. The crystals have a relatively simple prismatic habit, sometimes occurring in attractive color combinations. Some colorless and transparent crystals to less than 1 cm have been found on malachite. Of particular interest are the multiphase pseudomorphs after barite. Most of the barite of the Mashamba West mine has been replaced by bright green malachite covered by pale-blue, earthy chrysocolla. The pseudomorph specimens have a rosette-cluster shape consisting of 3 to 5 cm blades up to 1 cm thick. The epimorphic coatings of chrysocolla are rounded.”1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p 17.

Katanga, Mulungwishi, Shangulowe Mine. “Translucent tabular crystals to 2 + cm w/malachite inclusions, pale green, undamaged 5 cm group. Also chisel point xls in parallel, 3.5 cm. Occurs in larger xls, usually not as gemmy. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, describing specimens in is collection.

Czech Republic
Příbor, Hončova Hůrka. “Perfectly developed bluish to colorless crystals, associate with calcite are known from vugs in picrite (magnesite?) at Hončova Hůrka…The most beautiful crystal found from this locality is about 15 cm in size.”1
1 Szakáll, Sándor, Minerals of the Carpathians, 2002, p. 256.

Uherksý Brod, Nezdenice. “Pale blue tabular crystals and twins (up to 2 cm) occur in vugs of andesites, where it is associated with siderite, calcite, and tridymite. The premium locality is Uherksý Brod…”1
1 Szakáll, Sándor, Minerals of the Carpathians, 2002, p. 256.

Příbram Ore Field, Brezové Hory District.
Ask Jaroslav about barites from Příbram. The 4 cm clear crystal pictured in the article in the Min Record, a Bement specimen, is likely to be a good one even if the article is a dud.

Bohemia, Tepliče Jenikov Quarry. The lone Czech dealer, J. Hyrsl, had a recent discovery of some very unusual and attractive barite from the Jenikov quarry near Tepliče,…The crystals, equant and blocky and very sharp, measure up to 3 cm across, and are scattered liberally over flat gray matrixes of a tough quartzite; the largest matrix on hand was about 12 cm across. The crystals are basically a deep orange, and near-gemmy, but a light frostedness on the faces makes them look brownish to gray from any distance. The find is about two years old; collecting is now proceeding, and there will be more of these aesthetically very appealing barites at the next Munich show and (presumably) thereafter.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Thomas Moore, Kopparberg show 1990 show, Vol. 22, 1991, p.47.

Bohemia, Pershteyn, Viimanou Mine. “Milky slightly pink blades to 3.5 cm in group coated w / tiny quartz xls, some fluorite. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, describing a specimen in is collection.
Ask Jarda about this locality, also check the Minerals of the Carpathians.

England
It is interesting to note that the Mineralogical Record magazine in its 25 year index has a great many references to Barites from all over the world but few for those from England. From Cumberland it has only one obscure entry for a Barite pseudomorph after Alstonite. There are however 33 entries for Barites from Colorado. The same pattern is also seen with relatively few mentions of Pyrite from Peru and amethyst from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil both of which have produced more good specimens of Pyrite and amethyst than probably all the other localities in the world combined. I think the reason is that the specimens from these localities is so well known and that no one feels the need to comment much about them. When Botley’s, the famous London mineral dealer moved to new quarters early in the 20th century they had a large number of “tea crates” full of Calcites and Barites Although with Cumberland Barites, presumably not of the best quality, that were in excess to what could be fitted into the new quarters. The excess were hauled down to the Thames river and thrown in. Nowadays however, the mines having been closed for many years, fine English Barites are hard to find. A good one will cost you several thousand dollars. Even a modest little specimen will likely cost several hundred dollars.

Cornwall, Meheniot, Wheal Mary Ann. The Barites from Wheal Mary Ann were tabular, more golden and not as large as those found in Cumberland but they were often had interesting associations of Fluorite, Sphalerite & Quartz.

Cumberland. Please excuse me it should now be correctly called Cumbria.
You could just collect Barite specimens from various mines in Cumberland, England and die a happy man. Many of the ones pictured here are specimens in the British Museum of Natural History. Specimens with crystals of only an inch or so are considered small from these localities and specimens with three and four inch crystals were not uncommon. It is common to see specimens of English barite labeled only Cumberland, England without a mine name, but this is very common for many mining districts of the world where most of the specimens are only given the name of the district rather than a particular mine name.
Cumbria, Appleby, Hilton Mine. “Clear but attractive iron stained flat prismatic crystals to 4 cm in groups. Occurs somewhat larger & very clear. Somewhat scarce.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Caldbeck Fells, Dry Gill. “White opaque tabular xl 5 + cm with classic mimetite (campylite) crystal balls. Scarce.1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Dufton. One crystal of Barite from Dufton weighed in at about 100 lbs. I am sure that is monster would have made a good door stop and been very impressive in a display for the general public or school children. “Large (10 cm) clear tabular xl. Also occurs prismatic and larger. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Egremont. Mines near Egremont also produced fine barite crystals.
Cumbria, Frizington, Parkside Mine. My particular favorites are the long slender translucent amber colored ones from the Parkside mine near Frizington. Some of them are doubly terminated and eight or ten inches long. The British Museum has one on display that has two long slender crystals flaring off the matrix that sort of hypnotized me. You know that you are looking at great mineral specimen when you wake up and realize that ten or fifteen minuets has passed without you knowing it. Frequently many of these and other Barites from the mines near Frizington are associated with tiny curved cream colored or tan dolomite crystals.
Cumbria, Frizington, Dalmellington Mine. Other fine somewhat prismatic Barites were found in the Dalmellington mine.
Cumbria, Frizington, Mowbray Mine. Perhaps most popular with collectors were the baby blue crystals, again on the ubiquitous tiny dolomite crystals from the Mowbray mine. These have always been considered drop dead classics and everyone wanted them in their collection. Also from Frizington and one of my favorites were the pinkish tan spear shaped crystals that had a white or cream colored zoning around the edges of the crystals.
Cumbria, Nenthead, Bromley Hill Mine. Specimens of barite after alstonite have been reported from the Bromley Hill mine.1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 24, 1993, p.394.

Derbyshire, Youlgreave, Arbor Low. Derbyshire is not known for fine crystals, but it did produce brown banded and stalactitic barite that you often see in old collections. These are often polished and look like a dark brown malachite often complete with “eyes”. “Brown, compact banded (“oakstone”) material was mined near the ancient stone circle at Arbor Low near Youlgreave…in the 19th century for ornamental purposed, and takes a high polish. This material was sometimes polished with ropes to dig hollows through the colored bands to give the effect of “eyes”. The exact locality was grassed over and lost for many years until rediscovered in recent times…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 14, 1983, p.23.

France
Saône-et Loire, Autun, Main-Reclesne Mine. “An interesting group of barite specimens were for sale in Al McGuinness’ room. The crystals from Le Man mine…were of a pleasing brownish yellow color and reached 10 cm (4 inches) in length…About half of the 35 specimens in the lot were cabinet size and the rest were large miniatures. Their pedigree was of note: personally collected by Pierre Bariand, curator of minerals at the Sorbonne (University of Paris).1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 194, 1978, p.194.

Gard Department, Saint Laurent le Minier, Les Malines Mine. “…has also recently produced large specimens of milky white barite rosettes, sometimes on botryoidal pyrite, covered with a thin film of sulfur, topped by clear tabular sulfur crystals to 7 cm.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
See if you can find out how much stuff was produced.

Gard Department, Saint Laurent le Ninier. “Eric (Asselborn) also found a quantity of snow-white barite in radial clusters to 5 cm, sometimes grouped in a fine-grained dolomitic rock from Saint Laurent le Niner.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 21, 1990, p.489.
Contact Eric and ask him about this find. Is this from Les Malines Mine above?

Indre, Chaillac. “Small (0.7) cm reddish-tinged blades in 11 cm masses group, Relatively common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
See if you can find out more about this loclaity.

