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K2

Posted by Steve Hardinger  
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Steve Hardinger September 20, 2013 07:07PM
A number of people claim that the blue material in the lapidary rough called K2 is azurite. This makes no sense to me. Has it been verified by chemical analysis? If the analytical work has been done, can someone point me to the published report?

People who work this material tell me the blue of equal hardness with the matrix, an observation that is inconsistent with azurite. Lazulite, lazurite or blue sodalite make more sense to me.

Comments?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/20/2013 07:13PM by Steve Hardinger.
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Leor Goldberg September 21, 2013 01:20AM
I've not seen any formal analysis, though I do recall lazurite being thrown around as a possibility. I just did some quick research and this came up: http://www.etsy.com/listing/154264117/blue-moon-k2-blue-100-natural-hand-cut Looks like they are getting some analyzed. Granted they have a "healing" properties section and spelled x-ray incorrectly, but what they are suggesting makes sense. They think it is scorzalite, and after looking at it it looks awfully similar, right down to the matrix.
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Steve Hardinger September 21, 2013 02:10AM
That makes some sense, given the analytical data I've seen.
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Doug Daniels September 21, 2013 03:14AM
Strange how it is perfectly circular in all the specimens, and retains all the characteristics (except color) of the surrounding material.
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Steve Hardinger September 21, 2013 04:27AM
I don't think it's dyed.
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Ralph Bottrill September 21, 2013 05:49AM
From the etsy pictures given, if it's not dyed or somehow irradiated I will eat my hat!

Regards,
Ralph
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Doug Daniels September 21, 2013 07:00AM
They better have a good explanation of how the x-ray data was obtained, assuming it appears. Like, photos of the specimen analyzed, how the sample was extracted, and so forth. Interesting that the attribute for azurite (the first ID) is "physical awareness"...we want to be physically aware of what it is, mayhaps?
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Donald Peck September 21, 2013 04:54PM
I am with Ralph. Those circles look as though they are painted on common granite. The granitic structure is even apparent within the circles.
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Stephanie Martin September 21, 2013 05:18PM
I think it is natural, polishing it brings out the intense colour, they do resemble azurite suns but until testing confirms it is just a guess, although scorzalite does seem to be a better fit.

Check out photos of rough:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/K2-blue-jasper-pakistan-7-78-lbs-/171121424645?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27d7a1b905

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/K2-blue-jasper-pakistan-3-28-lbs-/300957958506?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item46127e016a

regards,
stephanie :))
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Rob Woodside September 21, 2013 05:45PM
Sure looks like blue ink.
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Stephanie Martin September 21, 2013 06:21PM
Look at these photos of rough, photo 3 and 4 clearly show raised surface aggregates of the blue material in host.

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/K2-blue-jasper-from-pakistan-2-10-lbs-/300957809750?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item46127bbc56

regards,
stephanie :-)
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Franz Bernhard September 21, 2013 06:30PM
The cab is a fine grained granitic rock througout for sure! However, the blue dots could be ink or some kind of natural impregnation, e.g. around a weathered primary copper mineral.

I had a somewhat similar specimen about 15 years ago. A friend showed gave me a slab of a fine grained, white gneiss from Hohe Tauern, Austria, with blue spots, which he believed to be lazulite. However, they were imprägnations of a copper mineral, most probable azurite (only Cu detected on grain boundaries with SEM-EDS).

"photo 3 and 4 clearly show raised surface aggregates of the blue material in host"
They appear to me to be just random elavations.

Franz Bernhard
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Stephanie Martin September 21, 2013 06:47PM
yes, exactly, not dyed or inked.

and at least we know they are NOT mythical blue garnets ;-)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/21/2013 07:42PM by Stephanie Martin.
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John Oostenryk September 22, 2013 12:14AM
Hello all!

Before this thread goes futher astray from Steve's analysis data inquiry... He is NOT saying anything is fake or contrived!

As he points out he isn't questioning that~. Several others(and myself) do not see fakery(ink whatever...)

I do not know the Etsy person Leor listed first, but I AM familiar with the ebay seller (Stoneclouds) that has been referenced further down this post. He is an experienced lapidarist and I will vouch for his input. I contacted him to request his commentary on cutting/crossection.

