Help mindat.org|Log In|Register|
Home PageMindat NewsThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusManagement TeamContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatSponsor a PageSponsored PagesTop Available PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on MindatThe Mindat Store
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryRandom MineralSearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
StatisticsThe ElementsMember ListBooks & MagazinesMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryHow to Link to MindatDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day Gallery

“Old Quarries” defined by Ernest Carlson, Minerals of Ohio (1991, 2015)

Last Updated: 16th Dec 2016

By Jamison K. Brizendine

There are several localities listed by Ernest Carlson (1991, 2015) with only a descriptor of “Old Quarry”, the goal of this exercise was an attempt to research these “mystery localities” and provide more accurate descriptions. This is the result of my research.




Old Quarry, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Calcite crystals in cavities of Columbus Limestone. Old quarry on west bank of Big Darby Creek, 2 miles north of Georgesville, Pleasant Township.
Mineral occurrence: Stauffer, 1909, p. 41-42
(Carlson, 1991, p. 90)

Original citation from Stauffer (1909):

The upper layers of the Monroe limestone show some signs of weathering, but there seems to be no conglomerate developed in the base of the Columbus limestone at this particular place, although on the west bank of the Big Darby, two miles above Georgesville, just north of the cottages on the A., C. and M. Eckles farm, it is nicely shown in an old quarry, of which the following is a section.

The first 10 feet, 4 inches, massive brown limestone containing a few corals of the genus favosites; and cavities, some of which are quite large, filled with crystals of calcite.
(Stauffer, 1909, p. 41-42)

A search yielded another source by Stauffer et al. (1911)

One of the best places for observing the conglomeratic phase of this horizon is along the Big Darby Creek, about two miles above Georgesville. Here on the west bank the Messrs. Eckles have opened a small quarry to supply a neighborhood lime-kiln, and have thus laid bare a small section of rock with an excellent exposure of the conglomerate. (Stauffer et al., 1911, p. 209)

Therefore the new name of the locality should be: A., C., and M. Eckles Quarry, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Florida, Henry Co., Ohio

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Calcite with pyrite in Dundee Formation or dolostones of Traverse Group. Old quarry along west bank of Maumee River a short distance SW of Florida, Flatrock Township.
Mineral occurrence: Stout, 1941, p. 399; Winchell, 1874, p. 417
(Carlson, 1991, p. 90)

Original citation from Stout (1941):

Rocks of the Delaware or Traverse formation extend in a belt from four to five miles in width diagonally across Henry County, mainly south of the Maumee River. It covers southeasetern Washington, northern and western Damascus, southeastern Harrison, northern Monroe, and central Flat Rock townships. The only exposures are along the Maumee River and described by Winchell (1874) as follows: “A short distance above Florida is a quarry in the left bank of the Maumee River. It consists of the following succession of parts:”

No. 1. Compact, blue limestone, very hard, showing few fossils, none of which are distinct. It contains considerable pyrites and calcite and some chert, 1 Foot, 2 inches

No. 2. Porous bluish or gray stone: fossils indistinct from crystallization and absorption; stone crystalline and hard, somewhat resembling the Niagara, 2 Feet

These beds lie nearly horizontal, but dip slightly into the river southeast, east, and northeast. Fifteen rods (?) further down the black shale (Ohio) is found in the river, making it impossible for more than 2 feet of shale (the representative of the Olentangy shale of Delaware County) to intervene between this stone and the overlying black shale
(Stout, 1941, p. 399)

Winchell's (1874) original entry describes the name of the quarry:

The details of the geology of Henry County are not well known. The rock exposures are confined to the bed and banks of the Maumee. It is only known that the formations of the Devonian make their way across the county from the north-east to the south-west, the south-eastern portion being taken up with the Waterlime. The exposures that occur in the Maumee are of the black slate or of the Hamilton, and are sufficient to fix pretty certainly the point of crossing of the strikes of those formations. With that exception, the accompanying map of the county is largely conjectural.

A short distance above Florida is the quarry of Wesley King and brother, in the left bank of the Maumee, it consists of the following succession of parts:

No. 1. Compact, blue limestone, the same as at Dilz’s quarry, in Defiance County; very hard, showing showing few fossils, none of which are distinct. It contains considerable pyrites and calcite and some chert, 1 Foot, 2 inches.

