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Triplite

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Formula:
(Mn2+,Fe2+)2(PO4)(F,OH)
System:
Monoclinic
Colour:
Brown, red-brown, dark ...
Hardness:
5 - 5½
Member of:
Name:
From the Greek τριπλόος, "triplos", three-fold, alluding to its three prominent cleavages.

Classification of Triplite

Approved
8.BB.10

8 : PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, VANADATES
B : Phosphates, etc., with additional anions, without H2O
B : With only medium-sized cations, (OH, etc.):RO4 about 1:1
41.6.1.2

41 : ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
6 : A2(XO4)Zq
22.1.23

22 : Phosphates, Arsenates or Vanadates with other Anions
1 : Phosphates, arsenates or vanadates with fluoride
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Type Occurrence of Triplite

Year of Discovery:
1813

Occurrences of Triplite

Geological Setting:
Granitic pegmatites of the complex, phosphate-rich type. Also occurs in high temperature vein (Nevada).

Physical Properties of Triplite

Vitreous, Resinous
Diaphaneity (Transparency):
Opaque
Colour:
Brown, red-brown, dark brown, black (altered); light brownish u=yellow to dark reddish brown in transmitted light.
Streak:
White to brown
Hardness (Mohs):
5 - 5½
Cleavage:
Distinct/Good
On {001}, good; on {010}, fair; and on {100}, poor.
Fracture:
Irregular/Uneven, Sub-Conchoidal
Density:
3.5 - 3.9 g/cm3 (Measured)    3.94 g/cm3 (Calculated)

Crystallography of Triplite

Crystal System:
Monoclinic
Class (H-M):
2/m - Prismatic
Cell Parameters:
a = 11.97Å, b = 6.52Å, c = 10.09Å
β = 105.62°
Ratio:
a:b:c = 1.836 : 1 : 1.548
Unit Cell Volume:
V 758.39 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Morphology:
Crystals commonly crude and incompletely developed. Usually massive.
X-Ray Powder Diffraction:
Image Loading

Radiation - Copper Kα
Data Set:
Data courtesy of RRUFF project at University of Arizona, used with permission.

Optical Data of Triplite

Type:
Biaxial (+)
RI values:
nα = 1.650 nβ = 1.660 nγ = 1.680
2V:
Measured: 70° to 90°, Calculated: 72°
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.030
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness) and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Moderate
Dispersion:
relatively strong
Pleochroism:
Visible
Comments:
Usually distinct in shades of yellow-brown or reddish brown.

Chemical Properties of Triplite

Formula:
(Mn2+,Fe2+)2(PO4)(F,OH)
Idealised Formula:
Mn22+(PO4)F
Essential elements:
All elements listed in formula:
Common Impurities:
Sc

Relationship of Triplite to other Species

Series:
Forms a series with Zwieselite (see here)
Member of:
Other Members of Group:
Triploidite(Mn2+,Fe2+)2(PO4)(OH)
Wolfeite(Fe2+,Mn2+)2(PO4)(OH)
Zwieselite(Fe2+,Mn2+)2(PO4)F
8.BB.05AmblygoniteLiAl(PO4)F
8.BB.05MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.05TavoriteLiFe3+(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.10Zwieselite(Fe2+,Mn2+)2(PO4)F
8.BB.15SarkiniteMn22+(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.15Triploidite(Mn2+,Fe2+)2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.15Wagnerite(Mg,Fe2+)2(PO4)F
8.BB.15Wolfeite(Fe2+,Mn2+)2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.15Stanĕkite(Mn2+,Fe2+,Mg)Fe3+(PO4)O
8.BB.15JoosteiteMn2+(Mn3+,Fe3+)(PO4)O
8.BB.15HydroxylwagneriteMg2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.20HoltedahliteMg2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.20Satterlyite(Fe2+,Mg,Fe3+)2(PO4)(OH,O)
8.BB.25AlthausiteMg4(PO4)2(OH,O)(F,☐)
8.BB.30AdamiteZn2(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.30EveiteMn22+(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.30LibetheniteCu2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.30OliveniteCu2(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.30ZincolibetheniteCuZn(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.30ZincoliveniteCuZn(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.30AuriacusiteFe3+Cu2+(AsO4)O
8.BB.35ParadamiteZn2(AsO4)(OH)
8.BB.35TarbuttiteZn2(PO4)(OH)
8.BB.40BarbosaliteFe2+Fe23+(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.40HentscheliteCuFe23+(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.40Lazulite(Mg,Fe2+)Al2(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.40ScorzaliteFe2+Al2(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.40WilhelmkleiniteZnFe23+(AsO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.45TrolleiteAl4(PO4)3(OH)3
8.BB.50NamibiteCu(BiO)2(VO4)(OH)
8.BB.55Phosphoellenbergerite(Mg,◻)2Mg12(PO4,PO3OH)6(PO3OH,CO3)2(OH)6
8.BB.60UrusoviteCuAl(AsO4)O
8.BB.65TheoparacelsiteCu3(As2O7)(OH)2
8.BB.70TuraniteCu5(VO4)2(OH)4
8.BB.75StoiberiteCu5(VO4)2O2
8.BB.80FingeriteCu11(VO4)6O2
8.BB.85AverieviteCu6(VO4)2O2Cl2
8.BB.90LipscombiteFe2+Fe23+(PO4)2(OH)2
8.BB.90RichelliteCaFe23+(PO4)2(OH,F)2
8.BB.90ZinclipscombiteZnFe23+(PO4)2(OH)2
22.1.1AmblygoniteLiAl(PO4)F
22.1.2LacroixiteNaAl(PO4)F
22.1.3NatrophosphateNa7(PO4)2F · 19H2O
22.1.5NacaphiteNa2Ca(PO4)F
22.1.6ArctiteNa2Ca4(PO4)3F
22.1.7NefedoviteNa5Ca4(PO4)4F
22.1.9FluorapatiteCa2Ca3(PO4)3F
22.1.10HerderiteCaBePO4(F,OH)
22.1.11IsokiteCaMg(PO4)F
22.1.12PanasqueiraiteCaMg(PO4)(OH,F)
22.1.13BabefphiteBaBePO4(F,OH)
22.1.14FluelliteAl2(PO4)F2(OH) · 7H2O
22.1.15MinyuliteKAl2(PO4)2(OH,F) · 4H2O
22.1.16MoriniteNaCa2Al2(PO4)2(OH)F4 · 2H2O
22.1.17BøggilditeNa2Sr2Al2PO4F9
22.1.18FluorstrophiteSrCaSr3(PO4)3F
22.1.19ViitaniemiiteNa(Ca,Mn2+)Al(PO4)(F,OH)3
22.1.20VäyryneniteMn2+Be(PO4)(OH,F)
22.1.21MaxwelliteNaFe3+(AsO4)F
22.1.22Wagnerite(Mg,Fe2+)2(PO4)F
22.1.24Magniotriplite(Mg,Fe2+,Mn2+)2PO4F
22.1.25Zwieselite(Fe2+,Mn2+)2(PO4)F
22.1.26McauslaniteFe3Al2(PO4)3(PO3OH)F · 18H2O
22.1.27RichelliteCaFe23+(PO4)2(OH,F)2
22.1.28SvabiteCa5(AsO4)3F
22.1.29TilasiteCaMg(AsO4)F
22.1.30Johnbaumite-MCa5(AsO4)3OH
22.1.31DurangiteNaAl(AsO4)F