Puy de Dôme Department, Chantelguyon, Ravin de Sans-Souci. “Tabular lozenge-shaped crystals of barite on a granite matrix were also found at Ravin de Sans-Souci…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
See if you can find out how much stuff was produced and how big the got and what color they were and how shiny and or transparent.

Puy de Dôme Department, Olliox Cote d’Abot. “Large partially gemmy barite crystals to 15 cm have recently been collected at Cote d’Abot… .”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
You should be able to find out more about this locality.
Puy de Dôme Department, Four La Brouque. “Alan Carion…Paris, France had two new items of interest from France at the Tucson show:. Aragonite from Gergorie, and barite from Four La Brouque…the barite exists as sharp, very well formed, blocky, yellow-gray, single crystals up to about 8 cm.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.337.
Find out from Alan Carion how many of the specimens came from this locality.

Var Department, Esterel, Font Sante Mine. This mine is perhaps better known for its fluorite specimens which are often associated with barite, but fine barite specimens have also been found here. “Barite …is plentiful and very fine specimens have turned up, with white, cream or clear, colorless, curved blades up to 25 cm. Delicate “butterflies,” covered with drusy quartz rest attractively on the fluorite. Attractive rosaete forms also result, with vistas into the colored fluorite beneath. Pale, clear yellow blades contain parallel acicular inclusions which appear to be a sulfide.”1 Specimens at this mine were formerly more abundant before mechanized mining and on site acid treatment of the ore.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p.309.

Germany
Harz Mountains, Clausthal. These bladed barite crystals are coated with goethite? are not much to look at but they are from a famous old locality.

Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Rankachtal, Oberwolfach, Grube Clara. This mine has produced pointed barite specimens for over a 100 years. Locally, barite is called meisselspat (chisel spar). These specimens are confined mostly to Germany because of the local interest. In this regard they are like the barite specimens from Palos Verde, near Los Angeles, California that are mostly of interest to local collectors. In the Mineral business you can indeed make money by taking coal to Newcastel, especially after Newcastle stopped producing coal. Grube Clara is the last mining operating in an old mining district. The earliest mining documents date from 1652. Since 1850 the mine has produced barite and even recently fine specimens have been found. The mine is also known for water clear fluorite crystals and fine but small secondary minerals (this means micromounts). …collectors are admitted to the dumps at the barite mill near Wolfach for a fee of about $1.1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p 306.

Sauerland, Dreislar. “Wright’s Rock Shop has acquired a new lot of very impressive, large (25-30 cm) groups of thick, pink and white, bladed barite crystals from Dreislar, Most are sprinkled with lustrous chalcopyrite disphenoids, and are exceptionally good for the locality.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 20, 1989. P. 398.
Ask Helmut Bruckner how much of this material there was and the nature of the crystals and a better locality.

Saxony, Erzgebirge, Obersachsen, Crottendorf, Pöhla Uranium Mine. “At the same dealer’s stand (Ben de Wit) were some large, spectacular groups of the new golden barite from the Pöhla uranium mine…The resemblance this time is to the well-known golden barites from the Eagle mine, Colorado. The crystals are bright, gemmy, deep orange tablets to 4 co on an edge in groups to 12 cm ($650), and also one 25 x 30-cm group ($1500).”1 “Only about 200 decent specimens have been found. …collected over the last 4 to 5 years. …Transparent yellow-brown crystals up to 12 cm were found initially, but more recent crystals are generally a lighter yellow dolor and smaller in size (up to 5 cm). Specimens range from miniature size to large cabinet size.”2 This last bit was apparently reported by Ben De Wit to Wendell Wilson at the Denver show in 1986. Many more specimens made their appearance at the Munich and Ste.-Marie-aux-Mines shows(Sotheby's 2001 auction of the Joseph Freilich collection)(Sotheby's 2001 auction of the Joseph Freilich collection) in 1988.
1. Mineralogical Record, Notes from Germany, Thomas Moore, Munich show 1986, Vol. 18, 1987, p.161. 1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 18, 1987, p.147.

Rheinland-Pfalz, Baumholder, Ruschberg, Clarashall Mine. “Clear parallel xls to 1.5 cm w / red tips and scattered tiny cinnabar xls. 4x5 cm. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Find out more about this locality.

Greece
Attica Peninsula, Laurium. “Predominant gangue of the secondary ore zones of the Kamaréza and Plaka mines, occurring as white nodules, lamellar aggregates to 10 cm long and tabular crystals associated with P2 and K2 suites.”1 The mines are on the coast of the Aegean Sea about 25 miles south east of Athens. The Greeks began lead and silver mining there about 600 BC. And the workings were abandoned about 100 AD. A French mining company began mining zinc in the area in the middle of the 19th century. Thousands of mine shafts have been sunk in the region. The Plaka and Kamaréza mines are the names of the tow major mines worked by the French. An article on the mines and minerals but short on pictures of minerals from the locality is in the Mineralogical Record.2
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 7, 1976, p.123. 2. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 7, 1976, p.114-125.

Northern Greece. “…rectangulary shaped “window” crystals of red hematite edged clear barite up to 2 cm on matrix…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 18, 1978, p.134.
You should really see if you can run down this locality.

Seriphos, Almiros, Koutalas and Aghia Trias. “Tabular, colorless and transparent crystals of barite showing a slightly curved habit have been found near the villages of Almiros, Koutalas and Aghia Trias.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Gilbert Gauthier & Nicholaos Albandakis, Vol. 22, 1991, p.304.
Ask Gilbert Gauthier about the barites from this locality and the Andradites. Nicholaos Albandakis’s address is given as 112 Iron Constandopoulou, 16346 Athens, Greece.

Italy
Sardinia, Cagliara, Silius. “Among the new items Herb Obodda had more than a hundred specimens of yellowish-white barite from Silius, near Cagliara…The crystals were lustrous, well formed, commonly on matrix and sometimes containing phantoms. The specimens were mostly small cabinet size and carried crystals to 8 cm.”
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 9, 1978, p.192.
Ask Herb how many of the specimens were collected and what kind of mine they came from and if there was a mine name.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Barega Mine. “The Barega mine, not far from Iglesias, is a famous for large, yellow barite crystals. Smaller barite crystals have been found in many outcrops on a small hill near Villamassargia.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Gianni Porcellini, Vol. 15, 1984, p.372.
The address of Gianni Porcellini is given as via Giarabub, 6, 47047 Rimini, Italy. See if you can find out how big the crystals and specimens get and what the production of this kind of specimen was.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Villa Margarosa Cave. “Golden, transparent, zoned tabular xls to 2 cm in group. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
See if you can find out more about this locality.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Mount Onixedou. “Clear prismatic xls to 3 cm matrix, 4.5x7cm. Scarce?”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

Sardinia. “Kristalle imported some very find specimens of blue barite crystals to several inches on large pieces of matrix from Sardinia. The crystals are moderately thin and stand up handsomely on the matrix. No small specimens were available but the cabinet pieces were superb.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p.282.
Ask Donna what the locality was and the dimensions, cost etc. How many specimens, what was the locality etc.

Japan
Speaking only of Japanese barites: “There are so many localities of beautiful and large crystals of barite that only a few will be mentioned here. Most of the fine crystals of barite occur in metal sulfide veins or Kuroko type deposits. Wide varieties of crystal habits have been reported. Commonly observed habits are platy, rhombic, six-sided or eight-sided forms, depending on the combination of faces. Prismatic crystals elongated parallel to a, b or c axes are also not rare. Very unusual is a habit resembling dodecahedral crystals of cubic system, consisting of well developed (110), (001), (011, (010) and several other faces. Crystals larger than 5 cm in diameter have been found from many localities, such as follows; Akaiwa, Shiribeshi Province Hokkaido; Yunosawa mine, Aomori Prefecture; Osarizawa mine, Akita Prefecture; Hassei mine, Akita Prefecture; Sado mine, Niigata Prefecture; Kusakura mine, Niigata Prefecture; Kuratani mine, Ishikawa Prefecture.”1 Japanese barites are not going to put the English barites out of business any time soon.
Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p..