No. 2. Porous bluish or gray stone: fossils indistinct from crystallization and absorption; stone crystalline and hard, somewhat resembling the Niagara; crinoidal joints and Cyathophylloids, including a Cystiphyllum, can be identified, 2 Feet

These beds lie nearly horizontal, but dip slightly into the river southeast, east, and northeast. Fifteen rods further down the black shale (Ohio) is found in the river, making it impossible for more than 2 feet of shale (the representative of the Olentangy shale of Delaware County) to intervene between this stone and the overlying black shale
(Winchell, 1874, p. 417)

What is interesting about this occurrence is that the depth of this "quarry" is extremely shallow. There is no evidence of this "quarry" on topographic maps.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Wesley King Quarry, Florida, Henry Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Mason Township, Lawrence Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Six-inch layer of earthy red hematite at the base of sandstone underlying Brush Creek limestone, Conemaugh Group. Old quarry along Ohio Route 141, Section 19, N 1/2
Mineral occurrence: Condit, 1912, p. 74
(Carlson, 1991, p. 115)

Original citation from Condit (1912):

The village of Wilgus is situated in Section 19, Mason Township, in the valley of Long Creek, a tributary of Symmes Creek. The lowest stratum shown here is a massive sandstone, lying a little beneath the Brush Creek limestone, and at the Mason coal horizon. This rock has been quarried for road material along the pike near the north edge of Section 19. The lower portion is a quartz conglomerate, and at the base is a layer of earthy red hematite nearly six inches thick. (Condit, 1912, p. 74)

Note that Condit (1912) mentioned that the rock had been quarried for road material, but doesn’t state an existence of an actual quarry in the area. In all likelihood, the rock was excavated from an exposed outcrop or a cut that had been exposed after the "pike" had been constructed. You can still see these outcrops quite easily in Google Street View along Ohio Route 141 near Wilgus.

Furthermore, using available historical maps, I was unable to find any old quarries or pits. The oldest topographic map of this area that I could find dated back to 1908.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Ohio Route 141 roadcut, Wilgus, Mason Township, Lawrence Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Bellefontaine, Logan Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Calcite crystals in cavities of Lucas Dolomite and Columbus Limestone. Old quarry west of Bellefontaine, Section 5, SE 1/4, Harrison Township
Mineral occurrence: Moses (1922) p. 11 and Stout (1941) p. 249-252
(Carlson, 1991, p. 92)

Original citation from Moses (1922):

The Detroit River or Upper Monroe is represented in the area by the Lucas dolomite, its highest member. In five widely separated localities where the Monroe was directly underlying the Columbus carried fossils the fauna was found to be that of the Lucas. These localities are so distributed that one may decide that the Lucas exists as a narrow band around the border of the outlier at least as far south as West Liberty. The Lucas is commonly a compact, thin bedded, drab to gray dolomite. It is usually banded, contains some chert, and locally, as at the quarry at Bellefontaine, contains calcite crystals in cavities and imbedded in the rock. (Moses, 1922, p. 11)

I decided first to do a simple search of “Bellefontaine and Quarry” in the document, which gave me the information that I was looking for.

The quarry of the Niagara Stone Products Company at Bellefontaine is the most extensive producer of limestone. The chief product is crushed stone for railroad ballast and concrete work, but flux stone is also produced and shipped to Canton and Youngstown. The Company is now preparing to produce agricultural ground limestone which should be of a good grade since the limestones of this region have a high neutralizing power. (Moses, 1922, p. 84)

An earlier passage further confirmed the entry above:

In the western part of Bellefontaine, south of the Toledo and Ohio Central Railway the following section is exposed in the quarry of the Niagara Stone Products Company. (Moses, 1922, p. 26)

For consistency here is the entry taken from Stout (1941):

In the Bellefontaine district of Logan County the rocks of the Detroit group are well described by Moses (1922): The Detroit River or Upper Monroe is represented in the area by the Lucas dolomite, its highest member. In five widely separated localities where the Monroe was directly underlying the Columbus carried fossils the fauna was found to be that of the Lucas. These localities are so distributed that one may decide that the Lucas exists as a narrow band around the border of the outlier at least as far south as West Liberty. The Lucas is commonly a compact, thin bedded, drab to gray dolomite. It is usually banded, contains some chert, and locally, as at the quarry at Bellefontaine, contains calcite crystals in cavities and embedded in the rock. (Stout, 1941, p. 249)

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Niagara Stone Products Co. Quarry, Bellefontaine, Logan Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Silica, Lucas Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Crystals of calcite in cavities of dolostones of Detroit River Group. Old quarry, 2 miles North of Silica, Sylvania Township.
Mineral occurrence: Carman, 1922, p. 128
(Carlson, 1991, p. 92)

