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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976

Last Updated: 6th Dec 2019

By Larry Maltby

The Ontonagon Boulder

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The entrance to the Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.


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This is the Ontonagon Boulder on display at the Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show in 1976. The Board of Directors of the Michigan Mineralogical Society decided that this would be a nice bicentennial theme for the show. Paul Desautels, curator of the Department of Gems and Minerals, at the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian), agreed and supported the effort.


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Here is a close-up of the Ontonagon Boulder. It shows a chisel cut just to the right of center. The surface texture of the copper has a “softness” suggesting that during flooding of the Ontonagon River sand suspended in the water wore down the surface.
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On this corner of the Ontonagon Boulder are the letters “IH”. The Jesuit missionary Claude Dablon visited the Boulder in 1667 causing some to suggest that the “IH” is a religious symbol. It is clear that a subsequent traveler attempted to chisel off this corner for keep sake.

The Smithsonian was willing to loan the boulder to the Michigan Mineralogical Society for the display but it was the society’s responsibility to move the 3708 pound specimen to Detroit and return it safely after the show. On the Wednesday prior to the show two of us caught an early morning flight to Washington D. C. We picked up a rental truck at the airport and the Smithsonian loaded the boulder on the truck for the drive to Detroit. We got in late that night and delivered the boulder to the Detroit Light Guard Armory on Thursday morning. The Armory personnel moved the boulder into position for the display. After the show, the process was reversed and, to the relief of everyone, the boulder was back at the Smithsonian.



David Wilber and the “Queen Collection”.

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“The Queen Collection”, over one hundred specimens from the Tourmaline Queen Mine, Pala Mining District, San Diego County, California.
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David Wilber at the Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
David Wilber displayed this amazing collection of a single mineral species from a single location at the Detroit Show in 1976. As he was building this collection, he brought some of the “Queen” tourmalines to Detroit in 1973 and 1974 as shown below. By 1981 the “Queen” collection was expanded to nearly 200 specimens that represented the pegmatite minerals of San Diego County, California. The collection was then sold to Perkins Sams and now resides at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

Reference: Mineralogical Record Biographical Archive.


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David’s selection of specimens from the Tourmaline Queen Mine. The specimen center-rear has been referred to as the “beer cans”. Detroit 1973.
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Detail of the large tourmaline shown on the left. Detroit 1973.
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David’s selection of specimens from the Tourmaline Queen Mine. The specimen center-rear has been referred to as the “beer cans”. Detroit 1973.
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Detail of the large tourmaline shown on the left. Detroit 1973.
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David’s selection of specimens from the Tourmaline Queen Mine. The specimen center-rear has been referred to as the “beer cans”. Detroit 1973.
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Detail of the large tourmaline shown on the left. Detroit 1973.


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Here is a selection Tourmaline crystals from the Tourmaline Queen Mine, Detroit 1974.


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After being first introduced at Detroit in 1974, the “Stamp Tourmaline”, also from the Tourmaline Queen Mine, made another appearance at Detroit in 1976.
The “Stamp Tourmaline” was discovered at the Tourmaline Queen Mine in 1913. Evidently it was acquired by the Smithsonian and then traded to the University of Texas, Austin where it resided unnoticed for many years. In 1967 David Wilber saw the specimen displayed at the Charlie Key, Rick Smith shop in New Jersey. Evidently the University was looking for a buyer. David was interested, but he was told that it had been promised to the Smithsonian. Years went by and the deal was not completed. At the 1974 Tucson show the announcement was made that this tourmaline would be featured on a U.S. postage stamp. With that notoriety Wilber put together a trade and was able to acquire the specimen from the University. In 1983 John Barlow acquired the now famous tourmaline from David Wilber and placed a photo of it on the cover of his book published in 1996.

Reference: F. J. Barlow, R. W. Jones, G. L. LaBerge, 1996, The F. John Barlow Mineral Collection, Page 105.