Akita Prefecture, Tamagawa Hot Spring. The barite from this locality when first found was thought to be a new mineral because it contained some lead and was mildly radioactive. It was later found at Hokutō Hot springs in Taiwan and given the name hokutolite. This material was later found to be only a lead bearing barite and the name was discredited. “The mineral was designated as a special natural monument of the nation in 1952, and cannot be collected without the permission of the Government. …The plumbian barite is precipitated as pale yellow transparent crystals of rhombic platy habit of a few millimeters in diameter on the wall around the spout of hot springs or around the water fall near the mouth of hot springs. …Crystals thus precipitated form banded crustification consisting of short prismatic or fibrous crystals of yellowish brown and pale reddish brown in alternating zoning...The precipitation rate of crustification is estimated to be 7 mm/year.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.177-8.

Akita Prefecture, Osarizawa Mine. Crystals from this mine reach at least 6 cm. There is a picture of a good specimen about 17 cm across with tabular crystals up to about 6 cm pictured in the book Introduction to Japanese Minerals.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.178.
You really need more information about Japanese barites. Color, maximum crystal size, abundance etc. What kind of mines are the Osarizawa and Sado mines?

Niigata Prefecture, Sado Mine. Flat spear shaped crystals from this mine reach at least 12 cm. A good specimen is pictured in the Introduction of Japanese Minerals.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.177.

Kazakhstan
Dzhezkazgan. “Flesh colored opaque thin blades to 2 cm in 4 cm spray w/ quartz, calcite & chalcopyrite. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

Kyrgyzstan, Osh Oblast, Kadamzhay. “Attractive clear yellowish tabular 5 cm blade w / small stibnite blades piercing it. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.



Edited 6 time(s). Last edit at 05/08/2009 12:47PM by Rock Currier.
Re: Best Minerals - Barite
March 24, 2009 08:05AM
What happened to the y ?

Cheers,
Etienne
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Barite
March 24, 2009 08:20AM
Etienne,
I don't understand your question, but then again, sometimes I am not all that bright.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Barite
March 24, 2009 10:01AM
The correct IMA approved spelling is Baryte. Barite is an americanism.

Jolyon
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Barite
March 24, 2009 12:12PM
Isn't Baryte the way everyone spells it?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 12:17PM
    
Rock, in the link on the best minerals listing it is spelled with an "i" you might want to change that one.

Cheers

Harjo
Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 12:28PM
I also continue to write Barite, sometimes.
Rock, we can ask to IMA to rename correctly Barite? In italian, barite comes from Bario, the constituent element. Really I don't understand this "y". Simone
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 12:46PM
Hee Hee :D
I didn't to the spelling on that link. Lets see if he who did reads this and changes it.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 01:05PM
    
As a Canadian, with cultural feet in both the US and Europe, allow me to weigh in on this. Jolyon has cocked an Old Europe snoot with his "yte" (I am sure with his usual tongue in cheek), and in some instances he would have a point with his Americanism complaint (examples surely not needed!). But not this time. The use of "baryte" is quaint but anachronistic and is inconsistent with other mineral names, not to mention 99.99% of the English language. It really needs to be changed to "barite" if for no other reason than that clarity and consistency in scientific terms is paramount. Also, it looks really silly. Blake wrote "Tyger, Tyger" but we are not poets here: we should be steely-eyed, cold, and precise.(:P)

Tony
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 01:46PM
I would be very happy to rename the mineral to barite, however the correct current name according to the IMA lists is baryte, and we can't arbitrarily change that whether we would want to or not.

[pubsites.uws.edu.au]

It's not unique with the bary for barium, there is barylite and barysilite - should these be changed too? And barytocalcite of course.

Similarly, it's sulphur not sulfur. Although confusingly, we have sulphotsumoite but sulfohalite and sulfoborite.

aluminium not aluminum

Every language has its own variation on mineral names. It's baryt in German, baritina in Spanish, and barite in American! But none of those are the official IMA spelling!

If the IMA do decide to rename baryte, then we will of course switch to using the new name on the site, but until then we should ensure that EVERY name we use is consistent with the IMA list as linked above.

Jolyon



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/24/2009 01:52PM by Jolyon Ralph.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 02:41PM
    
Hello,

Baryte is derived from the ancient barys, which means heavy, due to the high density of baryte.

To give some input, here some Baryte localities in Germany, which have produced bigger specimen and/or xls:

North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Holzen, Calcite quarry
North Rhine-Westphalia, Sauerland, Dreislar Baryte mine
Saxony, Erzgebirge Mts., Pöhla, Pöhla Uranium mine (Kunnersbach vein) [very nice honey-coloured xls up to several cm]
Saxony, Erzgebirge Mts., Freiberg mining district (especially Beihilfe mine with 10 cm + white roses on good fluorite cubes)
Rhineland-Palatinate, Hunsrück, Baumholder, Clarashall mine
Hesse, Wetterau, Rockenberg sand quarries (sedimentary baryte roses)
Hesse, Odenwald, Ober-Kaisbach [blue barytes] and several other localities
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Kinzig Valley, Wolfach, Clara mine [very good xls of different types from thumbnail to 20 cm +, especially the grey, yellow, blue to brown chissel spar variety is well known, cavities up to meter-size are known]
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Wieden (especially Anton and Tannenboden mine)
Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Urberg, Gottesehre mine

This is just a little synopsis, not a full list of localities.

Regards,
Sebastian Möller
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 05:46PM
Someone should talk to Bill Dameron about contributing to this page, if he isn't reading and preparing already!

[www.baritespecimenlocalities.org]
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 09:16PM
Jolyon, That has been in the back of my mine for about a week. OK, Ill get in touch with Bill and see if he is interested.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 09:33PM
Here is some barite information that I worked on a while back. For the brave sole(s) that decide to tackle the barite article(s) they can use the information as a point of departure. The first thing they should do is to go through all the mindat barite images and copy down the localities and the urls of the possible pictures they want to use. I find that a notepad or word document is good for this kind of thing. You can do a lot of Crtl+C and Ctrl+V and make note of the localities and images you want to work with quickly. Even if you only want to work on Barite from only a particular country, let me know and Ill set up a thread for you to get started on.

Barite
BaSO4
Barite is a common mineral that often occurs in good crystals. It is a soft mineral and has very good cleavage(s) and is easily chipped and scratched. It is hard to keep specimens of Barite undamaged over a long period of time. There are so many good localities for this mineral it is hard to know where to begin. Certainly there must be at more than a hundred localities that have produced fine specimens. Historically however most collectors and curators would agree that England has probably produced the best barite crystals and of many different kinds. During the last ten years, however, some wonderful golden barite crystals have been found at the Meikle mine in Nevada, USA that some feel are the finest barite crystals found to date. Fine specimens of these have sold for thousands of dollars.
Barite is the most common barium containing mineral. It is found in a wide variety of geological environments; hydrothermal metalliferous veins in limestones and other sedimentary rocks, in clay deposits, hematite deposits and in lake and marine deposits, in amygdaloidal cavities in basic igneous flows and in hot spring deposits. It is often mined for industrial use. Millions of tons of barite have been mined to make “drilling mud” which is used in oil well drilling. The density of barite in this mud helps contain the high pressures sometimes encountered in drilling these wells from blowing out the well.
There are thousands of localities for barite. The choice of localities included here has been somewhat arbitrary but include many of the more prominent localities that produce good specimens. Many localities have been excluded because of the small crystal size or nondescript nature of the barites found there. Let me know if you have a favorite barite locality that I have not mentioned here and we will see what we can do to include it. Many localities produce fine specimens of microscopic barite crystals but I do not list them here. In that direction is madness. A good article by Bill Henderson in the Mineralogical record talks about a few of them and has pictures of them. Look up this article if you are interested.1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p 61-64.

Australia
New South Wales, Prospect Hill, Prospect Quarry. This basalt quarry is better know for its fine prehnite specimens than its barite. But “Barite was the last of the minerals to crystallize in the vugs. It is very rare and specimens are found very occasionally. It has been observed as tabular white crystals in parallel groups to 1 cm across on drusy siderite (Australian Museum specimen D35330), rosettes of pale brown, transparent, tabular crystals to 4 mm across on white calcite Australian Museum specimen D38535) and similar rosettes on drusy marcasite (George Dale collection) from the sheared gabbroic dolerite exposed between the Widemere and Prospect quarries.”1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 25, 1994, p 188.