Original citation from Carman (1922):

Two miles north of Silica a quarry, exposing the same horizons as at Silica, shows this same cavernous zone with crystal lined cavities. A fine grained clay was observed in the cavities at 8 feet below the rock surface and a workman reported that they had found some very tough and sticky clay in the cavities of this zone at 15 feet below the rock surface. This clay is undoubtedly of the same type and origin as that at Silica. (Carman, 1922, p. 128)

Using Google Earth and historical topographic maps, I found the approximate location for the village of Silica, then drew a 2 mile line north from that point. Two miles north of this point is the former Centennial Quarry. The Centennial Quarry was operated many years ago by the Toledo Western Electric Railroad, which used crushed Detroit River rocks for building road beds. The quarry was abandoned in the 1920s. (Kesling, 1978).

The quarry today has been re-purposed as a swimming hole with scuba diving platforms, currently operated by the Sylvania Recreation Corporation. An outdoor terrace and stage were later constructed at the site and now annual concerts are held here every summer.

Also the locality should be a sub-locality of Sylvania, not Silica.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Centennial Quarry, Sylvania, Lucas Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Allen Township, Ottawa Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Celestite in Lockport Dolomite. Old Quarry, Section 2, Allen Township
Mineral Occurrence: Carlson (1983, p. 425, 429-430) and Sparling (1965), p. 172
(Carlson, 1991, p. 98)

I did not have access to either Sparling (1965) or Carlson (1983), so the only lead I had is the BLM Township and Range aliquots provided by Carlson (1991). Allen Township is located on the northwest corner of Ottawa County, with Wood County to the west and Lucas County to the north.

Section 2, NE ¼ in historic aerials and topographic maps reveal a very deep topographic low near the village of Williston, Ohio. This depression is the only major topographic feature in Section 2 and was obviously an old quarry. A topographic map in 1938 reveals that this pit was filled in with water, but a 1935 map showed a rail siding that was connected to the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railroad (now operated by Norfolk Southern). A 586 contour elevation encircles the quarry with a general 600 foot contour around the pit.

I was able to find a list of Ohio quarries operating in the 1898 - 1900s that was given by the Chief Inspector of Mines to the 73rd General Assembly of Ohio. There were 11 operating quarries in Ottawa County, but only 1 quarry, the Duncan and Buzzard Quarry had a postmark address in Williston, Ohio (Haseltine, 1898, p. 646). I then did a background search of "Duncan and Buzzard" and found the following passage from the commemorative biographical record of the counties of Sandusky and Ottawa:

In 1892 Mr. Duncan went into partnership with L.W. Buzzard, erecting a large lime plant which they operated together until 1894, at which time they erected a plant at Williston, Ottawa County, for manufacturing lime, crushing stone and furnishing building stone. These two plants they now keep in constant operation, his partner having the oversight of the new one, while Mr. Duncan himself looks after the business at Limestone (1896).

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: J. Duncan and L.W. Buzzard Quarry, Allen Township, Ottawa Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Charloe, Paulding Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Crystals of orange calcite in cavities of dolostones of undifferentiated Salina Group. Old quarry south of mouth of Blue Creek on west side of Auglaize River about ½ mile south of Charloe, Brown Township.
Mineral occurrence: Winchell, 1874, p. 340, 382
(Carlson, 1991, p. 94)

Original citation from Winchell (1874):

The Onondaga Limestone -- This is the lowest member of the Corniferous group in Ohio. It outcrops further up the Auglaize than the last described, and is burned for lime by Frank McEvoy, Section 5, SE ¼, in Brown township. The beds are thinner than where exposed at a lower horizon. These heavier magnesian beds are quarried, in connection with the Oriskany, at Charloe, including also seom of the upper layers of the Waterlime. The river here is thrown into a long series of rapids in passing these more persistant beds. This quarry is south of the mouth of Blue Creek, on the west side of the Auglaize, and shows, according to the statement of the proprietors, the following thickness for the several members

Section at Charloe.

