Help mindat.org|Log In|Register|
Home PageMindat NewsThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusManagement TeamContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatSponsor a PageSponsored PagesTop Available PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on MindatThe Mindat Store
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryRandom MineralSearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportAdd Glossary Item
StatisticsMember ListBooks & MagazinesMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryHow to Link to MindatDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day Gallery

Beudantite

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
François Sulpice Beudant
Formula:
PbFe3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
System:
Trigonal
Colour:
Black, dark green, ...
Lustre:
Vitreous, Sub-Vitreous, Resinous, Greasy
Hardness:
3½ - 4½
Name:
Named by Armand Levy in 1826 in honor of François Sulpice Beudant [September 5, 1787 Paris, France – December 10, 1850 Paris, France], systematic Mineralogist, University of Paris, Paris, France. Beudant introduced many new mineral names in his books that have superseded older names.
The arsenate analogue of corkite with which a complete solid-solution range exists. Also forms a solid solution with segnitite and plumbojarosite from which it is difficult to distinguish.

A secondary mineral occurring in the oxidized zones of polymetallic deposits. It shows a large variety of different habits (tabular, acute rhombohedral, pseudo-cubic, pseudo-cuboctahedral, very rarely also acicular).
Some beudantite (and segnitite) may contain minor Sb replacing Fe.

Classification of Beudantite

Approved
8.BL.05

8 : PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, VANADATES
B : Phosphates, etc., with additional anions, without H2O
L : With medium-sized and large cations, (OH, etc.):RO4 = 3:1
43.4.1.1

43 : COMPOUND PHOSPHATES, ETC.
4 : Anhydrous Compound Phosphates, etc·, Containing Hydroxyl or Halogen
22.3.24

22 : Phosphates, Arsenates or Vanadates with other Anions
3 : Phosphates, arsenates or vanadates with sulphates
mindat.org URL:
http://www.mindat.org/min-652.html
Please feel free to link to this page.

Type Occurrence of Beudantite

Year of Discovery:
1826
Geological Setting of Type Material:
Oxidized zone of a polymetallic ore deposit.

Occurrences of Beudantite

Geological Setting:
Secondary mineral in oxidation zone of polymetallic deposits.

Physical Properties of Beudantite

Vitreous, Sub-Vitreous, Resinous, Greasy
Diaphaneity (Transparency):
Transparent, Translucent
Comment:
May be frosted.
Colour:
Black, dark green, brown, dark yellow, red, greenish yellow, brown
Streak:
Grayish yellow to green
Hardness (Mohs):
3½ - 4½
Tenacity:
Brittle
Cleavage:
Distinct/Good
Good on {0001}
Density:
4.48(2) g/cm3 (Measured)    4.49 g/cm3 (Calculated)

Crystallography of Beudantite

Crystal System:
Trigonal
Class (H-M):
3m (3 2/m) - Hexagonal Scalenohedral
Space Group:
R3m
Space Group Setting:
R3m
Cell Parameters:
a = 7.32Å, c = 17.02Å
Ratio:
a:c = 1 : 2.325
Unit Cell Volume:
V 789.79 ų (Calculated from Unit Cell)
Z:
3
Morphology:
Pseudo-cubic. Crystals tabular, pseudo-cubes, pseudo-cuboctahedra or pseudo-octahedra; very rarely also acicular. Microcrystalline massive.

Crystallographic forms of Beudantite

Crystal Atlas:
Image Loading
Click on an icon to view
Beudantite no.1 - Goldschmidt (1913-1926)
Beudantite no.2 - Goldschmidt (1913-1926)
Beudantite no.4 - Goldschmidt (1913-1926)
3d models and HTML5 code kindly provided by www.smorf.nl.

