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The 46th Annual Friends of Mineralogy Pacific Northwest Chapter Mineral Symposium

Last Updated: 22nd Oct 2019

By Erin Delventhal

This is a LIVE report, keep this page loaded for live updates - new images will appear as they are added.



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I’m live this weekend at the Friends of Mineralogy Pacific Northwest Mineral Symposium. This is another wonderful annual symposium - there’s been some debate over which year it actually is but it’s been agreed that 46 is a good guess.
The theme this year is Specimen Mines of the West. Here’s a lovely photo of a Blanchard Mine linarite by Doug Merson.



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Virgil Lueth has opened with a talk on the Chino Mine, New Mexico.



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The mascot of the New Mexico Mineral Museum: a chile pepper shaped spinel twinned copper.
(For public record, “chile” IS the correct spelling.)



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Also, some geology of the mine!



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The Chino Mine is one of the oldest mines in the country, with copper artifacts dated to ~800 AD.



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Per some interesting discussion of the name Chino, which means Chinaman in Spanish: there was no significant Chinese presence at any point in the mine’s history, so Virgil has proposed the name comes from a slang usage of “Chino” that means curly or kinked, in reference to the copper forms.



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Alex Homenuke is now presenting “The Keno Hull, Galena Hill Area, Yukon.”



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Geology!



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Some representation of silver production.



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Incredibly rich silver ore!



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Aragonite with a mysterious yellow crust.



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Interesting pyrite morphology.



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The most interesting inclusion: silver in ice!



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Galena!



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Polybasite on matrix.



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There are some delightful exhibits also. Here’s a display from the Rice Museum, which we will visit on Monday.



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I’ve just finished presenting on the Blanchard Mine, New Mexico.



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Les Presmyk is now presenting on the Red Cloud Mine, Arizona.



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Some continuing back and forth friendly competition between Arizona and New Mexico.



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A timeline of Red Cloud history.



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Though the Red Cloud is in remote desert, the Colorado River was used for the majority of transportation in and out of the district.



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GEOLOGY!



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An older specimen.



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Some stories about Ed Over’s collecting at the Red Cloud.



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A pocket that created a 5am phone call.



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Unheard of size of specimens.



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Other species from the Red Cloud. Note that there is no confirmed macro vanadinite from the Red Cloud.



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More wulfenite!



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A case of magnesium minerals.



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Nevada pegmatite Minerals!



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Miscellaneous specimens from western mines.



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I just have to point out this Blanchard linarite on quartz - larger quartz crystals at the Blanchard are unusual.



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Virgil is back up with the Magdalena District, New Mexico: More Than Just Smithsonite.”



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Kelly Mine smithsonite, of course.



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Geology!



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Mining history!



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The old mining town of Kelly.



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One of the many overlooked mines from the Magdalena District: the Graphic Mine.



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A Waldo-Graphic pyrite specimen.



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Magdalena mineralization is a great example of ore deposit weathering.



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Malachite from over the hill from the Magdalena District.



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A Juanita Mine azurite.



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Virgil has insisted on educating us.



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Smithsonite ps. Copper.



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The “complicated” part.



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A display of Idaho minerals.



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More mixed western localities.



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There’s a contest of self collected minerals with a couple different subcategories. (I think this is a great idea!)



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More western specimens!



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Toby Seim has a group of lovely quartz ps. hematite ps. ??? from Bessemer Ridge, Washington.
(I’ve added one to my collection.)



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Dinner is underway.



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A live auction is about to begin!



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First item up is a group of Bruce Kelley’s photomicrographs as greeting cards.



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Now a very large Rat’s Nest specimen.



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Up soon are some items with some very intriguing provenance!



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Socializing has been very busy! Rob Woodside is here and we’ve had some wonderful conversations!



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More Western minerals!



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One of my instant favorites from the last case.



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More amazing specimens!



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An excellent parisite-(Ce) from Montana.



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Mammoth St. Anthony!



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Les Presmyk is back with a talk on The Pioneer District.



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Some overview of Arizona geology.



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We’re hearing some stories about the mine superintendent and workers of the Silver King Mine.



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Silver King Mine silver specimens.



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Magma Mine, ~1910-1911.



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The Magma Mine had the first cooling system installed, as temperatures reached 150° F.



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Chalcocite from the Magma Mine.



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Chalcopyrite from the Magma, including a botryoidal example.



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Some excellent calcite crystals.



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And of course, Magma Mine barytes.



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Alex Homenuke is finishing up the talks with The Highland Bell Mine, British Columbia.



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A ~10 ounce bar given as employee gifts.



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Production figures.