The John Barlow Collection

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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
John Barlow (1914-2004)

John was a man of unlimited energy and enthusiasm. In 1949 with a rather small investment, he founded AZCO Inc., a very successful company that specialized in industrial piping. It wasn’t until 1970 at the age of 56 that he became interested in minerals but once he started, he pursued the study of mineralogy and acquisition of world class specimens with his characteristic enthusiasm. He was very competitive and won many awards with his growing mineral collection including the Ed McDole Memorial Trophy in 1975 at Tucson. His collection eventually reached over 5,000 high quality specimens.


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The F. John Barlow Mineral Collection, Published in 1996.
“The F. John Barlow Mineral Collection” is a book about a man who set his mind on acquiring a world class mineral collection. It is not the usual story about a kid that starts picking up rocks at age five. John was 56 years old in 1970 when he started his relentless pursuit of fine minerals. The book is filled with stories of his maneuvers to acquire especially fine specimens. It mentions his interaction with many well-known dealers, curators and collectors while discussing the provenance of fine minerals. The book makes a significant contribution to documenting the history of mineral collecting in the United States during the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s.

The book was written by 14 authors, some of them registered members of Mindat. The lion’s share of editing was done by Bob Jones and Gene LaBerge with the oversight of John Barlow. The book contains over 500 high quality photos of minerals.

This book was used to enhance the descriptions of some of the specimens that were displayed here at the Detroit Show and also photographed later for the book. It is also interesting to note the specimens shown here that were not included in the book.


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Barlow Collection
Herderite….This crystal, 14.0 cm tall, is described as Hydroxylherderite in the book. It was the finest specimen in a pocket discovered in 1976 at the Xanda Mine, Virgem de lapa, Minas Gerais, Brazil. That same year it was acquired by John Barlow from Ed Swoboda and Bill Larson. It appeared on the cover of the Mineralogical Record, Volume 10, January – February, 1979.
Rose Quartz….(11.0 x 7.5 x 7.0 cm) Sapucaia Pegmatite, Governador Valadares District, Minas Gerais, Brazil. It was discovered in the 1960’s and originally acquired by Peter Bancroft. A photo of this specimen was shown in Bancroft’s book, Gem and Crystal Treasures.
Grossular….(8.0 x 6.5 x 4.0 cm) Jeffery Mine, Asbestos, Quebec, Canada. Although many specimens like this have been produced over many years, this is one of the finest. The crystals, the largest being 2.0 cm wide, are of near gem quality with brilliant faces. This specimen was featured in Bancroft’s book, Gem and Crystal Treasures and in the Mineralogical Record, Volume 7, Number 3, 1976.
Gold….(12.8 x 8.5 x 1.5 cm) Winnemucca, Humboldt Co. Nevada. The book gives the location as being within either the Winnemucca District or the nearby Ten Mile District. A review of both Districts in the Mindat data base suggests that the Ten Mile District is the most likely.
Silver….(8.0 x 7.5 x 5.5 cm) Kearsarge Lode, Houghton Co. Michigan. This specimen is truly a very fine example of well crystalized silver with copper from the Keweenaw. In chapter 17 of his book John tells stores of his collecting experiences. He heard that this silver was being offered for sale by a dealer in Magdalena, New Mexico. John immediately contacted his pilot and set up a flight to Magdalena on the following Sunday to see if he could make a deal. After some haggling, John flew home with the prize. When the specimen was displayed at the Detroit Show the location was given as Keweenaw Co. Michigan.


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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
Of the five specimens shown above only the Cuprite was illustrated in the book. This leaves us to speculate that during the 20 years that lapsed between this show and the publication of the book, some of these were sold or traded. It is hard to imagine that John would have left the Crocoite and the Apophyllite out of the book if he still had the specimens at that time.

Cuprite….(9.5 x 9.0 x 7.0 cm) Enike Mine, Onganja, near Seeis, Namibia. The Cuprite crystals are coated with Malachite and are perched on a Calcite matrix. (Largest crystal is 4.7 cm.) Many of these were coming out in the mid 70’s and this specimen was obtained from the Frank Collins collection. The label shown above is obsolete.