Toggle
Edge Lines | Miller Indicies | Axes

Transparency
Opaque | Translucent | Transparent

View
Along a-axis | Along b-axis | Along c-axis | Start rotation | Stop rotation
X-Ray Powder Diffraction Data:
d-spacingIntensity
5.725 (50)
5.089 (45)
3.108 (50)
3.078 (100)
2.865 (80)
2.290 (70)
1.979 (35)
Comments:
Also ICDD 19-689 (somewhat different)

Optical Data of Beudantite

Type:
Uniaxial (-)
RI values:
nω = 1.957 nε = 1.943
Birefringence:
0.014
Max Birefringence:
δ = 0.014
Image shows birefringence interference colour range (at 30µm thickness) and does not take into account mineral colouration.
Surface Relief:
Very High
Pleochroism:
Visible
Comments:
O = Yellow to red-brown
E = Colourless to yellow
Comments:
Anomalously biaxial, exhibiting sectoring. Crystals may exhibit three biaxial sectors around an uniaxial core (Laurion).

Chemical Properties of Beudantite

Formula:
PbFe3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
Essential elements:
All elements listed in formula:
Common Impurities:
Al,P

Relationship of Beudantite to other Species

Series:
Forms a series with Segnitite (see here)
Other Members of Group:
CorkitePbFe3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
GallobeudantitePbGa3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
HidalgoitePbAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
HinsdalitePbAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
KemmlitziteSrAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
SvanbergiteSrAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
WeileriteBaAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
WoodhouseiteCaAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05CorkitePbFe3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05HidalgoitePbAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05HinsdalitePbAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05KemmlitziteSrAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05SvanbergiteSrAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05WoodhouseiteCaAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.05GallobeudantitePbGa3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
8.BL.10ArsenogoyaziteSrAl3(AsO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10ArsenogorceixiteBaAl3(AsO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10ArsenocrandalliteCaAl3(AsO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10BenauiteSrFe33+(HPO4,PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.10CrandalliteCaAl3(PO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10DussertiteBaFe33+(AsO4)2(OH)5
8.BL.10EylettersiteTh0.75Al3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.10GorceixiteBaAl3(PO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10GoyaziteSrAl3(PO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10KintoreitePbFe3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
8.BL.10PhilipsbornitePbAl3(AsO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
8.BL.10SegnititePbFe33+(AsO4)2(OH,H2O)6
8.BL.10SpringcreekiteBaV33+(PO4)2(OH,H2O)6
8.BL.13Arsenoflorencite-(La)LaAl3(AsO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Arsenoflorencite-(Nd)NdAl3(AsO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Arsenoflorencite-(Ce)CeAl3(AsO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Florencite-(Ce)CeAl3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Florencite-(La)LaAl3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Florencite-(Nd)(Nd,La,Ce)Al3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13WaylanditeBiAl3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13ZaïriteBiFe33+(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13ArsenowaylanditeBiAl3(AsO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Graulichite-(Ce)CeFe33+(AsO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.13Florencite-(Sm)(Sm,Nd)Al3(PO4)2(OH)6
8.BL.15ViitaniemiiteNa(Ca,Mn2+)Al(PO4)(F,OH)3
8.BL.25PattersonitePbFe33+(PO4)2(OH)5 · H2O
22.3.1ParnauiteCu9(AsO4)2(SO4)(OH)10 · 7H2O
22.3.2ArdealiteCa2(HPO4)(SO4) · 4H2O
22.3.3Machatschkiite(Ca,Na)6(AsO4)(HAsO4)3(PO4,SO4) · 15H2O
22.3.4ClinotyroliteCa2Cu9(AsO4,SO4)4(OH,O)10 · 10H2O
22.3.5PeisleyiteNa3Al16(PO4)10(SO4)2(OH)17•20H2O
22.3.6ChalcophylliteCu18Al2(SO4)3(AsO4)3(OH)27 · 33H2O
22.3.7WoodhouseiteCaAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.8Schlossmacherite(H3O)Al3(SO4)2(OH)6
22.3.9SvanbergiteSrAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.10KemmlitziteSrAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.11SanjuaniteAl2(PO4)(SO4)(OH) · 9H2O
22.3.12KribergiteAl5(PO4)3(SO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
22.3.13HotsoniteAl11(SO4)3(PO4)2(OH)21 · 16H2O
22.3.14WeileriteBaAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.15TsumebitePb2Cu(PO4)(SO4)(OH)
22.3.16ArsentsumebitePb2Cu(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)
22.3.17HinsdalitePbAl3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.18HidalgoitePbAl3(AsO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.19Orpheite
22.3.20CoconinoiteFe23+Al2(UO2)2(PO4)4(SO4)(OH)2 · 20H2O
22.3.21Sasaite(Al,Fe3+)14(PO4)11(SO4)(OH)7 · 83H2O
22.3.22Tristramite(Ca,U,Fe)(PO4,SO4) · 2H2O
22.3.23CorkitePbFe3(PO4)(SO4)(OH)6
22.3.25DiadochiteFe23+(PO4)(SO4)(OH) · 5H2O
22.3.26SarmientiteFe23+(AsO4)(SO4)(OH) · 5H2O
22.3.27BukovskýiteFe23+(AsO4)(SO4)(OH) · 9H2O
22.3.28ZýkaiteFe43+(AsO4)3(SO4)(OH) · 15H2O
22.3.29TooeleiteFe63+(As3+O3)4(SO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
22.3.30Pitticite(Fe, SO4, AsO4, H2O) ?
22.3.31Xiangjiangite(Fe3+,Al)(UO2)4(PO4)2(SO4)2(OH) · 22H2O