Queensland, Mount Isa. “Barite is one of the more spectacular minerals occurring at Mount Isa. The best specimens come from the copper orebodies. Beautiful, golden brown, flattened tabular to prismatic crystals to 4 cm occur associated with native copper (often altered to malachite) within a honeycomb siliceous sinter. The sinter was found in large masses on 4 level within the Black Rock open cut. The barite is clouded by native copper inclusions. Plates exceeding 30 cm were found but few have survived. Some large, golden brown, prismatic crystals to 10 cm with copper, chalcopyrite and pyrite inclusions were also found. Occasional yellow-brown, blocky prismatic to tabular crystals up to 10 cm in length, some doubly terminated, have emerged from various fault zones within the copper orebodies. Some attractive barite clusters have been found in sepiolite and palygorskite fault fill from within the silver-lead-zinc orebodies. A notable occurrence was on 16D sublevel where yellow clusters to 3 cm across were found enclosed within sepiolite. The clusters are composed of thick, bladed crystals up to 1 cm long, forming as elongated rosettes. The miners use high-pressure hoses to blast the sepiolite and palygorskite in such faults. The result is that literally rains barite crystals.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.478.

South Australia, Burra Burra Mine. “Sharp, lustrous crystals of barite up to 2 cm with azurite, malachite and libethenite on chrysocolla on quartzite matrix were found. The crystals, of a bladed to tabular habit, are transparent and range from colorless to pale yellow. Barite was also found as fawn-brown nodules to 7 cm across, the centers of which are buggy and lined with minute colorless barite crystals and occasional hemispheres of malachite.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 25, 1994, p.127.

South Australia, Flinders Ranges, Oraparinna. “Parallel group of golden blocky xls to 2 cm. gemmy tips. 2.5 cm. somewhat scarce.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of specimens in his collection.

Tasmania, Rosenbery Mine. “Nice specimens of transparent yellow barite came from the Rosenbery mine in the 1970’s. The crystals are up to 2 cm long on plates up to 20 cm across.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.385.

Victoria, Phillip Island, Red Cliff Head. “Snow-white aggregates of platy barite crystals up to 7 mm across form attractive combinations with orange chabazite at Red Cliff Head on Phillip Island. Similar crystals have also been observed with ferrierite, calcite or chalcedony at Red Bluff and several other localities.”1 These barites are found in amygdaloidal pockets in Tertiary age basalts. A good article about the zeolites and associated minerals from Red Cliff Head, Philip Island and Flinders is sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.457.

Brazil
Paraiba, João Pessoa. “…Dr. Reinhard Wegner of the Federal University in Campina Grande, Paraiba, has obtained some rather attractive small groups of barite crystals from a limestone quarry near João Pessoa…The crystals vary in color from colorless to pale yellow to gray, and from bladed, tabular aggregates up to about 8 cm, though most are in the 2 to 5-cm range. Some of the aggregates form quite good rosettes. Pyrite and calcite are sometimes present.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p.387.

Sao Paulo, Jacupirananga. “Barite is very rarely found as clear, yellow prismatic crystals up to 1 cm perched on dolomite crystals in vugs in high-M gO1 carbonatite from zone 2.” Jacupirananga is a carbonatite deposit mined for its apatite content and is better know for a whole range of interesting other, mostly micro minerals. See the interesting article sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 15, 1984, p.264.

Bulgaria
Madan Orefield. “Barite, the principal sulfate minerals in the veins is of limited distribution. The milky, grayish white to yellow-brown crystals are semi-opaque, and occur zonally associated with fine-grained quartz, pyrite, galena, calcite, kaolinite and other minerals.”1 The Madan Orefield is better known for its galena, sphalerite and other minerals. The mines in this district have been worked for base metals since the fifth or sixth centuries BC. See the interesting article sited below.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p.441.

Canada
British Colombia, Grand Forks, Rock Candy Mine. The Candy mine is noted for its green fluorite and golden barite specimens. When they are associated with each other they specimens can be striking. The best specimens are the golden tabular, diamond shaped barite crystals up to about 10 cm growing on somewhat rough green fluorite octahedrons. On a good weekend a hard working collector could come away with one to two hundred specimens if he got lucky and if he were very lucky he might get two or three find specimens. Almost all the good specimens collected here were dug by dedicated field collectors with hand tools. The locality has produced specimens for many hears. Over the years collectors and commercial collectors have beaten this locality to death and some the property owners have effectively blasted the workings shut for fear that someone would be killed in the increasingly dangerous workings. Most of the better specimens came from a big mostly open stope in the upper workings that were open to the surface. The best specimens from here would sell for more than $1000 each, but lesser specimens can be found from time to time for less than $100. The Rock Candy mine is a fluorite mine that started operation in 1918 and the first production of a few hundred tons was taken out by pack animals. The mine was worked on three levels and the stopes eventually broke through to the surface. All told the mine produced perhaps 50,000 tons of fluorite. “The most important feature of the deposit with respect to the collector is the abundance and size of the cavities. Small vugs less than 2 inches are exceedingly common through out the deposit. The largest vug I have seen was approximately 15 feet long, with a diameter of 3 feet! A thick mud, probably kaolinite-rich, fills most of the large cavities…Almost all of the large vugs are surrounded by concentric fracture systems, and are at least in part collapsed, the collapsed debris often cemented with barite. The larger pockets have produced wall-plates weighing over 100 pounds.1 ”
1. Mineralogical Record, Joe Nagel, Vol. 12, 1981, p.99.

Northwest Territories, Baffin Island, Nanisivik Mine. “…translucent, white blocky crystals of barite up to 3 cm across have been found occupying small vugs and rectangular molds in dolomite near the hanging wall at both 39 North Portal and the Ocean view Deposit. The crystals are tabular on (001) and often elongated on [100] with large {001} pinacoids and {102} and {011} prisms. …’while high-quality specimens have not been found, the Ocean view property is in its early stages of development and better specimens may be forthcoming.1 ” The Nanisivik mine is better known for its specimens of pyrite which occur in a bewildering array of forms. The mine is located about 700 km north of the arctic circle and here the permafrost is 1500 meters deep. The pockets are full of ice and after specimens are collected the ice must be melted off to expose the crystals. During the summer months ice crystallizes on the mine workings to a depth of about a half a meter due to the moist “warm 10°C air pumped in from the surface for ventilation. See the interesting article cited below about the deposit and the specimens.
1. Mineralogical Record, Pete Dunn & Carl Francis, Vol. 21, 1990, p.521.

Nova Scotia, Pictou County. has produces a few striking white bladed buy almost blocky Barites growing on a black matrix which provides a pleasing contrast. You may never see one of these offered for sale.

Ontario
Madoc, Hastings County. The mines in this fluorite mining district are much better known for their fluorite crystals, transparent colorless to pale green sharp cubes than they are for the barite specimens they produced. “Next to fluorite, barite is the most abundant mineral in the Madoc fluorite mines. It occurs in a variety of colors, including beige, ale blue, and red and yellow, but white is by far the most common. It is most commonly massive, interbanded with fluorite and calcite, but stalactitic, columnar, nodular, fibrous and ocherous varieties have also been found. Probably the most commonly encountered habit of crystallization is cauliflower-like domes of small tabular crystals, although Wilson (1929) reports single crystals over 2 cm in diameter.1 All the mines in the Madoc area have been closed since1961 and no collecting is permitted at many of the by the current owners. Some of the mines have been so thoroughly reclaimed it is difficult to know that the site was at one time a mine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.91.
Bailey Mine. “The Bailey mine produced large specimens of green fluorite crystals, commonly encrusted by white barite. Early specimens of this type are in the collections fo the British Museum of Natural History, and the National Museum of Canada. …Wilson (1929)1 reports numerous large caverns in the underground workings, and notes one in particular: “In the drift southwest of the shaft (35 feet) beneath the Bailey farm house, a large open cavern was met in which stalactites and stalagmites of barite and fluorspar are said to have been present.”2
1. Wislon, AAM.E. (1929) Fluorspar Deposits of Canada, Canada Dept. of Mines, Geological Survey, Economic Geology Series, No. 6. 2.Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.88”
Keene Mine. “In the early 1940’s, some deep green crystals (of fluorite) associated with white, crested spheres of barite and pyrite crystals were found…One exceptional specimen of this type is in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum, and another is owned by Don Demaray, of London, Ontario.” The Keene mine has also been called the Kane or the Bradley mine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 13, 1982, p.88.
Rogers Mine. “In 1976 a few specimens of…(fluorite) crystals on barite were collected…However, collecting was limited due to the extremely shallow water table, and the easily available material was soon exhausted.”1 The Rogers mine was much better known for wonderful optically clear fluorite crystals up to 25 cm. The barite crystals talked about here were botryoidal masses of small bladed barites with nice fluorite crystals growing on them.
1. Mineralogical Record, Frank Melanson & George Robinson, Vol. 13, 1982, p.89.

