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Descloizite

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Alfred Des Cloizeaux
Formula:
PbZn(VO4)(OH)
System:
Orthorhombic
Colour:
Brownish red, ...
Hardness:
3 - 3½
Name:
Named in 1854 by Augustin Alexis Damour in honor of Alfred Lewis Oliver Legrand Des Cloizeaux [October 17, 1817 Beauvais, Oise, France - May 6, 1897 Paris, France], Professor of Mineralogy, University of Paris, who first described the mineral.
Adelite-Descloizite Group. Descloizite-Mottramite Series. The zinc analogue of Mottramite, vanadate analogue of Arsendescloizite.

A secondary mineral often found in the oxidation zones of base metal deposits.

Crystal structure details (Effenberger, 2002; Qurashi and Barnes, 1964): M2 site is Zn; in opposition to adelite, there are no (M2)O6 octahedra, but ZnO4(OH)2 dipyramids, the difference being due to Jahn-Teller distortion; the dipyramids share edges to form chains; the chains are parallel to [001]; two chains are linked via a tetrahedron to form 3D framework; in the framework there are cavities where the M1 site (here: Pb) is located; Pb forms PbO7(OH) square antiprism.

Classification of Descloizite

Approved, 'Grandfathered' (first described prior to 1959)
8.BH.40

8 : PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, VANADATES
B : Phosphates, etc., with additional anions, without H2O
H : With medium-sized and large cations, (OH,etc.):RO4 = 1:1
41.5.2.1

41 : ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
5 : (AB)2(XO4)Zq
21.3.10

21 : Vanadates (and vanadates with arsenate or phosphate)
3 : Vanadates of Al, rare earths, Pb, V or Bi
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Type Occurrence of Descloizite

Geological Setting of Type Material:
Pb, Zn, U, and V deposit.

Occurrences of Descloizite

Geological Setting:
Secondary mineral in oxidized zone of vanadium bearing base metal deposits.

Physical Properties of Descloizite

Sub-Vitreous, Resinous, Waxy, Greasy
Diaphaneity (Transparency):
Transparent, Translucent
Colour:
Brownish red, red-orange, reddish brown to blackish brown, nearly black
Comment:
Crystals often exhibit zonal growth with varying colours.
Streak:
Orange to brownish red
Hardness (Mohs):
3 - 3½
Comment:
Somewhat harder on external crystal faces.
Tenacity:
Brittle
Cleavage:
None Observed
Fracture:
Irregular/Uneven, Sub-Conchoidal
Density:
6.2 g/cm3 (Measured)    6.202 g/cm3 (Calculated)

Crystallography of Descloizite

Crystal System:
Orthorhombic
Class (H-M):
mmm (2/m 2/m 2/m) - Dipyramidal
Space Group:
Pnma
Cell Parameters:
a = 7.593Å, b = 6.057Å, c = 9.416Å
Ratio:
a:b:c = 1.254 : 1 : 1.555
Unit Cell Volume:
V 433.05 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Z:
4
Morphology:
Crystals equant to pyramidal {111}, prismatic [001], rarely tabular {100} or short prismatic [100]. Crystal faces are commonly uneven or rough, with frequent sub-parallel growth. Drusy crusts of intergrown crystals common; also stalactitic or massive with a coarse fibrous structure and mammillary or botryoidal surface. Massive granular at times, compact to friable.
Comment:
Pnam

Crystallographic forms of Descloizite

Crystal Atlas:
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Descloizite no.19 - Goldschmidt (1913-1926)
Descloizite no.24 - Goldschmidt (1913-1926)
3d models and HTML5 code kindly provided by www.smorf.nl.

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Edge Lines | Miller Indicies | Axes

Transparency
Opaque | Translucent | Transparent

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Along a-axis | Along b-axis | Along c-axis | Start rotation | Stop rotation
X-Ray Powder Diffraction:
Image Loading

Radiation - Copper Kα
Data Set:
Data courtesy of RRUFF project at University of Arizona, used with permission.
X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data:
d-spacingIntensity
5.12 (80)
4.25 (60)
3.23 (100)
2.90 (80)
2.69 (80)
2.62 (80)
2.30 (80)
1.652 (80)
Comments:
ICDD 12-537; See also 41-1369.