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A section view of the Upper and Lower Lass showing the complexity of faulting.



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An example of ore texture.



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Wire silver.



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Acanthite crystals on wire silver.



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Another delightful acanthite.



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Acanthite, silver, and some laumontite.



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Sternbergite!



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And this talk has ended on a high note - exquisite silver!



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The symposium is officially over and everyone is packing up.
We’ll stop by the Rice Museum of Rocks and Minerals tomorrow to finish up the live report.



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I’m now at the Rice Museum of Rocks & Minerals! Julian Gray is about to give me a tour!



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Richard and Helen Rice and their daughter Sharleen founded the museum as a way to preserve their collection as a museum.



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Some of Richard and Helen’s trophies, including the Woodruff Trophy awarded by the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies.



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Oregon geology.



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The museum hosts many field trips from school children.



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One of the best known specimens in the Rice Museum collection: the Alma Rose.



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The main mineral exhibit.



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Arguably the world’s best sperrylite.



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Chinese aragonite.



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Michigan coppers and calcites.



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Some WOW from Europe.



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Colorado huebnerite.



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Exceptional Argentinian rhodochrosites.

I’d like to note that the scale of things is a bit tricky in this museum - everything is much larger than I imagined from pictures I’d seen before, and my photos aren’t showing the scale well either.



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Variscite!



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The world’s largest phosgenite crystal.



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An actual specimen of lavendulan! (I’ve never seen one in person before!)



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Rhodonite!



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Fabulous “glendonites.”



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Miscellaneous quartz specimens - giant pseudo in the back!



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!!!



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Quartz ps. Twinned calcite.



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Diamonds.



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Largest morganite I’ve ever seen.



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Beryl!



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A very nice tourmaline.



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Dal’negorsk!
(I am very envious of this specimen.)



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Amazonite and smoky quartz.



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Arizona hemimorphite with copper!



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Big Arizona dioptase!



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Exceptional Bisbee pseudomorph!



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Tiger, Arizona specimens.



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BIG wulfenites!



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Creedite from Khazakstan!



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Twinned cinnabar crystals!

(I’m wearing out my exclamation key!)



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Wise Mine fluorite!



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Cerussite!



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I drooled a little over this one.



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Huge atacamite.



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More Arizona.



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An excellent copper specimen!



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Beautiful azurite and malachite.



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Malachite!



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Legrandite.



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Benitoites and neptunites.

(Also some fun scapolite series specimens, which have given me a missing locality detail for a specimen in my collection!)



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BIG crocoites!



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Gail and Jim Spann currently have a guest exhibit!



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Incredible Indian quartz!



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“Popcorn” calcite.



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One of the best New Mexico aurichalcites I have ever seen.



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Barite var. Oakstone.



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Okay, so the minerals are incredible but there are some other displays we need to go look at - many of which are items I never thought I’d be impressed by, but here I am being impressed.



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Petrified wood!

Here’s an Oregon piece - I think these qualify as bog wood, but don’t quote me on that because I am not a petrified wood expert.



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Fern.



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White oak from Oregon.



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Palm from Indonesia.



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Spruce from Nevada.



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Douglas fir from Washington.



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This exhibit is on loan from Dennis and Mary Murphy, and this panel shows some of the equipment used to cut and polish such large specimens.



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Giant cycad!



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Conifer from Arizona.



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Cubes of petrified wood by species!



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Fossilized seeds and nuts.



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So much variety to colors and textures.



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“Candlewood” from Indonesia.



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Pine cones!



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Precious opalized wood from Nevada.



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Important notices.



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Now to gems!
This is the Harvey Lapidary Arts Gallery, dedicated to Sharleen K. and William Harvey Sr.



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Mt. Hood in opal.



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A rough and cut exhibit, all stones cut by Bill Harvey.



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An enormous fluorite vase carved in Beijing, China.



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Cut stones from the collection of Russell Snook.



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Carvings of “myrickite” donated by John Li.



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Oregon sunstones.



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The Meieran Trilliant Gemstone Collection is also currently on display.



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Color variation in tourmaline.



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A whole spectrum of color.



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These two gigantic helidors are quite impressive also.



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Now on to the Agate Gallery!



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Alberto Rey currently has a guest exhibit of Mexican agates.



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One word: color.
Another word: banding.



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“Crazy labe” agates.



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Amethystine agates.



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There’s a whole case about polyhedral agates!



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These are just so neat!



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Another important notice.



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Brazilian agates.



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A bit of information about coloration in agates.



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The fluorescent display!



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And under long + short wave.

(I think there is more to this museum than I can possibly fit into this live report.)



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A Brazilian emerald waiting to be put back on display.