Quebec, Chicoutimi, Niobec Mine. “Barite crystals line vugs up to 7 m in diameter in the Trenton limestone. These vugs, or more properly, solution cavities are encountered from time to time as drifting passes through the limestone to the ore. At least six major vugs have been encountered to date (June 1980) and additional ones may be expected. Most crystals are still attached to the walls but many are found in the floor rubble. The crystals all exhibit the typical, thick tabular form of barite with prominent basil pinacoids and the first and second order prisms. They range up to 40 cm in length and up to 20 kg in weight. Most crystals are singly terminated but a few doubly terminated ones have been found. All are transparent and of grayish color. About half the crystals are partially coated with a thin veneer of pyrite, which may in turn, may be mantled by a thin overgrowth of barite. Calcite and fluorite are associated with, and later than, the barite. The calcite occurs as interesting flattened scalenohedrons from 2 cm to 10 cm in diameter, somewhat resembling the “poker chip” calcite from Coahuila, Mexico. Fluorite occurs sparingly as pale green cubes to 8 mm on an edge, on the calcite, and occasionally as pale yellow microcrystals on the barite.”1 “These crystals are big, but they are usually damaged, not colorful, not very transparent, not very attractive, and not very desirable to collectors. I have not seen any of them offered for sale and am not unhappy about that. The Niobec mine’s main ore is pyrochlore which is mined for its niobium (columbium) content.
1. Mineralogical Record, Irwin Kennedy, Gilles Gagnon, Vol. 12, 1981, p.355-57.
Bill Dameron lists “Classic flat tabular 3.5 cm cream/white crystal, complete floater, with tinny pyrites on it. Scepter on matrix, 11 cm, with smaller, clearer scepters, 14 cm. One of the best from the mine. Also occurs with tiny calcite xls. Common.” Scepters of barite?

Yukon Territory, Itsy Mountains, near Macmillan Pass, Gunn Claim. “…a barium skarn deposit at the Gunn claim…where superb, rich, red gillespite occurs with pellet, sanbornite, taramellite, fresnoite, muirite and other species, including some tapered, blue barite crystals up to 13 cm long.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, What’s new in Minerals, Vol. 17, 1986, p.340.
Wrote George Robinson about what if anything has happened at this locality and asked about the nature of the barite crystals. Rod Tyson says that the only one he knows that has been to the claims that knows anything about minerals is Gary Ansell who is now retired and living near Nanaimo, BC. See if George Robinson has his email.


Yukon Territory, Richardson Mountains, Rock River, Patience Claim. “…there is a new barite locality at Rock River in the Richardson Mountains…The crystals form groups of tabular prisms up to 45 kg (100 lbs.) associated with pale yellow calcite. The crystals are reportedly gray when collected, but turn blue upon exposure to sunlight. The best are quite nearly as good as the more famous English material.”1 “The individual crystals were up to 5 inches and I sold one group that weighed close to 180 lbs. We dug perhaps a ton of specimens from a surface exposure found by Noranda during regular mineral exploration-we alter staked the occurrence as the Patience claim. The barites are gray-white to start and turn blue upon exposure to sunlight in a matter of 30 or 40 minuets. This locality is about 12 miles off the Dempster highway where it crosses the Rock River.”2 Notice that the description of the guy who dug the stuff is really a lot more meaningful than the brief note in the magazine.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 17, 1986, p.339. 2 Rod Tyson, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, personal communication 2003.


China
Sichuan, Le Shan Prefecture, Er Mei Shan. The barite crystals from this locality are white and sometimes a little gray and are typically found growing on clear Arkansas type quartz crystals, although the quartz is usually not quite as shiny as good Arkansas crystals. The barites can reach 15 cm in size but are usually much smaller. Some of the barites are quite transparent, but none I have seen have reached the luster and transparency of good crystals from the Book Cliffs near Grand Junction Colorado. The barites are generally tabular in habit and have fairly complex terminations. The quartz specimens from this locality are much more abundant than the barites but the barite specimens from this locality are not scarce. Often the barites are difficult to distinguish from the quartz since they have similar color and transparency. Never the less some of the white prismatic quartz crystals with white tabular barites growing on them can be quite striking from this locality can be quite striking. On my 2002 trip to China, in Chang Sha I was offered perhaps 500 kgs of barite and quartz combinations priced at about $15 per kg. The problem was that many of the specimens were quite large, some 50 cm in diameter, and the barite crystals were rather small in comparison to the size of the specimens and most of the specimens had some damage. I decided that most of the specimens would not be of interest to collectors and my money would be better spent on other things, like good Brazilian amethyst at $4 per kg.

Hunan, Lou Di Prefecture, Leng Shui Jiang City, Kuang Shan, Xi Kuang Shan.
The barite crystals from this locality are usually spear shaped crystals up to at least 15 cm in length and 2 cm thick. They are cream to tan colored and are commonly found growing on drusy quartz. Sometimes they are associated with altered stibnite crystals. Specimens can reach a meter across. On my 2002 trip to China I bought about 200 kgs of specimens in Kuang Shan for $1000. Some of the specimens from this locality can be quite striking and although I am sure that I have not seen the best from this locality I don’t think any of them are going to be rated world class.

Hunan?
Golden barite crystals, tabular, most in the cm size range. Some of the better specimens sport crystals to 5 cm. The larger crystals are somewhat prismatic with spear shaped terminations. The larger crystals are not transparent but make pleasant specimens. Many of the specimens are more gray than golden, but most of these will most likely be left in the mine because they are not likely to be saleable.

Congo, The Republic of the. (Zaire)
Katanga. has produces some nice Barite and on Malachite combinations, but almost all that are offered on the market are heavily damaged. The one pictured here in the collection of the University of Paris is a good one, but not the best. Many of the more recent specimens have Barites that are more tabular and delicate. If political conditions change enough to allow large scale mining to resume in the Congo, there will be many wonderful specimen from these copper mines.

Congo, Republic of the
Kolwezi, Mashamba West Mine. “Some nice vugs of barite have been recovered which contain beautiful, transparent yellow or honey-colored crystals 2.4 cm, associated with malachite, cuprite and/or cobaltoan calcite. Most of the yellow barite is opaque and butterscotch-yellow to caramel-brown in color. The crystals have a relatively simple prismatic habit, sometimes occurring in attractive color combinations. Some colorless and transparent crystals to less than 1 cm have been found on malachite. Of particular interest are the multiphase pseudomorphs after barite. Most of the barite of the Mashamba West mine has been replaced by bright green malachite covered by pale-blue, earthy chrysocolla. The pseudomorph specimens have a rosette-cluster shape consisting of 3 to 5 cm blades up to 1 cm thick. The epimorphic coatings of chrysocolla are rounded.”1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 22, 1991, p 17.

Katanga, Mulungwishi, Shangulowe Mine. “Translucent tabular crystals to 2 + cm w/malachite inclusions, pale green, undamaged 5 cm group. Also chisel point xls in parallel, 3.5 cm. Occurs in larger xls, usually not as gemmy. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, describing specimens in is collection.