Optical Data of Descloizite

Type:
Biaxial (-)
RI values:
nα = 2.185 nβ = 2.265 nγ = 2.350
2V:
Measured: 85° to 90°, Calculated: 88°
Birefringence:
0.165
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.165
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness) and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Very High
Dispersion:
strong r > v rarely r < v
Optical Extinction:
XYZ = cba
Pleochroism:
Visible
Comments:
Weak to strong:
X = Y = Canary yellow to greenish yellow
Z = Brownish yellow

Chemical Properties of Descloizite

Formula:
PbZn(VO4)(OH)
All elements listed in formula:
Common Impurities:
Cu

Relationship of Descloizite to other Species

Series:
Forms a series with Mottramite (see here)
Other Members of Group:
AdeliteCaMg(AsO4)(OH)
ArsendescloizitePbZn(AsO4)(OH)
AustiniteCaZn(AsO4)(OH)
ČechitePbFe2+(VO4)(OH)
CobaltaustiniteCaCo(AsO4)(OH)
ConichalciteCaCu(AsO4)(OH)
DuftitePbCu(AsO4)(OH)
GabrielsonitePbFe(AsO4)(OH)
GottlobiteCaMg(VO4,AsO4)(OH)
HermannroseiteCaCu(PO4)(OH)
MottramitePbCu(VO4)(OH)
NickelaustiniteCaNi(AsO4)(OH)
PyrobelonitePbMn2+(VO4)(OH)
TangeiteCaCu(VO4)(OH)
VuagnatiteCaAl(SiO4)(OH)
8.BH.05ThadeuiteCa(Mg,Fe2+)3(PO4)2(OH,F)2
8.BH.10DurangiteNaAl(AsO4)F
8.BH.10IsokiteCaMg(PO4)F
8.BH.10LacroixiteNaAl(PO4)F
8.BH.10MaxwelliteNaFe3+(AsO4)F
8.BH.10PanasqueiraiteCaMg(PO4)(OH,F)
8.BH.10TilasiteCaMg(AsO4)F
8.BH.15DrugmanitePb2(Fe3+,Al)(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)2
8.BH.20Bjarebyite(Ba,Sr)(Mn2+,Fe2+,Mg)2Al2(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BH.20CirroliteCa3Al2(PO4)3(OH)3 (?)
8.BH.20KulaniteBa(Fe2+,Mn2+,Mg)2(Al,Fe3+)2(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BH.20PenikisiteBa(Mg,Fe2+,Ca)2Al2(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BH.20PerloffiteBa(Mn2+,Fe2+)2Fe23+(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BH.20JohntomaiteBaFe22+Fe23+(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BH.25Bertossaite(Li,Na)2(Ca,Fe2+,Mn2+)Al4(PO4)4(OH,F)4
8.BH.25Palermoite(Li,Na)2(Sr,Ca)Al4(PO4)4(OH)4
8.BH.30CarminitePbFe23+(AsO4)2(OH)2
8.BH.30SewarditeCaFe23+(AsO4)2(OH)2
8.BH.35AdeliteCaMg(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35ArsendescloizitePbZn(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35AustiniteCaZn(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35CobaltaustiniteCaCo(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35ConichalciteCaCu(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35DuftitePbCu(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35GabrielsonitePbFe(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35NickelaustiniteCaNi(AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35TangeiteCaCu(VO4)(OH)
8.BH.35GottlobiteCaMg(VO4,AsO4)(OH)
8.BH.35HermannroseiteCaCu(PO4)(OH)
8.BH.40ČechitePbFe2+(VO4)(OH)
8.BH.40MottramitePbCu(VO4)(OH)
8.BH.40PyrobelonitePbMn2+(VO4)(OH)
8.BH.45BayldonitePbCu3(AsO4)2(OH)2
8.BH.45VésigniéiteBaCu3(VO4)2(OH)2
8.BH.50PaganoiteNiBi(AsO4)O
8.BH.55JagoweriteBaAl2(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BH.60Attakolite(Ca,Sr)Mn(Al,Fe)4(HPO4,PO4)3(SiO4,PO4)(OH)4
8.BH.65LeningraditePbCu3(VO4)2Cl
21.3.1SteigeriteAl(VO4) · 3H2O
21.3.2Alvanite(Zn,Ni)Al4(V5+O3)2(OH)12 · 2H2O
21.3.3MetaschoderiteAl2(PO4)(VO4) · 6H2O
21.3.4SchoderiteAl2(PO4)(VO4) · 8H2O
21.3.5SatpaeviteAl12V24+V65+O37 · 30H2O
21.3.6VanaliteNaAl8V10O38 · 30H2O
21.3.7Wakefieldite-(Ce)Ce(VO4)
21.3.7Wakefieldite-(Y)Y(VO4)
21.3.8ChervetitePb2(V2O7)
21.3.9MottramitePbCu(VO4)(OH)
21.3.11ClinobisvaniteBi(VO4)
21.3.11DreyeriteBi(VO4)
21.3.11PucheriteBi(VO4)
21.3.12SchumacheriteBi3(VO4)2O(OH)
21.3.13NamibiteCu(BiO)2(VO4)(OH)
21.3.14Pottsite(Pb3xBi4-2x)(VO4)4·H2O (0.8 < x < 1.0)
21.3.15Duhamelite(Pb,Bi,Ca)Cu(VO4)(OH,O)