Please consider I invited him as a guest for polite comment RE: cross section appearance when he is cutting. (ie:that it is sound/not contrived)
I am hopeful he can/will post a pic or piclink to a rough edge oblique view so a cross-section is observable. That should help direct this thread back on track topically:)

Ralph~ I know you are sharp cookie and enjoy your knowledge contributions! However, today;),I would surely say goodbye to your hat-EXCEPT, you are probably safe as your comment was in regard to the "polished" piece. Unless someone buys it for destructive testing? (Do you have enemies or ornery friends watching your posts? LOL:) I trust you enjoy some humor!

Anyhoo-back on topic- Wish I could answer the original request beyond passing messages...

I do agree that hopefully there will be a reputable testing source attached to the pending XRD indicated on the Etsy page:)-
Patience and time will tell.
Best regards,
JO:)
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Doug Daniels September 23, 2013 02:39AM
Looking at the photos of the rough, it does seem to be natural. Again, a true analysis of it would be nice, if only to shut us "experts" up.....:-S It definitely isn't a jasper, as suggested on one of the sites; the matrix is too crystalline. And, all of the spots aren't spherical, some are a bit oval. But why does the underlying texture continue from not-blue into the blue.... An interesting beastie, to be sure.
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Steve Sorrell September 29, 2013 11:20PM
Ralph Bottrill Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> From the etsy pictures given, if it's not dyed or somehow irradiated I will eat my hat!

Let me know if you get a taste for those hard hats Ralph. Mine are probably outside their use by date now, and it is one way to recycle them!

:)-D

Regards
Steve
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Henry Barwood September 30, 2013 01:28AM
Been following this thread with interest. A simple acid test would eliminate azurite.The stuff looks like a granite with some sort of blue mineral that formed spherulites.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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Stephanie Martin September 30, 2013 04:38AM
FWIW

The seller of the rough pieces above indicates on his website that the material was tested, the matrix was identified as quartz, albite and microcline (black mineral not identified). No surprise there. Further the blue material was as follows taken verbatim from the website:

"The LAB has Identified the Blue Orbs as AZURITE, with Manganese, Titanium, Strontium, and Chromium, as Secondary Minerals of Concentration."

I inquired about the type of testing and if he could post it here, he replied he didn't have a copy of the results from the lab in England. He didn't really have time to discuss as he was leaving for a field/road trip and would not be back until Nov. So no luck pinning down the scientific data just yet.

Another seller offers that the material was tested by a certified gemologist (a gemologist!) and that the azurite has not oxidized and turned black due to the cool dry climate where it was discovered.

So looks like we have to wait a little longer to get published data.

regards.
stephanie :-)
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Harjo Neutkens September 30, 2013 08:49AM
" and that the azurite has not oxidized and turned black due to the cool dry climate where it was discovered."

????
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Stephanie Martin September 30, 2013 02:14PM
Yes Harjo, I agree, that's what I thought too. Some of the rough pieces have green patches which I suspect would be malachite, if anything.

regards,
Stephanie :-)
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Owen Lewis October 01, 2013 01:07AM
I'm going moonbeam-catching tonight. Anyone want to come?
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Stephanie Martin October 01, 2013 05:28AM
I'm in, if they are blue moonbeams. :-D
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Michael Hatskel October 01, 2013 08:49PM
Azurite in this material doesn't have much sense to me either.

One of the possibilities is that it is an amazonite-bearing granite and the blue grains are blue amazonite.
Such granites are known in Mongolia, China, and former Soviet Central Asia, in particular.
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Steve Hardinger October 01, 2013 09:08PM
To me, amazonite doesn't make sense. The color is much too azure, and the spot size too round and too regular.
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Steve Hardinger October 01, 2013 09:11PM
Perhaps I would be more convinced of the material's natural origins if there were pictures of the material in situ. All I've seen is cabbing rough or completed cabs.
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Michael Hatskel October 01, 2013 10:28PM
Steve,
I realize that it may be hard to believe that such blue, "green-free" amazonite can exist, but it does. I wish I had a picture to post as a proof, but I don't have a specimen in my collection - I just remember seeing them. Cool stuff!
Maybe Pavel Kartashov or someone else has one from Russia or Mongolia.