Czech Republic
Příbor, Hončova Hůrka. “Perfectly developed bluish to colorless crystals, associate with calcite are known from vugs in picrite (magnesite?) at Hončova Hůrka…The most beautiful crystal found from this locality is about 15 cm in size.”1
1 Szakáll, Sándor, Minerals of the Carpathians, 2002, p. 256.

Uherksý Brod, Nezdenice. “Pale blue tabular crystals and twins (up to 2 cm) occur in vugs of andesites, where it is associated with siderite, calcite, and tridymite. The premium locality is Uherksý Brod…”1
1 Szakáll, Sándor, Minerals of the Carpathians, 2002, p. 256.

Příbram Ore Field, Brezové Hory District.
Ask Jaroslav about barites from Příbram. The 4 cm clear crystal pictured in the article in the Min Record, a Bement specimen, is likely to be a good one even if the article is a dud.

Bohemia, Tepliče Jenikov Quarry. The lone Czech dealer, J. Hyrsl, had a recent discovery of some very unusual and attractive barite from the Jenikov quarry near Tepliče,…The crystals, equant and blocky and very sharp, measure up to 3 cm across, and are scattered liberally over flat gray matrixes of a tough quartzite; the largest matrix on hand was about 12 cm across. The crystals are basically a deep orange, and near-gemmy, but a light frostedness on the faces makes them look brownish to gray from any distance. The find is about two years old; collecting is now proceeding, and there will be more of these aesthetically very appealing barites at the next Munich show and (presumably) thereafter.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Thomas Moore, Kopparberg show 1990 show, Vol. 22, 1991, p.47.

Bohemia, Pershteyn, Viimanou Mine. “Milky slightly pink blades to 3.5 cm in group coated w / tiny quartz xls, some fluorite. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, describing a specimen in is collection.
Ask Jarda about this locality, also check the Minerals of the Carpathians.

England
It is interesting to note that the Mineralogical Record magazine in its 25 year index has a great many references to Barites from all over the world but few for those from England. From Cumberland it has only one obscure entry for a Barite pseudomorph after Alstonite. There are however 33 entries for Barites from Colorado. The same pattern is also seen with relatively few mentions of Pyrite from Peru and amethyst from Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil both of which have produced more good specimens of Pyrite and amethyst than probably all the other localities in the world combined. I think the reason is that the specimens from these localities is so well known and that no one feels the need to comment much about them. When Botley’s, the famous London mineral dealer moved to new quarters early in the 20th century they had a large number of “tea crates” full of Calcites and Barites Although with Cumberland Barites, presumably not of the best quality, that were in excess to what could be fitted into the new quarters. The excess were hauled down to the Thames river and thrown in. Nowadays however, the mines having been closed for many years, fine English Barites are hard to find. A good one will cost you several thousand dollars. Even a modest little specimen will likely cost several hundred dollars.

Cornwall, Meheniot, Wheal Mary Ann. The Barites from Wheal Mary Ann were tabular, more golden and not as large as those found in Cumberland but they were often had interesting associations of Fluorite, Sphalerite & Quartz.

Cumberland. Please excuse me it should now be correctly called Cumbria.
You could just collect Barite specimens from various mines in Cumberland, England and die a happy man. Many of the ones pictured here are specimens in the British Museum of Natural History. Specimens with crystals of only an inch or so are considered small from these localities and specimens with three and four inch crystals were not uncommon. It is common to see specimens of English barite labeled only Cumberland, England without a mine name, but this is very common for many mining districts of the world where most of the specimens are only given the name of the district rather than a particular mine name.
Cumbria, Appleby, Hilton Mine. “Clear but attractive iron stained flat prismatic crystals to 4 cm in groups. Occurs somewhat larger & very clear. Somewhat scarce.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Caldbeck Fells, Dry Gill. “White opaque tabular xl 5 + cm with classic mimetite (campylite) crystal balls. Scarce.1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Dufton. One crystal of Barite from Dufton weighed in at about 100 lbs. I am sure that is monster would have made a good door stop and been very impressive in a display for the general public or school children. “Large (10 cm) clear tabular xl. Also occurs prismatic and larger. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Cumbria, Egremont. Mines near Egremont also produced fine barite crystals.
Cumbria, Frizington, Parkside Mine. My particular favorites are the long slender translucent amber colored ones from the Parkside mine near Frizington. Some of them are doubly terminated and eight or ten inches long. The British Museum has one on display that has two long slender crystals flaring off the matrix that sort of hypnotized me. You know that you are looking at great mineral specimen when you wake up and realize that ten or fifteen minuets has passed without you knowing it. Frequently many of these and other Barites from the mines near Frizington are associated with tiny curved cream colored or tan dolomite crystals.
Cumbria, Frizington, Dalmellington Mine. Other fine somewhat prismatic Barites were found in the Dalmellington mine.
Cumbria, Frizington, Mowbray Mine. Perhaps most popular with collectors were the baby blue crystals, again on the ubiquitous tiny dolomite crystals from the Mowbray mine. These have always been considered drop dead classics and everyone wanted them in their collection. Also from Frizington and one of my favorites were the pinkish tan spear shaped crystals that had a white or cream colored zoning around the edges of the crystals.
Cumbria, Nenthead, Bromley Hill Mine. Specimens of barite after alstonite have been reported from the Bromley Hill mine.1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 24, 1993, p.394.

Derbyshire, Youlgreave, Arbor Low. Derbyshire is not known for fine crystals, but it did produce brown banded and stalactitic barite that you often see in old collections. These are often polished and look like a dark brown malachite often complete with “eyes”. “Brown, compact banded (“oakstone”) material was mined near the ancient stone circle at Arbor Low near Youlgreave…in the 19th century for ornamental purposed, and takes a high polish. This material was sometimes polished with ropes to dig hollows through the colored bands to give the effect of “eyes”. The exact locality was grassed over and lost for many years until rediscovered in recent times…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 14, 1983, p.23.

France
Saône-et Loire, Autun, Main-Reclesne Mine. “An interesting group of barite specimens were for sale in Al McGuinness’ room. The crystals from Le Man mine…were of a pleasing brownish yellow color and reached 10 cm (4 inches) in length…About half of the 35 specimens in the lot were cabinet size and the rest were large miniatures. Their pedigree was of note: personally collected by Pierre Bariand, curator of minerals at the Sorbonne (University of Paris).1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 194, 1978, p.194.

Gard Department, Saint Laurent le Minier, Les Malines Mine. “…has also recently produced large specimens of milky white barite rosettes, sometimes on botryoidal pyrite, covered with a thin film of sulfur, topped by clear tabular sulfur crystals to 7 cm.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
See if you can find out how much stuff was produced.

Gard Department, Saint Laurent le Ninier. “Eric (Asselborn) also found a quantity of snow-white barite in radial clusters to 5 cm, sometimes grouped in a fine-grained dolomitic rock from Saint Laurent le Niner.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 21, 1990, p.489.
Contact Eric and ask him about this find. Is this from Les Malines Mine above?

Indre, Chaillac. “Small (0.7) cm reddish-tinged blades in 11 cm masses group, Relatively common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
See if you can find out more about this loclaity.

Puy de Dôme Department, Chantelguyon, Ravin de Sans-Souci. “Tabular lozenge-shaped crystals of barite on a granite matrix were also found at Ravin de Sans-Souci…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
See if you can find out how much stuff was produced and how big the got and what color they were and how shiny and or transparent.

Puy de Dôme Department, Olliox Cote d’Abot. “Large partially gemmy barite crystals to 15 cm have recently been collected at Cote d’Abot… .”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 23, 1992, p.434.
You should be able to find out more about this locality.
Puy de Dôme Department, Four La Brouque. “Alan Carion…Paris, France had two new items of interest from France at the Tucson show:. Aragonite from Gergorie, and barite from Four La Brouque…the barite exists as sharp, very well formed, blocky, yellow-gray, single crystals up to about 8 cm.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 19, 1988, p.337.
Find out from Alan Carion how many of the specimens came from this locality.