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Barlow Collection
The only specimen in this photo that was described in the book is the Amblygonite on the left. One specimen of Crocoite appears in the book that seems to have been added as an afterthought in the last chapter. Chapter 18 is a strange story titled “An Important Dream” in which John squeezes in another seven mineral photos. One is of a large single crystal of Crocoite. It would be interesting to know what happened to the magnificent Crocoite shown here.

The Phosphophyllite shown on the right is a wonderfully crystallized specimen of a rare species much sought after by collectors, however, the Phosphophyllite selected for the Book was a stunning gem quality fishtail twin with a deep bluegreen color.

Montebrasite (Probably amblygonite)….(4.3 x 4.0 x 2.0 cm) Linopolis, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Insight into the mane of this mineral is somewhat cleared up by this quote from the Mindat data base. “Amblygonite-Montebrasite Series. The hydroxyl analogue of Amblygonite, Montebrasite is, by far, the most common member of the group. Amblygonite is scarce.” John acquired this piece at the “feeding frenzy” at the booth of Milton and Hilda Sklar on set-up day at the 1974 Lincoln, Nebraska Show. I was at this Show on the following Saturday so I missed the “feeding Frenzy”. It would have been out of my league anyway.


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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection


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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection


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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection


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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection
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Barlow Collection



The Wayne State University Display.

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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, 1976.
Below is a selection of close-up photos of some of the specimens displayed on the shelves above.
To see 130 Wayne State University specimens see here: https://www.mindat.org/article.php/2708/Wayne+State+University+Geology+Mineral+Museum%2C+1974


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Copper (9.0 x 21.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite on Copper (largest Crystal 6.5 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite with Copper inclusions (7 x 8 x 7 cm) Phoenix Mine, Phoenix, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.
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Copper (9.0 x 21.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite on Copper (largest Crystal 6.5 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite with Copper inclusions (7 x 8 x 7 cm) Phoenix Mine, Phoenix, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.
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Copper (9.0 x 21.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite on Copper (largest Crystal 6.5 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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Calcite with Copper inclusions (7 x 8 x 7 cm) Phoenix Mine, Phoenix, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.


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Calcite on Copper with Silver (12.7 x 12.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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. Datolite (12.5 x 10 x 8 cm) Mesnard Mine, Quincy Mine, Hancock, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Malachite after Azurite (12.7 x 7.7 cm), Tsumeb, South West Africa.
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Calcite on Copper with Silver (12.7 x 12.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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. Datolite (12.5 x 10 x 8 cm) Mesnard Mine, Quincy Mine, Hancock, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Malachite after Azurite (12.7 x 7.7 cm), Tsumeb, South West Africa.
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Calcite on Copper with Silver (12.7 x 12.0 cm) Keweenaw Peninsula, Michigan.
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. Datolite (12.5 x 10 x 8 cm) Mesnard Mine, Quincy Mine, Hancock, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Malachite after Azurite (12.7 x 7.7 cm), Tsumeb, South West Africa.


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Fluorite with Celestine (largest crystal 5.0 cm) Clay Center, Ohio.
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Manganite on Barite (14.0 x 7.8 cm) Lucy Mine, Negaunee, Michigan.
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Amethyst, Port Arthur, Ontario.
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Fluorite with Celestine (largest crystal 5.0 cm) Clay Center, Ohio.
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Manganite on Barite (14.0 x 7.8 cm) Lucy Mine, Negaunee, Michigan.
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Amethyst, Port Arthur, Ontario.
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Fluorite with Celestine (largest crystal 5.0 cm) Clay Center, Ohio.
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Manganite on Barite (14.0 x 7.8 cm) Lucy Mine, Negaunee, Michigan.
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Amethyst, Port Arthur, Ontario.