No. 1. Sandstone, having the appearance of that at Grand Rapids, in Wood County; hard; suture-joined upon No. 2; sawn off for flagging; seen only; 6 inches

No. 2. Even-grained, magnesian limestone, of a buff color; containing nodules of chert; sawn into handsome building blocks; and exported largely; 4 feet

No. 3. Dark drab; soft; magnesian, with some cavities, which contain straw-colored calcite; 1 foot, 10 inches

No. 4. Rough; blue drab; close-grained, heavy, and hard, or brecciated and vesicular; with some pyrites; in one bed of at least; 3 feet, 6 inches

Total Depth: 9 feet, 10 inches

Of this section, No. 1 of this section is the base of the Oriskany; No. 2 is a stone seen at other places embraced with the Onondaga limestone; Nos. 3 and 4 are the uppermost members of the Waterlime. (See Geology of Wood County.)
(Winchell, 1978, p. 340)

And the second citation from Winchell (1872):

The section exposed at the quarry of the Delphos Stone and Stave Company, half a mile south of Charloe, in Paulding County, is as follows, in descending order. It covers the lower part of the Oriskany phase, embracing also the top of the Waterlime:

No. 1. Sandstone, having the appearance of that at Grand Rapids, in Wood County; hard; suture-joined upon No. 2; sawn off for flagging; seen only; 6 inches

No. 2. Even-grained, magnesian limestone, of a buff color; containing nodules of chert; sawn into handsome building blocks; and exported largely; 4 feet

No. 3. Dark drab; soft; magnesian, with some cavities, which contain orange-colored calcite; 1 foot, 10 inches

No. 4. Rough; blue drab; close-grained, heavy, and hard, or brecciated and vesicular; with some pyrites; in one bed of at least; 3 feet, 6 inches

Total Depth: 9 feet, 10 inches

No. 1 of this section is the base of the Oriskany; No. 2 is a stone seen at other places embraced with the Lower Corniferous; Nos. 3 and 4 are the uppermost members of the Waterlime.
(Winchell, 1978, p. 382)

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Delphos Stone and Stave Co. Quarry, Charloe, Paulding Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarries, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Crystals of colorless to light-brownish-yellow calcite in cavities of Lockport Dolomite or Greenfield Dolomite. Also celestite, dolomite, fluorite, galena, sphalerite, and sulfur. Old quarries at Tiffin, Clinton Township.
Mineral occurrence: Winchell, 1873, p. 616-618; also unpublished information from mineral collection at Heidelberg College.
(Carlson, 1991, p. 95)

Original citation from Winchell (1873):

The green shale, which, in Sandusky County, represents the Salina, has nowhere been seen in Seneca County. The only place within the county where the “junction” of the Niagara and Waterlime has been observed, is in the quarries at Tiffin. Within the corporate limits, a few rods above the swing bridge for the highway crossing, a quarry has been opened in the left bank of the Sandusky, which may be designated “Quarry No. 1”. The Niagara here shows in a broad surface exposure, over which the river spreads, except in its lowest stage. The quarry has not penetrated it, but the overlying Waterlime beds have been stripped off, showing a section of twelve feet in their beds belonging to phase No. 3. This lies conformably on the Niagara, so far as can be seen, the separating surface presenting no unusual flexures of irregularities. The only trace of the Salina is in the tendency of the color and texture of the Niagara toward those of the Waterlime, visible through its last three or four inches. It is blueish-drab, porous, crystalline, with some indistinct, greenish lines and spots. It contains much calcite and galena. From this character it passes immediately into a bluish-gray crystalline rock, in thick, firm beds, with spots of purple, heavy and slightly porous, the cavities nearly all filled with calcite.

The principle exposures of the Waterlime are in the quarries at Tiffin:

Section of Quarry No. 1, in descending order.

No. 1. Waterlime in thin, drab beds, like the Fremont quarries of June and Quilter. Exposed, 12 feet

No. 2. Porous, bluish-drab, with greenish streaks, containing much calcite and some galena, 3 inches

No. 3 Firm, gray Niagara, in thick beds. Exposed, 1 foot

Quarry No. 2 is located a ¼ miles above the last, on the opposite or right bank of the river, and is known as the City Quarry. The dip is here SW six or eight degrees. Supposing the dip is uniform between Quarries Nos. 1 and 2, there must be an unseen interval of twenty-five or thirty feet of the formation separating them

Descending section of the Waterlime at Quarry No. 2, Tiffin

No. 1. Very compact; fine grained; in beds of six to thirty inches. The fracture is a brownish-drab, and weathers light drab; sometimes porous or brecciated, 8 feet, 4 inches

No. 2. Thin-bedded; more earthy; rough in patches, and feeling like a fine-grained sandstone. The general facies is like Nos. 3 and 7, 10 inches

No. 3. Very compact, fine-grained beds of one of two inches; broken; irregular; separated with bituminous films which weather first blue, then chocolate. The fracture is a brownish-drab, and weathers light drab. It is sometimes porous or slightly brecciated. When fine-grained and compact is shows acicular cavities, 2 feet, 2 inches