Other Names for Triplite

Other Information

Other Information:
Soluble in acids.
Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for Triplite

Reference List:
Vauquelin (1802) Journal des mines {superseded by Annales des mines}: 11: 295 (as Phosphate natif de fer melangé de manganèse).

Vauquelin (1802) Annales de chimie, Paris: 41: 242m (as Phosphate natif de fer melangé de manganèse).

Lucas, J.A.H. (1806) Tableau métodique des espèces mineéraux. Part 1: 169 (as Manganèse phosphaté).

Werner (1808) (as Eisenpecherz).

Haüy, R.J. (1809) Tableau comparative des résultants de la cristallographie et de l’analyse chimique relativement à la classification des minéraux. Paris (as Manganèse phosphaté ferrifère).

Hausmann, J.F.L. (1813) Handbuch der Mineralogie, 1st. edition, 3 volumes, Göttingen: 3: 1079 (as Triplit).

Fuchs (1839) Journal für praktische Chemie, Leipzig: 18: 499 (as Eisenapatit).

Deville and Caron (1858) Comptes rendu de l’Académie des sciences de Paris: 47: 985.

Deville and Caron (1863) Annales de chimie et de physique, Paris: 67: 454.

Des Cloizeaux, A. (1867) Nouvelles recherches sur les propriétés optique des cristaux, naturels ou artificiels, et sur les variations que ces propriétés éprouvent sous l’influence de la chaleur. 222pp., Paris. (Institut imperial de France, Mémoires 18): 180.

Igelström, L.J. (1882) Ak. Stockholm, Öfv.: 39: 86 (as Talktriplit).

Kovár and Slavík (1900) Verh. Geol. Reichsansty. Wien: 50: 347.

Lacroix, A. (1910) Minéralogie de la France et des ses colonies, Paris. 5 volumes: vol. 4: 431.

Hess and Hunt (1913) American Journal of Science 36: 51.

Laubmann and Steinmetz (1920) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 55: 523, 559.

Shannon (1920) Proceedings of the U.S. National Museum: 58: 444.

Sellner (1924) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 59: 504.

Müllbauer (1925) Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leipzig: 61: 318.

Hintze, Carl (1931) Handbuch der Mineralogie. Berlin and Leipzig. 6 volumes: 1 [4A]: 700.

Henderson (1933) American Mineralogist: 18: 104.

Otto (1935) Mineralogische und petrographische Mitteilungen, Vienna: 47: 98.

Hurlbut (1936) American Mineralogist: 21: 656.

Pehrman (1939) Acta Ac. Aboensis, Math. Physica: 12, no. 6.

Richmond (1940) American Mineralogist: 25: 468.

Mason (1941) Geologiska Föeningens I Stockholm. Förhandlinger, Stockholm: 63: 285.

Mason (1942) Geologiska Föeningens I Stockholm. Förhandlinger, Stockholm: 64: 335.

Wolfe and Heinrich (1947) American Mineralogist: 32: 518.

Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 849-852.

American Mineralogist (1951): 36: 256-271.

Zeitschrift für Kristallographie (1969): 130: 1-14.

Armbruster, T.; Chopin, C.; Grew, E. S.; Baronnet, A. (2008): The triplite-wagnerite group: A modulated series. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, Volume 72, Issue 12, p. A32.

Vignola, P., Gatta, G. D., Hatert, F., Guastoni, A., Bersani, D. (2014): On the crystal-chemistry of a near-endmember triplite, Mn2+2(PO4)F, from the Codera valley (Sondrio Province, Central Alps, Italy). The Canadian Mineralogist 52, 235-245.

Internet Links for Triplite

Specimens:
The following Triplite specimens are currently listed for sale on minfind.com.

Localities for Triplite

map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.
Mineral and/or Locality  
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