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Micro-mineralogy of a single Keokuk geode; how complex can it get?

Last Updated: 24th Nov 2019

By Kevin Conroy

The following text and slides were all authored by Nova Mahaffey and Robert Finkelman, both from the University of Texas at Dallas, and are used with permission by Robert Finkelman.

The geode was found at Jacob's Geode Mine, Hamilton, Illinois, USA. The number of minerals present in this geode is amazing! Although tentatively identified, it is also likely that this is the first reported occurence of halite, sylvite, hollandite, ponite, feldspar and an unidentified REE carbonate mineral in a geode from the Hamilton, Illinois area.

The abstract and slides are from a presentation by Nova Mahaffey and Robert Finkelman at the AAPG SWS Convention held in Dallas, Texas from April 6 - 9, 2019.



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