No. 4. Same as the last, except the beds are even, 1 foot

No. 5. Very compact; fine-grained; gray; crystalline with occasional amorphous cavities. In one bed, 1 foot, 2 inches

No. 6. Very compact and fine grained; in even beds of one to two inches. The separating bituminous films weather blue, turning to chocolate; the brownish-drab, fractured surface weathers light drab; in some places with fine acicular cavities, 2 feet, 3 inches

No. 7. Very compact and fine-grained; in beds of one to two inches in broken, irregular and lenticular; separated by bituminous films, which weather blue and then chocolate; fracture brownish-=drab ; weathering light drab; in some places with fine acicular cavities. This being the lowest exposed, it has been stripped of the overlying beds for the space of several rods. The exposed upper surface of the bedding is very uneven, being thrown into curious mound-like elevations of two to six or eight inches, and a foot to three feet across, which do not show any system of arrangement. Considerable bituminous matter is disseminated through them, no included in the texture of the rock, which is very hard and crystalline, but in thin films between the beds, or in irregular deposits within the little mounts, or about their peripheries. The laminations which from these mounds are thinner than the regular bedding, and are sometimes not more than half an inch thick. They never show concave surfaces upward (hence the mounds are not concretions) but variously modify and fit to each other like a quantity of semi-fused and inverted plates or watch-glasses, the bituminous matter acting as a cement, 2 feet

Total exposed, 17 feet, 9 inches

The characteristic fossil, Leperditia alta, may be seen in nearly all parts of this section, but it was especially noted in Nos. 3 and 7. This rock is all hard and crystalline, but with a fine grain. No. 3, without careful examination, might be mistaken for Niagara, if seen alone. When broken into fragments for roads, the color of the pile, weathered for a few months, is a pleasant, bluish-gray. Yet on close examination the blue tint vanishes, and the stone shows a drab, a dark or brownish drab, a black, and a bluish gray, (the last two only on the lines of the bedding,) depending on the fracture or surface examined.
(Winchell 1873, p. 616-618)

The first thing to note is that this is two separate quarries, lumped together on one Mindat page. Second is that finding any physical evidence of these quarries is extremely difficult, given that they are within the city limits and much building has been done within the past 90 years. I was able to find two sources which were useful: One was a book titled, A History of Seneca County, from the close of the Revolutionary War to July, 1880. (Lang, 1880) and the second was a historical map of the city of Tiffin, dated back to 1874; a year after Winchell’s research was published.

Lang's (1880) passage for the Tiffin quarries is nearly a word for word version of Winchell's paper (1873):

The green shale, which in Sandusky County represents the Salina, has nowhere been seen in Seneca County. The only place within the county where the junction of the Niagara and Waterlime has been observed, is in the quarries at Tiffin, within the corporate limits. A few rods above the iron bridge on Washington Street, a quarry has been opened on the left bank of the Sandusky which may be designated as Quarry No. 1. The Niagara shows in a broad surface exposure, over which the river spreads, except in its lowest stage. The quarry has not penetrated it, but the overlying water lime beds have been stripped off, showing a section of 12 feet in their beds, belonging to phase No. 3. This lies conformably on the Niagara, so far as can be seen, the separating surface presenting no unusual flexures or irregularities. The only trace of the Salina is in the tendency of the color and texture of the Niagara towards those of the water lime, visible through its last three or four inches. It is bluish-drab, porous, crystalline, with some indistinct greenish lines and spots. It contains much calcite, and some galena. From this character it passes immediately into a bluish-gray crystalline rock, in thick, firm beds, with spots of purple, heavy and slightly porous, the cavities being nearly all filled with calcite.

Quarry No. 2 is located a quarter of a mile above the last, on the right bank of the river, and is known as the city quarry. The dip here is southwest, six or eight degrees. Supposing the dip is uniform between quarries Nos. 1 and 2, there must be an unseen interval of twenty-five or thirty feet of the formation separating them. Total exposed, 17 feet, 9 inches.


The first quarry described by Lang (1880) is close to Washington Street and Water Street and the second quarry is located a quarter mile from the first quarry. I was able to find a few miscellaneous articles from the Tiffin Tribune, that mention a "city quarry", which is mostly likely Quarry No. 2 from Winchell (1873). The 1874 historical map did not label either of these two quarries mentioned.