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There are also more crystal models here than all the models I have ever seen combined.



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But wait, there’s more!

This is the Northwest Mineral Gallery, dedicated to local rocks and minerals.



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A wall panel display of localities with buttons to light up deposit types!

(Note: I want one of these for New Mexico!)



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We’ll get straight into what we’ve all been waiting for: Rudy Tschernich’s Zeolite Collection.



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The Rat’s Nest Mine, Idaho.



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Natrolite with apophyllite from Weyerhaeuser Lincoln Cr. Quarry, Washington.



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Stilbite from Road 5700, Washington.



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Washington datolite.



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Puffy minerals!



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A delightful mesolite!



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There’s a really nice complement between specimens, collecting photos, and educational information.



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Thomsonite-Ca specimens.



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Boggsite with tschernichite in 2mm cavities.



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Mordenite ps. Calcite!



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Erionite-K.



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Edingtonite ps. Calcite!



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Yugawaralite.



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Barrerite.



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Moving into some specimens not from the northwest: harmotome!



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California laumontite.



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Gyrolite on quartz.



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Natrolite.



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This is an absolutely incredible display of a huge variety of zeolite and associated species - having them all in one place to compare is fascinating.



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Back to other northwest!



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Local jaspers.



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PALYGORSKITE!

(All caps intentional - I may make a future goal of including a palygorskite in every live report I do.)



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Awaruite!



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Calcite ps. Aragonite (?).



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Idaho fluorite.



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An anorthite boulder.



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Pyrite with curved crystals.



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Oregon cavansite and pentagonite!



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Ludwigite.



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Zektzerite.



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Fluorite on petrified wood!



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Falcondoite.



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Amethyst.



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And another quartz I assume is from nearby the last one.



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We’re getting ready to do some work around the museum so I’m going to pause on this one and finish up the report later.



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Amethyst scepters!



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Quartz.



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A few Spruce pieces.



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Japan law twinned quartz.



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Sawtooth quartz and feldspar.



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A representation of a scolecite and stilbite pocket.



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Goethite ps. Pyrite.



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Quartz ps. Barite.



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“Angel wing” quartz - another clue to a missing locality on a specimen I’ve come across.



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BIG calcites!



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Smaller (but still lovely!) calcites.



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GIANT barites!

I hadn’t heard of this locality before, but these are pretty impressive!



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A thunderegg!



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International thundereggs.



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One case of local thundereggs, with a great graphic.



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An absolutely FUN display: rocks that look like food!



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I think I’d attempt to eat it.



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Breakfast and flowers!



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The Rice Museum is hosting an event this coming Saturday, October 26th, at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. Famed astronaut Story Musgrave will be speaking, and there will be snacks and drinks and an auction to benefit the Rice Museum. Here’s an auction sneak peek - if you’re in the area, be sure to stop by!



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A quick peek in the reference portion of Rudy’s collection has yielded two New Mexican zeolites - I think this could be improved.



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The property also has a beautiful yard and woods that run behind it - a great place for the kids to run around or hold events.



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There’s also a rock garden.



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Another thunderegg - massive!



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A giant block of pumice.
(I didn’t try to pick it up but I should have.)



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And a single basalt column!



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I think it’s about time to end this report, but it’s been a weekend filled with fantastic information, a spectacular museum, an absolutely lovely group of the mineral community, and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it!
I definitely hope to attend again in the future, and look forward to seeing many new friends again somewhere down the road!





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Discuss this Article

19th Oct 2019 22:45 UTCHarjo Neutkens Manager

Thanks Erin. Would have loved to hear your talk!

20th Oct 2019 00:09 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

I hope an opportunity for that to happen comes up at some point!

19th Oct 2019 22:58 UTCPaul Brandes Manager

Great report so far, Erin, but what exactly is a "Symposiu"? ;-)

20th Oct 2019 00:09 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

A “symposiu” is what happens when I’m fighting with a bug in the live report system while also trying to get ready to give a talk. ;)

20th Oct 2019 13:36 UTCJolyon Ralph Founder

Wasn't your fault. The title was limited to 80 characters before, and the m got truncated. I've fixed it so we can have longer titles, and added the missing character.

20th Oct 2019 13:38 UTCJolyon Ralph Founder

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We still have this problem on the home page though. Unlikely I can fix it immediately though, so if you wanted to make the title shorter let me know.

20th Oct 2019 17:12 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Thanks for fixing that!

I’m not sure I can make the title much shorter?  If/when I come back for another year and another report, it’s going to need the annual #.

21st Oct 2019 18:40 UTCDouglas Merson Expert

Not if, but when.