Other Names for Beudantite

Name in Other Languages:

Other Information

Other Information:
Soluble in HCl.
Health Risks:
No information on health risks for this material has been entered into the database. You should always treat mineral specimens with care.

References for Beudantite

Reference List:
Lévy (1826) Annals of Philosophy, London: 11: 194.

Percy, J. (1850) On the composition of beudantite. Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science: 37: 161-169.

Dauber, H. (1857) Ueber Svanbergit und Beudantit. Annalen der Physik, Halle, Leipzig: 176: 579.

Rammelsberg, C. (1857) Ueber die Zusammensetzung des Beudantits. Annalen der Physik, Halle, Leipzig: 176: 581-583.

Sandberger, F. (1857) Ueber den Beudantit und seine Modificationen. Annalen der Physik, Halle, Leipzig: 176: 611-619.

Lacroix (1915) Bulletin de la Société française de Minéralogie: 38: 35.

Hintze, Carl (1931) Handbuch der Mineralogie. Berlin and Leipzig. 6 volumes: 1 [4A]: 729.

Simpson (1938) Journal of the Royal Society of Western Australia: 24: 110.

Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 7th edition, revised and enlarged, 1124 pp.: 1001-1002.

Walenta, K. (1966) Beiträge zur Kenntnis seltener Arsenatmineralien unter besonderer Berücksichtigung von Vorkommen des Schwarzwaldes. 3. Folge. Tschermaks Mineral. Petrog. Mitt., 11, 121–164, esp. 122–129 (in German). Canadian Mineralogist: 26: 923-932.

Szymański, J.T. (1988) The crystal structure of beudantite, Pb(Fe, Al)3[(As, S)O4]2(OH)6. Canadian Mineralogist, 26, 923–932.

Giuseppetti, G. and C. Tadini (1989) Beudantite: PbFe3(SO4)(AsO4)(OH)6, its crystal structure, tetrahedral site disordering and scattered Pb distribution. Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Monatshefte (1989): 27-33.

Anthony, J.W., Bideaux, R.A., Bladh, K.W., and Nichols, M.C. (2000) Handbook of Mineralogy, Volume IV. Arsenates, Phosphates, Vanadates. Mineral Data Publishing, Tucson, AZ, 680pp.: 66.

Sejkora, J., Škovíra, J., Čejka, J. & Plášil, J. (2009): Cu-rich members of the beudantite-segnitite series from the Krupka ore district, the Krušné hory Mountains, Czech Republic. Journal of Geosciences, 54, 355-371.

Internet Links for Beudantite

Specimens:
The following Beudantite specimens are currently listed for sale on minfind.com.

Localities for Beudantite

map shows a selection of localities that have latitude and longitude coordinates recorded. Click on the symbol to view information about a locality. The symbol next to localities in the list can be used to jump to that position on the map.
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2015, except where stated. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: July 4, 2015 02:57:53 Page generated: July 3, 2015 05:27:24