The Cranbrook Institute of Science Display

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Left: Quartz cluster from Ouray, Colorado, center: Limonite from the Isle of Elba, right: Dolomite from Eagle Co. Colorado.



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Dealer display


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Dealer Display.

A major discovery of these superb wulfenite crystals at the San Francisco Mine, Magdalena, Mexico produced an abundance of specimens. Some were associated with mimetite. The find was introduced at Detroit and a large number of these were also available at the Tucson Show in February, 1977.


Louis Lafayette

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Lou Lafayette at the Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show in 1976.
Louis Lafayette….(shown here in the tan suit taking a long look at the Barlow collection) was a long standing member of the Michigan Mineralogical Society and a superb field collector. I heard that Lou had two outstanding specimens from the Keweenaw in Michigan. I was able to arrange a visit to his home to photograph the “Champion Copper” and the “Seneca Silver”. They are shown below along with several other specimens in his collection.


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Copper (9.5 cm) Champion Mine, Painesdale, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Sulphur (4.0 cm) Maybee Quarry, Monroe Co. Michigan.
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Silver with Copper (10.0 cm) Seneca No. 1 Shaft, Seneca Mine, Mohawk, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.
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Copper (9.5 cm) Champion Mine, Painesdale, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Sulphur (4.0 cm) Maybee Quarry, Monroe Co. Michigan.
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Silver with Copper (10.0 cm) Seneca No. 1 Shaft, Seneca Mine, Mohawk, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.
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Copper (9.5 cm) Champion Mine, Painesdale, Houghton Co., Michigan.
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Sulphur (4.0 cm) Maybee Quarry, Monroe Co. Michigan.
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Silver with Copper (10.0 cm) Seneca No. 1 Shaft, Seneca Mine, Mohawk, Keweenaw Co., Michigan.
I have never seen the “Seneca Silver” pictured in mineralogical literature. This may be the only photo that documents its existence. However, the “Champion Copper” appeared in the Mineralogical Record, Volume 23, Number 2, March-April, 1992. This was a special issue titled “Michigan Copper Country” authored by Mark L. Wilson of the New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources and Stanly J. Dyl of the Seaman Mineral Museum. The photo was taken by Debra Wilson, Mark’s wife, and described as a Type 1, branching growth (Ref. Dana 1886) in the isometric crystal system.

Both Mark and Debra Wilson are originally from Michigan and knew Lou Lafayette well. They have described Lou as a mentor in their life-long interest in minerals.


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Titanite, Diopside, Scapolite (11.0 cm) Otter Lake, Pontiac RCM, Outaouais, Québec, Canada.
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Witherite (4.5 cm) Minerva Mine, Cave-in-rock, Illinois.
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Elbaite (8.0 cm) Golconda pegmatite field, Governador Valadares, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
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Titanite, Diopside, Scapolite (11.0 cm) Otter Lake, Pontiac RCM, Outaouais, Québec, Canada.
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Witherite (4.5 cm) Minerva Mine, Cave-in-rock, Illinois.
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Elbaite (8.0 cm) Golconda pegmatite field, Governador Valadares, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
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Titanite, Diopside, Scapolite (11.0 cm) Otter Lake, Pontiac RCM, Outaouais, Québec, Canada.
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Witherite (4.5 cm) Minerva Mine, Cave-in-rock, Illinois.
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Elbaite (8.0 cm) Golconda pegmatite field, Governador Valadares, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
Titanite, Diopside, Scapolite….There is a story connected with this specimen that attests to the prowess of Lou Lafayette’s field collecting ability. As I recall, Ed Wilson, a past president of the Michigan Mineralogical Society, and his teen age son, Steve, went on a collecting trip into Canada with Lou. At Otter Lake, in Québec, Steve opened a pocket just big enough to get a hand into. Lou reached in and told Steve that he could feel the crystals of a good specimen in the pocket. Steve worked the area for a while to no avail. Lou started on the task trying to figure how to get in without destroying the crystals. He finally produced the crack that opened the pocket and with some good luck the specimen above came out intact. As Steve’s experience grew, he also became an avid field collector and is now a retired geologist that worked for the State of Michigan.