I would also like to point out that Ernest Carlson (1991) mentioned that several other minerals including fluorite, sphalerite, galena, strontianite and sulfur were found at these two specific quarries in Tiffin. They may have been found in the third quarry (see the next entry) instead of these two quarries or another quarry that was dug after these two quarries shut down. Therefore I can neither prove or disprove that these minerals were found at these quarries without sources to back up this claim.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Quarry No. 1, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA and a new locality created for Quarry No. 2 (City Quarry), Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Sandusky River, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Calcite with celestite in cavities of Greenfield Dolomite. Old quarry along east bank of Sandusky River at south edge of Tiffin, Clinton Township.
Mineral occurrence: Winchell, 1873, p. 618
(Carlson, 1991, p. 95)

Original citation from Winchell (1873):

The river just in the southern limits of the city is flowing east. The rock can be followed along the same bank of the river eighteen or twenty rods from the foregoing quarry, and has an irregular surface exposure throughout that distance, with a continuous dip south-west. The rock then follows the bluff, which strikes across a patch of river bottom, and is not seen again until a mile further up the river. It is here quarried and burned into lime. The dip is in the opposite direct, that is, toward the north. This is quarry No. 3.

No. 1. Soft; drab; slightly porous, 1 foot

No. 2. Hard and close-grained; gray and drab, 1 foot, 2 inches

No. 3. Brecciated, (like Put-in-Bay Island,) with hard and soft; drab and dark drab; sometimes cavernous, with considerable calcite, and porous, 4 feet

No. 4. Hard; gray; porous, with celestine, 2 feet

No. 5. Very porous; soft; drab, 1 foot

No. 6. Hard; porous; dark drab, 1 foot

No. 7. Soft; drab; veined; in one bed, 2 feet, 4 inches

No. 8. Porous; gray and drab (mixed); with coarse, but firm texture, 1 foot, 3 inches

No. 9. Hard, drab beds, but porous, 2 feet

No. 10. Coarse, drab beds; porous; rather soft under hammer, 12 feet

Total: 27 feet, 9 inches

This rock is quite different in most of its external aspects from that described in the last two sections, and it probably overlies them. It is much more loose-grained and porous, and is almost without bituminous films. The beds are generally six to twelve inches, but sometimes three feet in thickness. It has more constantly the typical drab color of the Waterlime, and it shows, besides Leperditia alta, another bivalve like Atrypa sulcate, and a handsome species of Orthis, also a coarse Favositoid coral, all of which are often seen in the Waterlime.
(Winchell, 1873, p. 618)

The 1874 historical map that I was able to find showed an area labeled "Lime Kiln & Quarry", directly next to to a property belonging to J. Krupp to the west and W. Krupp to the north. The description provided by Winchell (1873) matches the location of the quarry on this map. The quarry was located southwest of Martha Street, right on the river.

Using Google Earth, the latitude and longitude of this quarry would have been: 41° 6'5.62"N, 83°11'10.54"W

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: J. Klupp and W. Klupp Quarry (Quarry No. 3), Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry (2), Sandusky River, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Crystals of calcite in cavities of Lockport Dolomite. Old quarry in east bank of Sandusky River, 2.5 miles north of Tiffin, Clinton Township.
Mineral occurrence: Cumings, 1930, p. 199-200
(Carlson, 1991, p. 95)

Original citation from Cumings (1930):

At the quarry in the east bank of the river, about two and one-half miles north of Tiffin, the dip is about 2 degrees toward the river (west). Here the floor of the quarry is massive, light blue brecciated rock, with many druses of well crystallized calcite. It is not certain that this is reef rock. (Cumings, 1930, p. 199-200)

The road running along the Sandusky River is North Township Road 73. Measuring an approximate 2.5 mile line north of the town of Tiffin, the approximate location is in Section 8 of Clinton Township. Using an old historic map of Clinton Township (1874), the property owner was J. Keller, though it is unclear from this map that a quarry was operational on his site.

Wilbur Stout (1941) visited the site in 1937 and published his findings:

The Niagara formation appears at the surface in the bed and along the banks of the Sandusky River north of Tiffin. The exposure offered fair conditions for sampling on the east bank of the stream at the bend of the river, in the southwestern part of the northeast quarter of Section 8, Clinton Township, Seneca County. The sample was taken September 1, 1937, by Wilbur Stout and Walter Stout.

Alluvium, 2 feet

Niagara Formation Dolomite, light gray, in general massive bedded, rather hard, open texture, well crystallized, few fossils. Sample 146, 15 feet.