Var Department, Esterel, Font Sante Mine. This mine is perhaps better known for its fluorite specimens which are often associated with barite, but fine barite specimens have also been found here. “Barite …is plentiful and very fine specimens have turned up, with white, cream or clear, colorless, curved blades up to 25 cm. Delicate “butterflies,” covered with drusy quartz rest attractively on the fluorite. Attractive rosaete forms also result, with vistas into the colored fluorite beneath. Pale, clear yellow blades contain parallel acicular inclusions which appear to be a sulfide.”1 Specimens at this mine were formerly more abundant before mechanized mining and on site acid treatment of the ore.
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p.309.

Germany
Harz Mountains, Clausthal. These bladed barite crystals are coated with goethite? are not much to look at but they are from a famous old locality.

Baden-Württemberg, Black Forest, Rankachtal, Oberwolfach, Grube Clara. This mine has produced pointed barite specimens for over a 100 years. Locally, barite is called meisselspat (chisel spar). These specimens are confined mostly to Germany because of the local interest. In this regard they are like the barite specimens from Palos Verde, near Los Angeles, California that are mostly of interest to local collectors. In the Mineral business you can indeed make money by taking coal to Newcastel, especially after Newcastle stopped producing coal. Grube Clara is the last mining operating in an old mining district. The earliest mining documents date from 1652. Since 1850 the mine has produced barite and even recently fine specimens have been found. The mine is also known for water clear fluorite crystals and fine but small secondary minerals (this means micromounts). …collectors are admitted to the dumps at the barite mill near Wolfach for a fee of about $1.1
1 Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p 306.

Sauerland, Dreislar. “Wright’s Rock Shop has acquired a new lot of very impressive, large (25-30 cm) groups of thick, pink and white, bladed barite crystals from Dreislar, Most are sprinkled with lustrous chalcopyrite disphenoids, and are exceptionally good for the locality.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 20, 1989. P. 398.
Ask Helmut Bruckner how much of this material there was and the nature of the crystals and a better locality.

Saxony, Erzgebirge, Obersachsen, Crottendorf, Pöhla Uranium Mine. “At the same dealer’s stand (Ben de Wit) were some large, spectacular groups of the new golden barite from the Pöhla uranium mine…The resemblance this time is to the well-known golden barites from the Eagle mine, Colorado. The crystals are bright, gemmy, deep orange tablets to 4 co on an edge in groups to 12 cm ($650), and also one 25 x 30-cm group ($1500).”1 “Only about 200 decent specimens have been found. …collected over the last 4 to 5 years. …Transparent yellow-brown crystals up to 12 cm were found initially, but more recent crystals are generally a lighter yellow dolor and smaller in size (up to 5 cm). Specimens range from miniature size to large cabinet size.”2 This last bit was apparently reported by Ben De Wit to Wendell Wilson at the Denver show in 1986. Many more specimens made their appearance at the Munich and Ste.-Marie-aux-Mines shows(Sotheby's 2001 auction of the Joseph Freilich collection)(Sotheby's 2001 auction of the Joseph Freilich collection) in 1988.
1. Mineralogical Record, Notes from Germany, Thomas Moore, Munich show 1986, Vol. 18, 1987, p.161. 1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 18, 1987, p.147.

Rheinland-Pfalz, Baumholder, Ruschberg, Clarashall Mine. “Clear parallel xls to 1.5 cm w / red tips and scattered tiny cinnabar xls. 4x5 cm. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
Find out more about this locality.

Greece
Attica Peninsula, Laurium. “Predominant gangue of the secondary ore zones of the Kamaréza and Plaka mines, occurring as white nodules, lamellar aggregates to 10 cm long and tabular crystals associated with P2 and K2 suites.”1 The mines are on the coast of the Aegean Sea about 25 miles south east of Athens. The Greeks began lead and silver mining there about 600 BC. And the workings were abandoned about 100 AD. A French mining company began mining zinc in the area in the middle of the 19th century. Thousands of mine shafts have been sunk in the region. The Plaka and Kamaréza mines are the names of the tow major mines worked by the French. An article on the mines and minerals but short on pictures of minerals from the locality is in the Mineralogical Record.2
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 7, 1976, p.123. 2. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 7, 1976, p.114-125.

Northern Greece. “…rectangulary shaped “window” crystals of red hematite edged clear barite up to 2 cm on matrix…”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 18, 1978, p.134.
You should really see if you can run down this locality.

Seriphos, Almiros, Koutalas and Aghia Trias. “Tabular, colorless and transparent crystals of barite showing a slightly curved habit have been found near the villages of Almiros, Koutalas and Aghia Trias.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Gilbert Gauthier & Nicholaos Albandakis, Vol. 22, 1991, p.304.
Ask Gilbert Gauthier about the barites from this locality and the Andradites. Nicholaos Albandakis’s address is given as 112 Iron Constandopoulou, 16346 Athens, Greece.

Italy
Sardinia, Cagliara, Silius. “Among the new items Herb Obodda had more than a hundred specimens of yellowish-white barite from Silius, near Cagliara…The crystals were lustrous, well formed, commonly on matrix and sometimes containing phantoms. The specimens were mostly small cabinet size and carried crystals to 8 cm.”
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 9, 1978, p.192.
Ask Herb how many of the specimens were collected and what kind of mine they came from and if there was a mine name.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Barega Mine. “The Barega mine, not far from Iglesias, is a famous for large, yellow barite crystals. Smaller barite crystals have been found in many outcrops on a small hill near Villamassargia.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Gianni Porcellini, Vol. 15, 1984, p.372.
The address of Gianni Porcellini is given as via Giarabub, 6, 47047 Rimini, Italy. See if you can find out how big the crystals and specimens get and what the production of this kind of specimen was.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Villa Margarosa Cave. “Golden, transparent, zoned tabular xls to 2 cm in group. Common.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.
See if you can find out more about this locality.

Sardinia, Iglesias, Mount Onixedou. “Clear prismatic xls to 3 cm matrix, 4.5x7cm. Scarce?”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

Sardinia. “Kristalle imported some very find specimens of blue barite crystals to several inches on large pieces of matrix from Sardinia. The crystals are moderately thin and stand up handsomely on the matrix. No small specimens were available but the cabinet pieces were superb.”1
1. Mineralogical Record, Vol. 8, 1977, p.282.
Ask Donna what the locality was and the dimensions, cost etc. How many specimens, what was the locality etc.

Japan
Speaking only of Japanese barites: “There are so many localities of beautiful and large crystals of barite that only a few will be mentioned here. Most of the fine crystals of barite occur in metal sulfide veins or Kuroko type deposits. Wide varieties of crystal habits have been reported. Commonly observed habits are platy, rhombic, six-sided or eight-sided forms, depending on the combination of faces. Prismatic crystals elongated parallel to a, b or c axes are also not rare. Very unusual is a habit resembling dodecahedral crystals of cubic system, consisting of well developed (110), (001), (011, (010) and several other faces. Crystals larger than 5 cm in diameter have been found from many localities, such as follows; Akaiwa, Shiribeshi Province Hokkaido; Yunosawa mine, Aomori Prefecture; Osarizawa mine, Akita Prefecture; Hassei mine, Akita Prefecture; Sado mine, Niigata Prefecture; Kusakura mine, Niigata Prefecture; Kuratani mine, Ishikawa Prefecture.”1 Japanese barites are not going to put the English barites out of business any time soon.
Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p..

Akita Prefecture, Tamagawa Hot Spring. The barite from this locality when first found was thought to be a new mineral because it contained some lead and was mildly radioactive. It was later found at Hokutō Hot springs in Taiwan and given the name hokutolite. This material was later found to be only a lead bearing barite and the name was discredited. “The mineral was designated as a special natural monument of the nation in 1952, and cannot be collected without the permission of the Government. …The plumbian barite is precipitated as pale yellow transparent crystals of rhombic platy habit of a few millimeters in diameter on the wall around the spout of hot springs or around the water fall near the mouth of hot springs. …Crystals thus precipitated form banded crustification consisting of short prismatic or fibrous crystals of yellowish brown and pale reddish brown in alternating zoning...The precipitation rate of crustification is estimated to be 7 mm/year.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.177-8.