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Fluorite, Calcite, Chalcopyrite (8.0 cm) Naica, Saucillo Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Rose Quartz (7.0 cm) Espírito Santo, Brazil.
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Fluorite, Calcite, Chalcopyrite (8.0 cm) Naica, Saucillo Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Rose Quartz (7.0 cm) Espírito Santo, Brazil.
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Fluorite, Calcite, Chalcopyrite (8.0 cm) Naica, Saucillo Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Rose Quartz (7.0 cm) Espírito Santo, Brazil.


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Vanadinite (FOV 3.6 cm) San Carlos Mine, San Carlos, Manuel Benavides Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Legrandite (FOV 3.5 cm) Ojuela Mine, Mapimí, Mapimí Municipality, Durango, Mexico.
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Vanadinite (FOV 3.6 cm) San Carlos Mine, San Carlos, Manuel Benavides Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Legrandite (FOV 3.5 cm) Ojuela Mine, Mapimí, Mapimí Municipality, Durango, Mexico.
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Vanadinite (FOV 3.6 cm) San Carlos Mine, San Carlos, Manuel Benavides Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Legrandite (FOV 3.5 cm) Ojuela Mine, Mapimí, Mapimí Municipality, Durango, Mexico.


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Fluorite (12.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Autunite (FOV 5.0 cm) Daybreak Mine, Spokane Co., Washington.
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Fluorite (12.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Autunite (FOV 5.0 cm) Daybreak Mine, Spokane Co., Washington.
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Fluorite (12.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Autunite (FOV 5.0 cm) Daybreak Mine, Spokane Co., Washington.


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Fluorite (9.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Vanadinite (Var: Arsenatian Vanadinite) (7.0 cm) Erupción Mine, Los Lamentos Mts, Ahumada Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Fluorite (9.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Vanadinite (Var: Arsenatian Vanadinite) (7.0 cm) Erupción Mine, Los Lamentos Mts, Ahumada Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.
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Fluorite (9.0 cm) Stoneco Auglaize Quarry, Junction, Paulding Co., Ohio.
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Vanadinite (Var: Arsenatian Vanadinite) (7.0 cm) Erupción Mine, Los Lamentos Mts, Ahumada Municipality, Chihuahua, Mexico.


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Wulfenite (13.0 cm) Defiance Mine, Gleeson, Arizona.









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Discuss this Article

6th Dec 2019 23:37 UTCBob Harman

Really nice article, LARRY!

Those were the glory days of Detroit. At that time the show was large, well attended and one of the premier shows in the Midwest and the whole US. Unfortunately, those days did not last.    The show's venue was in a not so great part of the city, so by the 1990's, with urban decay and the city of Detroit in major decline, the show had fallen on hard times.   In the 1990s and early 2000s the sponsoring club had been reluctant to face up to the fact that crime to dealers and show goers had risen and attendance both by dealers and show goers had really, really fallen off.
Finally, several years ago, the venue was changed to a new site on the campus of Macomb Community College.....much nicer and more safe......The last several years have been ones of rebuilding for this show. Now time will tell if the Detroit Show will, once again, get to its former elite mineral show status.    CHEERS.....BOB  

   

7th Dec 2019 19:03 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Bob, yes the Detroit Show was a major international event in the 70’s. The current show is also excellent but I have not attended since we moved up north. The Michigan Mineralogical Society is still going strong. If you go to their web site and click on “Mineral of the Month” you can scroll through many interesting subjects presented with high quality photography.

7th Dec 2019 01:00 UTCPaul Brandes Manager

Excellent article, Larry!!!

I knew the dealer in Magdalena, NM that had the Barlow silver. Apparently, he knew the specimen was nice, but really didn't know exactly what it was worth. When John heard of the specimen, he went bonkers trying to get down there to buy it. I had the pleasure of meeting John a couple times in the 1990s and what a character to talk with.....

