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Greater Detroit Gem and Mineral Show, Oct. 10 thru 12, 1975

Last Updated: 3rd Dec 2017

By Larry Maltby

Minerals displayed by Cranbrook Institute of Science. Unfortunately, the label for the azurite was over exposed and unreadable so it was removed from the photo.


Minerals displayed by Cranbrook Institute of Science.


Minerals displayed by Cranbrook Institute of Science.


Minerals displayed by Cranbrook Institute of Science.



David Wilber brought the “Sea Horse” nugget back to Detroit but this year it was flanked by a large gold nugget from Alaska and a specimen of leaf gold from California.


The Julian Armstrong collection



My notes state that the following 12 specimens were displayed by Julian Armstrong. At the time I remember inquiring about Julian Armstrong and was told that he or she was an extended family member of the founder of the Armstrong Flooring Company but I have been unable to find a written record to confirm that.

While checking the Mineralogical Record Biographical Archive I came across a reference to Pauline Armstrong, a well-known collector of fine minerals, who was active in the 1970’s. After her first husband passed away she married a Julian Armstrong in 1965 who was also interested in minerals. The biography mentions that she acquired a suite of world class minerals from Tsumeb. The azurite shown below would fit that bill. Also mentioned is the fact that she purchased many specimens from Richard Kosnar who would be a reasonable source for the striped microcline from Colorado.

In the interest of mineral collecting history, If you have information that would clear this up please post a message below and I will make the appropriate edits.

















During the 1970’s the Headley-Whitney Museum of Art, Lexington, Kentucky, brought works of art to various Gem and Mineral Shows. This work features antique Italian coral with diamonds and gold on a crystalized Sulphur specimen.


During the 1970’s the Headley-Whitney Museum of Art, Lexington, Kentucky, brought works of art to various Gem and Mineral Shows. This work features an ornamental stone carving combined with precious metals and jewels. Shown above is a gold Benin King on a Rhinoceros carved in Chloromelanite with rubies.

Chloromelanite is a dark green to black variety of jadeite. (Ref. Mindat)


This is a large branch of precious coral (Corallium rubrum) suitable for carving. Most of it is found in the Mediterranean Sea growing at depths of 10 to 300 meters. These large branches are significantly depleted at depths attainable by scuba divers. Large carvings in this material are usually antiques. When worldwide trade was finally established between the Native American silversmiths and European markets, large quantities of red precious coral was used as a contrasting color to the blue of turquois in Native American silver jewelry.

Photo, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, public domain.
This is an antique carving in precious red coral displayed by the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, Elmhurst Illinois.


This is an antique carving in precious red coral displayed by the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, Elmhurst Illinois.


The jeweled elephant displayed by the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art, Elmhurst Illinois.


Carving by Donald Diller, Fort Wayne, Indiana.




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