As determined by calculation from the analysis (Stout), the mineral components in Sample 146 of 15 feet of the Niagara Formation on the Sandusky River is 99.48 percent dolomite.
(Stout, 1941, p. 347-348)

In this report, Stout (1941) neither comments on the existence of a quarry, nor does he make an observation of calcite crystals in the vicinity. It is also plausible that Cumings (1930) mistook this rock outcropping as a historical quarry.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: Niagara Formation outcrop, Sandusky River, Tiffin, Seneca Co., Ohio, USA




Old Quarry, Wooster, Wayne Co., Ohio, USA

Citation in Carlson (1991):

Calcite with galena, pyrite, and sphalerite in veins of ironstone nodules from shales of Wooster Shale Member, Cuyahoga Formation. Also aragonite. Old quarry east of County Road 22 behind City of Wooster Service and Maintenance Facility, Section 5, NE ¼, Wooster Township
Mineral Occurrence: Ver Streeg, 1940 p. 259
(Carlson, 1991, p. 96)

Original citation from Ver Streeg (1940):

Recently, while making a study of the sedimentary formations of Mississippian age, in a quarry located in the city of Wooster, Ohio, the presence of sphalerite and galena was discovered in a horizon within the Cuyahoga formation. These minerals occur as crystals in the shale or as filling or replacements of fossil forms such as crinoid stems or brachiopods. They are also present in fossiliferous concretions associated with iron pyrite and calcite. The sphalerite is much more abundant than the galena and appears to occur where fossils are numerous. The concretions are calcerous because of the abundance of the crinoid and brachiopod shells.

Near Marshallville, Ohio, in the railroad cut near that place, the Pottsville formation of lower Pennsylvanian age is exposed. In the shale beds occur numerous concretions, some of which, when broken, show sphalerite associated with iron pyrite, calcite and barite. These concretions are likewise fossiliferous.

There are other places in Ohio where sphalerite and galena occur in sedimentary rocks. These occurrences may have some value to students interested in the theories of the origin of sphalerite and galena ores, such as those of the upper Mississippian valley.
(Ver Steeg, 1940 p. 259)

Conrey (1921) had visited the site earlier noting:

On the east side of Killbuck Valley one of the best known exposures of the Black Hand member is in the shale pit of the Medal Paving Brick Company in Section 5, Wooster Township. A section showing the beds exposed there follows:

Section measured in the shale pit of the Medal Paving Brick Company

Drift, 2 to 6 feet

Logan Formation:
Byer Member.
7. Fine-grained, grayish-buff sandstone. Much displace by ice shove, 2 feet

Berne Member.
6. Conglomerate with pebble 1/8 inch to ¼ inch in diameter. Much broken and displaced, 1 foot

Cuyahoga Formation
Black Hand Member.
5. Coarse, yellowish-brown sandstone, 10 feet

4. Grayish, sandy shale, blue, 8 inches

3. Fine-grained, brown sandstone in beds of 1 ½ to 6 inches, 6 feet

2. Grayish-blue shale, with fine-grained, thin-bedded sandstone. Lower limit rather indefinite, 5 feet

1. Dark Grayish-blue shale, containing a few layers of fossiliferous ironstone concretions, also thin fossiliferous, calcerous layers, 33 feet, 3 inches
(Conrey, 1921 p. 62)

Since the pit is now belongs to the City of Wooster, the locality name should be reflected as to the current owner.

Therefore the new name of this locality should be: City of Wooster Service and Maintenance Facility Quarry (Medal Paving Brick Co. Quarry), Wooster, Wayne Co., Ohio, USA




I would like to thank Dr. Mark Manley at Kent State University for providing me a copy of Kesling's (1978) paper.

References Cited:

Carlson, E.H. (1983) The occurrence of Mississippi Valley-type mineralization in northwestern Ohio, in Kisvarsanyi, G., Grant, S.K., Pratt, W.P., and Koenig, J.W.. Proceedings, International Conference on Mississippi Valley Type Lead-Zinc Deposits: University of Missouri-Rolla: 424-435

Carlson, E.H. (1991) Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Bulletin 69: 155

Carlson, E.H. (2015) Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Bulletin 69, second edition: 290

Carman, J.E. (1922) Some sub-surface rock channels and cavities filled with glacial material. Ohio Journal of Science: 22: 125-128

Condit, D.D. (1912) Conemaugh formation in Ohio. Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Bulletin 17: 363

Conrey, G.W. (1921) Geology of Wayne County. Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Bulletin 24: 155

Cumings, E.R. (1930) Silurian reefs near Tiffin, Carey and Marseilles, Ohio. Proceedings of the Indiana Academy of Science: 39: 199-204