7th Dec 2019 19:04 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Paul, I never had a conversation with Barlow but from reading his book I can imagine that he was a character, extremely competitive in his efforts to acquire specimens.

9th Dec 2019 16:36 UTCPaul Brandes Manager

You have no idea....

7th Dec 2019 15:33 UTCTony L. Potucek Expert

Thanks for the stroll down one of my "Memory Lanes", Larry!  Those San Francisco Mine wulfenites were mined by Brad and Curt van Scriver.  Curt and I were best buds, and he had my wife Marcie and I map the San Francisco Mine for them, as well as help collect specimens from the great finds.  I think that Curt and Brad debuted these specimens at the Detroit Show, and they were collected prior to the Detroit Show, mostly during the summer and early fall.  We used to have wulfenite fights in the stope, using massive clots of wulfenite, and throw them at each other.  The intention was to hit the stope wall near the body and create a shower of orange and yellow glitter and sparkles in our mine lights.  Yeah, we were a little off bubble at times, but the mine was way out in the desert and canyons of Northern Sonora.  You had to make your own entertainment.  Some of the individual wulfenite crystals measured over 12 cm on an edge.

7th Dec 2019 19:11 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Tony, thanks for that story. It was an amazing find. I think that I also photographed a case of those wulfenites at Tucson the following year. If I can find the photo I will post it.

9th Dec 2019 14:53 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Tony,
I did find the photos that I took at the 1977 Tucson Show. Two close-ups are shown below. Your comments motivated me to dig a little deeper and I eventually found my copy of The Mineralogical Record, Volume 35, Number 6, 2004 titled “Mexico”. As you know it contains a marvelous article written by Thomas Moore that documents the collecting of wulfenite during the 1970’s at the San Francisco Mine. It includes your photos at the mine in 1976 and 1993 and also the major pocket that you photographed in 1994.

The wulfenite mined by the van Scriver’s with the help of you and your wife, was introduced at Detroit in 1976 as we thought. I am amazed by the fact that the article states that in November of 1976, after the Detroit Show, mining started again and 700 flats of specimens were accumulated prior to the Tucson Show in 1977.

The article also shows many superb photos of the “window pane” wulfenites with mimetite spheres taken by Jeff Scovil and Wendell Wilson.

9th Dec 2019 14:56 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

00147970015759033121542.jpg
Wulfenite at Tucson 1977.

9th Dec 2019 14:58 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

09704910015759034627011.jpg
Wulfenite at Tucson 1977.

9th Dec 2019 15:28 UTCTony L. Potucek Expert

Thanks for the additional postings, Larry.  Lovely specimens, and the mine was a prolific producer during the collector mining periods for sure.

7th Dec 2019 19:00 UTCJolyon Ralph Founder

Do you know the dates the show was on in 1976? I'd like to add it to the show directory.

7th Dec 2019 19:53 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Jolyon, the dates were always for the second weekend in October. In the 1976 calendar that would be October 8, 9, and 10, 1976.

10th Dec 2019 04:30 UTCHerwig Pelckmans Expert

Thanks a zillion, Larry!
The unusal approach of this show report makes it all the more interesting.
Fun  to see a much younger Dave Wilber. Was wondering how Barlow would have looked. 
Any chance you have a photo of him you could include in this report, Larry? That would kind of make it complete, so to speak.
Keep up the excellent work!
Cheers, Herwig 

10th Dec 2019 10:34 UTCLarry Maltby Expert

Herwig,

I don’t have a photo of John Barlow that I have permission to publish; however, here is a link to an article in the Rocks and Minerals magazine by Dr. Gene LaBerge that has a picture.


John and I have something in common, a very high forehead.




10th Dec 2019 12:19 UTCJohn Montgomery Expert

Most interesting article Larry. The curator of mineralogy at the Canadian Museum of Nature was at the Detroit Show this year and she thought it was very good. 
 
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