Akita Prefecture, Osarizawa Mine. Crystals from this mine reach at least 6 cm. There is a picture of a good specimen about 17 cm across with tabular crystals up to about 6 cm pictured in the book Introduction to Japanese Minerals.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.178.
You really need more information about Japanese barites. Color, maximum crystal size, abundance etc. What kind of mines are the Osarizawa and Sado mines?

Niigata Prefecture, Sado Mine. Flat spear shaped crystals from this mine reach at least 12 cm. A good specimen is pictured in the Introduction of Japanese Minerals.1
1 Introduction to Japanese Minerals, Geological Survey of Japan, 1976, p.177.

Kazakhstan
Dzhezkazgan. “Flesh colored opaque thin blades to 2 cm in 4 cm spray w/ quartz, calcite & chalcopyrite. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

Kyrgyzstan, Osh Oblast, Kadamzhay. “Attractive clear yellowish tabular 5 cm blade w / small stibnite blades piercing it. Rare.”1
1 Bill Dameron, personal communication, 2003, description of a specimen in his collection.

.

I had to cut off what I have written about barite here at Mexico because it was too long for the thread entry, but you get the idea, and I can post the rest of the information later in other threads if it is needed.

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 10:02PM
    
Maybe this will useful:

In 2007 year in Madan, in Zlotograd mine, there was a find of big pocket of tabular barite crystals on quartz. Crystals of barite were white, partly transparent, up to 6-7 cm, thick up to 1,5 cm, with high lustre, very often with well developed phantoms. From this zone were collected thousands of specimens but only few tens were really good quality.

Stanisławów, Poland - [www.mindat.org]
This very famous locality is Poland is just up today very "unknown" in foreign countries.
Stanisławów was a barite and fluorite mine, exploiting barite-fluorite hydrotermal vein. Barite crystals in this locality were incredibly water-clear with unusual lustre, usually on very contrastive matrix of psilomelan. Crystals were tabular, usually up to 2-3 cm, but sometimes reach 5 c and more, tabular, not very thick. During most productive times they were collected very unprofessionally and for this reason majority of specimens is damaged today, but there are also preserved some world-class specimens. Today mine is flooded, and even on dumps it is impossible to find any specimens.

Tom

-------------------------------------
"Spirifer" Geological Society
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 10:18PM
    
Rock !

Suggested additions:

Norway, Telemark, Bamble, Herre, Styggedalsgangen.

This is probably one of the best Scandinavian localities for baryte. It is located in the Tråk mining district in Bamble very close to the border of the Permian rift valley of the Oslo-region and the mineralizations is probably genetically linked to this. The crystals occur in a vein system with quartz and many different habits have been observed. Prismatic to tabular, golden yellow crystals to 15 cm are the most common, but blue and colourless crystals also occur. The best specimens can rival classic barytes from the famous localities in the UK and elsewhere.

You may find some pictures of baryte crystals from this locality in my gallery. There are other localities for crystallized baryte in Norway, but this locality is by far the best and the one that has produced the largest number of specimens.

I would also like to focus your attention on the barytes from the Kalhari Mn-mines in S-Africa. You will i.e. see a very good specimen with large, zoned baryte crystals from the N`Chwaning II mine in my gallery.

Knut



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/25/2009 06:59AM by Knut Eldjarn.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 24, 2009 10:46PM
    
Barite crystal 83 x 25.5 x 14.5 cm and weighing 76.5 kg. from Elandsrand gold mine, South Africa (July 1997, specimens at mine office). (Cairncross & Rademeyer 2001)

Cairncross, B. and B. Rademeyer (2001) Large barite crystals from the Elsrand gold mine, South Africa. Mineralogical Record 32:177-180.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 26, 2009 04:00PM
    
With regards to the spelling, I find it interesting to note that two recent and important publications on British Mineralogy - Minerals of Northern England by Symes and Young, and Minerals of Britain and Ireland by Tindle - both use the spelling "barite." Insidious Americanizations are creeping in everywhere! How long can it be until our British friends are wanting to drive on the right side of the road?
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 26, 2009 04:47PM
    
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England, Cumbria, West Cumbrian (Cumberland) Iron Orefield


© 2007, Jesse Fisher

A well-formed pale greenish yellow barite crystal, 4.2 cm long, perched on a chunk of earthy red hematite matrix. The matrix is covered with numerous small hexagonal calcite crystals. 6x6x4.5 cm overall size.

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The hematite deposits of the West Cumbrian Iron Orefield have produced some of the finest barite specimens found in the UK. Well-formed blade-like crystals in various shades of blue, pale green and yellow, often partially stained red by hematite have come from the numerous mines that have worked the deposits. Crystals over 10 cm in length are not uncommon. Common associate minerals include earthy hematite, dolomite and calcite.

The orefield forms a narrow northeast-trending belt encompassing the villages of Egremont, Cleator Moor and Frizington. Iron mining in the area is recorded as early as the 12th century, and reached it's peak during the latter half of the 19th century. All but a few mines had closed by the time of the First World War, and the last surviving mine in the district, the Florence Mine, finally closed in 2007. Symes and Young (2008) list a total of 54 mines that have worked these ores.

During the height of mining activities, the orefield was a very prolific producer of specimens, both barite and the well-known calcites from this district. Mines known to have produced excellent barite specimens include the Mobray, Parkside, Goose Green, Dalmellington, Crowgarth, and others. Unfortunately, the specimens from many of the mines were quite similar in appearance, and without documentation it is difficult, if not impossible to say which individual mine a specimen may have come from. Most, if not all of these once prolific mines are now inaccessible and the sites of many have been completely cleared and reclaimed.


United Kingdom
England, North Pennine Orefield


© 2008 Jesse Fisher

A hedgehog-like cluster of sharp, white barite crystals up to 1.5 cm long. 13 cm across. Recovered in the mid 1970s from the Murton Fell North Vein, accessed by Wilson's Level, Hilton Mine.

Barite is a common non-metallic component of the ores found in the North Pennine Mountains, and has been recovered commercially from several mines. The distribution of ore minerals in the Orefield is highly concentric, with a fluorite zone centered on Weardale in County Durham and spilling over to the Alston Moor area of Cumbria and the East Allendale area of Northumberland. Outside this central zone, barite (and sometimes witherite) replace fluorite as the primary non-metallic ore mineral in the deposits. Barite from the North Pennines, when present in well-formed specimens tends to form sheafs of white/colorless bladed crystals, usually opaque but sometimes semi-transparent. While some are attractive, they do not compare in quality to the specimens from the West Cumbrian Orefield, mentioned above.

Along the Escarpment, which forms the western margin of the North Pennines Orefield, a number of mines have been worked commercially for barite and have yielded specimens. These include the Hilton and Murton Mines in Scordale, and further north, the Dufton Fell and Silverband Mines.

In the Nenthead region of Alston Moor, the Nentsberry Haggs Mine is known for both barite specimens and interesting (if not lovely) pseudomorphs of barite after witherite.

Barite specimens have also come from the Cow Green Mine in Teesdale, Co. Durham (now under a reservoir), The Wet Grooves Mine on Wensleydale, North Yorkshire, and the Settlingstones Mine near Hexham, Northumberland.

None of the above mentioned mines are currently active and few, if any, are accessible.


References:

Fisher, J., 2009, The Hilton Mine, Scordlae, Cumbria, England, Rocks & Minerals, v. 85, n. 2, pp. 114-121.

Tindle, A., G., 2008, Minerals of Britain and Ireland, Terra Publishing, Harpenden, England, 616 p.

Symes, R., F., and Young, B., 2008, Minerals of Northern England, NMS Enterprises, Ltd., Edinburgh, 208 p.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 03/27/2009 03:44PM by Jesse Fisher.
avatar Re: Best Minerals - Baryte
March 26, 2009 09:26PM
Jesse,
Are you volunteering to work on British barites? barytes?. See what a difference a few pictures make with all that drab looking text?

Rock Currier
Crystals not pistols.
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