Haseltine, R.M. (1898) Twenty-third annual report of the chief inspector of mines to the governor of the state of Ohio for the year 1897. Office of the Chief Inspector of Mines: 23: 339

Kesling, R.V. (1978) Strata of the Middle Devonian Silica Formation. Field Excursions, University of Michigan: 1-33

Moses, C.F. (1922) The geology of the Bellefontaine outlier. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, M.S. thesis (unpublished): 265

Sparling, D.R. (1965) Geology of Ottawa County, Ohio. The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, Ph.D. dissertation (unpublished): 265

Stauffer, C.R. (1909) The Middle Devonian of Ohio. Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Bulletin 10: 204

Stauffer, C.R., Bownocker, J.A., Hubbard, G.D. (1911) Geology of the Columbus Quadrangle. Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Bulletin 14: 167

Stout, W.E. (1941) Dolomites and limestones of western Ohio. Ohio Division of Geological Survey, Bulletin 45: 230

Winchell, N.H. (1873) Reports on the geology of Sandusky, Seneca, Wyandot and Marion Counties. Ohio Division of Geological Survey: 1(1): 591-645

Winchell, N.H. (1874) Reports on the geology of Ottawa, Crawford, Morrow, Delaware, Van Wert, Union, Paulding, Hardin, Hancock, Wood, Putnam, Allen, Auglaize, Henry, Mercer and Defiance Counties. Ohio Division of Geological Survey: 2(1): 227-438

Ver Steeg, K. (1940) Sphalerite and galena in sedimentary rocks in Ohio. Science: v. 92: 259

Various authors (1896) Commemorative biographical record of the counties of Sandusky and Ottawa, Ohio: containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens, and of many of the early settled families. J.H. Beers & Company, Chicago, Illinois: 452




Article has been viewed at least 994 times.

Comments

I took my wife to centennial a few years back. I had recalled going to "Fossil Park" in Sylvania around 2003 or spring 2004 for my paleontology class. We had gone to collect fossils and see how many different types we could find. It was easily accessable and large from what I remember.

We were able to crawl and climb around on large slabs of limestone and hammer out what we could. I found a large piece of cephalopod that would have been used to make it float or sink and move around. Some pyirtized fossils were found on the trip too.

Back to a few years ago we had seen a concert at the pavillion and recalled collecting at tr he fossil park. We decided we'd come back another time in better weather. We did as planned and were greatly disappointed. The quarry seems it may have been partly filled. The walls are fenced off and the floor where people walk is nicely even and seems like clay. A display gives some geological and or historical info and how exciting it is to find your own prehistoric fossils!

Remember the clay floor? You must poke around in that for your fossils. There wasnt much rock at all to poke or hammer at. We decided to walk on the trail and see if any lime could be spotted thru the brush. I didn't see anything and we left. It is a rather pointless place now and much better fossil collecting can be done down by dayton and caesars creek state park.

I am sure they are likely the same places as I couldnt find any other "fossil park" in the area.

Good work on your research and sorting out of other unknown quarries.

Matt Neuzil
17th Dec 2016 8:07pm
I took my wife to centennial a few years back. I had recalled going to "Fossil Park" in Sylvania around 2003 or spring 2004 for my paleontology class. We had gone to collect fossils and see how many different types we could find. It was easily accessable and large from what I remember.

We were able to crawl and climb around on large slabs of limestone and hammer out what we could. I found a large piece of cephalopod that would have been used to make it float or sink and move around. Some pyirtized fossils were found on the trip too.

Back to a few years ago we had seen a concert at the pavillion and recalled collecting at tr he fossil park. We decided we'd come back another time in better weather. We did as planned and were greatly disappointed. The quarry seems it may have been partly filled. The walls are fenced off and the floor where people walk is nicely even and seems like clay. A display gives some geological and or historical info and how exciting it is to find your own prehistoric fossils!

Remember the clay floor? You must poke around in that for your fossils. There wasnt much rock at all to poke or hammer at. We decided to walk on the trail and see if any lime could be spotted thru the brush. I didn't see anything and we left. It is a rather pointless place now and much better fossil collecting can be done down by dayton and caesars creek state park.

I am sure they are likely the same places as I couldnt find any other "fossil park" in the area.

Good work on your research and sorting out of other unknown quarries.

Matt Neuzil
17th Dec 2016 8:54pm

In order to leave comments to this article, you must be registered
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2017, except where stated. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: May 30, 2017 08:28:11
Go to top of page