20th Oct 2019 01:28 UTCKevin Conroy Expert

Erin, congrats on the Bessemer Ridge specimen, those are classics!   I saw in the Liebetrau case that their great sample was labeled as possibly being after danburite.   Have you heard anything about this identification?   I read that danburite had been found there ( http://pnwfm.org/wp-content/uploads/bsk-pdf-manager/2018/01/PNWFM_Newsletter_2004-09.pdf ), but not as the primary mineral being pseudomorphed.

20th Oct 2019 17:15 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

I don’t know a thing about it - I’ll try to catch Al and ask but may not have time, so you could follow up with him?

20th Oct 2019 15:51 UTCTony L. Potucek Expert

Thanks for the excellent report, Erin!  The symposium in Kelso, WA is an excellent venue and I enjoyed being an invited speaker a few years ago.  Your report reminded me that I need to go back.

20th Oct 2019 17:15 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

It’s a delightful symposium and I definitely hope to come back!

20th Oct 2019 19:02 UTCPaul Brandes Manager

This seems like one of those symposiums that is very laid back, much like the upcoming New Mexico Mineral Symposium. (shameless plug ;-) One of these days, I'll have to make some time to attend this event.

20th Oct 2019 19:33 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

It is very much like the NM symposium - it’s felt like home except that there’s a lot more water outside!

22nd Oct 2019 02:36 UTCGareth Evans

Hello: 

I did not see a periodic table of the chemical elements made from real elements at the Museum. Does the Rice Museum have one, or are the chemical elements just a second thought as is the case with most Museums? 

And no I am not being picky, but it seems few Museums actually have a collection of the chemical elements. I am not talking about an average collection but a chemical element equivalent of the MIM in Beirut?

I would like to see large vacuum sealed flasks containing 1 kilo of Iodine (as large crystals), along with 500ml of Bromine and 100 ml of liquefied chlorine. Ingots of the transition metals and large containers full of the Lanthanide metals. And other element things too! 

Gareth

22nd Oct 2019 02:40 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Gareth,
Plans for a periodic table are underway.
I’m sure anything you want to see displayed could be done if you’d make a donation!

22nd Oct 2019 04:16 UTCGareth Evans

Dear Erin: 

I am working on a major display involving the Halogens (Cl, Br and I) and the Lanthanide Metals (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Eu) for 2020. 

I have spoken about this with the CEO (William Kroth) of the Sterling Hill Museum. 

I would love to make a donation but I am a very poor man. One does not earn much in retirement even with a PhD. It is a struggle to buy minerals and the chemical elements and I make many sacrifices to indulge in my interests.  

Kind Regards 

Gareth

22nd Oct 2019 00:04 UTCTony Albini

Erin, great report! 



22nd Oct 2019 02:40 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Thanks, Tony!

22nd Oct 2019 01:55 UTCKevin Conroy Expert

All of the specimens on display in the museum.... wow, just wow!

Erin, your job is to find an aquamarine on palygorskite!

22nd Oct 2019 02:43 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Kevin, that would easily be the best aquamarine ever!

22nd Oct 2019 03:13 UTCDavid Carter

The Rice Museum looks to be an amazing place to visit with many spectacular exhibits and, to round of with a couple more adjectives, what a fantastic and informative report. Many thanks indeed for sharing.

22nd Oct 2019 15:58 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Thanks David!  I definitely recommend visiting the Rice Museum - I didn’t manage to even get half the exhibits included!

22nd Oct 2019 18:53 UTCUwe Kolitsch Manager

Outstanding (both museum and report)!


“Calcite ps. Aragonite(?)” - this looks like typical glendonite (https://www.mindat.org/min-27112.html).

22nd Oct 2019 20:20 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Thanks Uwe!

That was my thought as well - with any luck I’ll be collecting a couple of these in the next day or so and I’ll confirm.

23rd Oct 2019 01:44 UTCFrank Karasti

Wow! I didn’t want it to end 
Thank you.

23rd Oct 2019 07:18 UTCErin Delventhal Manager

Thanks Frank!  I didn’t really want it to end either!

23rd Oct 2019 09:06 UTCKeith Compton Manager

Loved your report Erin.

That basalt column outside - at least it'll be a bit difficult for anyone to pocket it !!
Always wanted a basalt column in my yard - say 2 feet max, but that one is something else.

I was sad that I didn't see any Cassiterites (or cassiterite pseudos) in your report, but all those lovely wonderful zeolites and that nice Broken Hill Cerussite kind of made up for it!! ((-:)

Bet you wish you could have taken that little Rhodo at the end home with you !!!

Thanks muchly for all the time and effort in making the report for us all.

 
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