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My Hematite from Rio Marina (Elba island).

Last Updated: 12th Jul 2016

By Giuliano Bettini

I show here my Hematite samples of Rio Marina.
Over the years I have collected various samples.
Hematite from Rio Marina is famous all over the world. The crystals show micaceous habit, tabular, rhombohedral, or complex, and finally may be covered with iridescent films of iron oxides.
I can say that I have collected reference specimens with all kinds of hematite crystals, though not exceptional.

My research began in the late '80s.
In the past (90s) there were Saturday and Sunday morning excursions in Valle Giove, http://www.mindat.org/loc-50027.html.
Mainly Fluorite and Pyrite from here.
Sometimes there were guided tours of the Bacino Stope, http://www.mindat.org/loc-49837.html.
And yet I can honestly say that most of my samples come from the dumps, just over the town .
Here you could (and perhaps still can) get samples even if rusted and oxidized: what is important is that the crystals are intact. If so, you may proceed with cleaning by Hydrochloric Acid. I have always proceeded in this manner.


Let’s start with a seemingly irrelevant hematite stone, taken from the dumps (pic 1).
Observed under a 10x magnification loupe (pic 2, 3), and observed under the microscope (thin tabular hematite, FoV: 3.5 mm).

Pic 1
Pic 2
Pic 3
Pic 1
Pic 2
Pic 3
Pic 1
Pic 2
Pic 3




Over the years, however, I’ve found many beautiful things there.
All were cleaned with Hydrochloric Acid.

Largest Crystal Size: 1 cm
Largest Crystal Size: 1.5 cm
Largest Crystal Size: 1 cm
Largest Crystal Size: 1.5 cm
Largest Crystal Size: 1 cm
Largest Crystal Size: 1.5 cm


Another sample, two views.

4 cm x 3 cm x 2.5 cm
Pic 2
4 cm x 3 cm x 2.5 cm
Pic 2
4 cm x 3 cm x 2.5 cm
Pic 2


Here is another nice specimen. Honestly, I do not remember where I found it. Size 5 cm x 4 cm x 6 cm.



This is probably the specimen I like the most. Largest Crystal Size: 2.5 cm.



These samples are from Bacino stope. The last is a gift from a friend of mine.

6 cm x 7 cm x 8 cm
FoV: 30 mm
One Euro cent added for comparison
6 cm x 7 cm x 8 cm
FoV: 30 mm
One Euro cent added for comparison
6 cm x 7 cm x 8 cm
FoV: 30 mm
One Euro cent added for comparison


Other, 6 cm x 7 cm x 11 cm.



Detail of the previous sample. Largest Crystal Size: 1.5 cm.



Detail of iridescent hematite, Bacino stope, Field of View: 2.4 cm.



This comes from an old Rio Marina collection. Gift of a friend of mine. "Historical sample" from Bacino stope.

Crystal Size: 4 cm




Another place where I walked for a long time over the years is the beach of “la Cavina”, http://www.mindat.org/loc-252905.html.




A rounded stone taken from the sea, just opposite the beach.
Broken with the hammer.

10 mm x 8 mm x 6 mm
Crystals inside
FoV: 2 mm
10 mm x 8 mm x 6 mm
Crystals inside
FoV: 2 mm
10 mm x 8 mm x 6 mm
Crystals inside
FoV: 2 mm


And finally, a crystal habit which is typical of Rio Marina, but it is quite rare. Image area 6 mm x 8 mm.
(La Cavina beach).







Article has been viewed at least 1840 times.

Comments

Beautiful specimens Giuliano, thank you for posting the pictures.
Andrew

Andrew Debnam
12th Jul 2016 5:39pm
How interesting, a hematite beach! Thanks again for sharing.

Jim Bean
18th Jul 2016 10:28pm

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