Other Names for Descloizite

Other Information

Other Information:
Readily soluble in acids.
Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.
Industrial Uses:
Rarely an ore of vanadium.

References for Descloizite

Reference List:
Bergemann (1850) Annalen der Physik, Halle, Leipzig: 80: 393 (as Dechenite - arsenatian variety).

von Kobell (1850) Journal für praktische Chemie, Leipzig: 50: 496 (as Aræoxene).

Damour (1854) Annales de chimie et de physique, Paris: 41: 72, 78.

Fischer and Nessler (1854) Ber. Verh. Nat. Ges. Freiburg: 1: 33 (as Eusynchite).

Tschermak (1861) Konigliche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Ber.: 44[2]: 157.

Schrauf (1862) Annalen der Physik, Halle, Leipzig: 116: 355.

Zippe (1861) Konigliche Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna, Ber.: 44[1]: 197 (as Rhombischer Vanadit).

Frenzel (1880) Mineralogische und petrographische Mitteilungen, Vienna: 3: 506 (as Tritochorit).

Frenzel (1881) Mineralogische und petrographische Mitteilungen, Vienna: 4: 97 (as Tritochorit).

Vigener (1884) Berichte Niederrheinische Gesellschaft für Natur und Heilkunde, Bonn: 87 (as Schaffnerit).

Headden (1903) Proceedings of the Colorado Science Society: 7: 141.

Fresenius analysis in: Guild (1911) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 49: 322.

Goldschmidt, V. (1916) Atlas der Krystallformen. 9 volumes, atlas, and text: vol. 3: 32.

Larsen, E.S. (1921) The Microscopic Determination of the Nonopaque Minerals, First edition, USGS Bulletin 679: 67, 64.

Diefenbach (1930) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 74: 155.

Strunz (1930) Naturwissenschaften: 27: 423.

Dittler and Hueber (1931) Mineralogische und petrographische Mitteilungen, Vienna: 41: 173.

Hintze, Carl (1931) Handbuch der Mineralogie. Berlin and Leipzig. 6 volumes: 1 [4A]: 666.

Bannister (1933) Mineralogical Magazine: 23: 376.

Meixner (1937) Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paleontologie, Heidelberg, Stuttgart: I: 79.

Hägele (1939) Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Geologie und Paleontologie, Heidelberg, Stuttgart, Beil.-Bd.: 75: 101.

Strunz (1939) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 101: 496.

Schwellnus (1946) Transactions of the Geological Society of South Africa: 48: 49.

Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 811-815.

Acta Crystallographica: B35: 717-720.

Qurashi, M.M. and Barnes, W.H. (1964): The structures of the minerals of the descloizite and adelite groups: V—descloizite and conichalcite (part 3). The structure of descloizite. The Canadian Mineralogist: 8: 23-39.

Canadian Mineralogist (1970): 8: 23-39.

Anthony, J.W., Bideaux, R.A., Bladh, K.W., and Nichols, M.C. (2000) Handbook of Mineralogy, Volume IV. Arsenates, Phosphates, Vanadates. Mineral Data Publishing, Tucson, AZ, 680pp.: 138.

Effenberger, H. (2002): New investigations of the adelite-descloizite group, 18th General Meeting of the International Mineralogical Association, Edinburgh, UK: 18: 134-142.

Đorđević, T., Kolitsch, U., Nasadala, L. (2016): A single-crystal X-ray and Raman spectroscopic study of hydrothermally synthesized arsenates and vanadates with the descloizite and adelite structure types. Am. Mineral. 101, 1135-1149.

Internet Links for Descloizite

Specimens:
The following Descloizite specimens are currently listed for sale on minfind.com.

Localities for Descloizite

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