If you look at the ebay pics from the links provided in Stephanie's post of Sept 21, you may agree that the blue grains look like a rock-forming mineral grains, rather than the alteration product or the accessory mineral. The blue grains sitting on the edges of the rock pieces are especially interesting: you can see that they are translucent.
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Harjo Neutkens October 01, 2013 11:02PM
Something is very odd. The orientation of the mica seems to continue in the blue area the same way it does in the host rock. Similar to the "flow" of a schist or granite that continues its "flow" through a porphyroblast crystal. But, on the other hand the shape of these blue circles doesn't look like they could be porphyroblasts. It looks more like a dyed area than a porphyroblast. The only other viable explanation I have read here would be a secondary mineral formed around an ore crystal, or around the relics of one. On the pictures however there is nothing indicating an ore mineral or that one has been there before (oxidation tends to leave it's traces, in most cases not just the resulting mineral).
Looks dyed to me, but I can be wrong (and have been in many cases...)
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Steve Hardinger October 01, 2013 11:48PM
I didn't say blue amazonite was not possible. It certainly is possible, but how common is it? K2 is available in hundreds of kilos; I doubt blue amazonite of such very consistent color would occur anywhere in such quantity.
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Michael Beck October 01, 2013 11:53PM
I run a small lapidary and saw this material for the first time after Munich last fall. I have been wondering about this as well. I have cut 3 or 4 hundred cabs of this material in the past year and can attest to the fact that this is not dyed. I have been given the material in large pieces greater than 10 pounds and slabbed it. The orbs run through out in nowhere close to a consistent manner their are areas with orbs grouped together and areas with no orbs. I have seen a couple pieces where the color of the orbs grade to a blue green. This rough is going for well under 50 dollars a pound so its not particularly expensive stuff. The hardness is consistent throughout as well as the pattern of the underlying granite. The gentleman I am cabbing this for has had it tested twice I believe it was his test referred to in a previous post the one with the strontium and magnesium. I will be seeing him in the next few days and see if I can get the info from the testings. Thanks alot and have a great day everyone.
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Henry Barwood October 01, 2013 11:58PM
Strictly based on my experience with similar structures (not color) I will be very surprised if it is not an alkali granite or even a quartz syenite. The blue areas appear to be relict spherulitic xenocrysts. As to the color, could be just about anything.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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Steve Hardinger October 02, 2013 12:11AM
if someone will supply me with a sample or two of authentic K2, I'll foot the bill for analysis at a reputable service, and report the results here.
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Michael Beck October 02, 2013 12:17AM
Heres a photo of the pieces I'm working on right now. I will also post some photos of the slabs when I'm done cutting them. There does seem to be some sort of sub metallic specks running through this material as well definitely not the biotite . My personal feelings on the subject are secondary staining from these sub metallic specks ( possibly chalcocite) but I'm just a rock cutter with a few 2and 3 hundred level geology courses under his belt.
open | download - 1380669376682.jpg (700.3 KB)
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Stephanie Martin October 02, 2013 12:26AM
Steve, if necessary I will send you a piece if we don't get a resolution here. I was thinking if getting it tested myself but not sure when I would get around to that.

regards,
Stephanie :-)
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Ibrahim Jameel October 02, 2013 01:08AM
The discussion may have already moved past this, but I just wanted to reiterate that the stuff is definitely not faked. I saw some in Skardu on a trip back in 2006-- a local dealer had a 2 foot boulder of the stuff, he just whacked off the corner and gave it to me-- sure enough it had the same blue spots. At the time they had no use for it (they were only looking for specimens) but it appears they found a way to market it....
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Dean Allum October 02, 2013 01:27AM
I've seen stuff like this before:
http://www.mindat.org/photo-354783.html

It is surprising that there are no signs of malachite.
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Michael Beck October 03, 2013 03:50AM
Photo of slabs
open | download - 1380768535482.jpg (338.9 KB)
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Stephanie Martin October 03, 2013 07:04AM
Hi Dean,

Yes I believe there are signs of malachite but it depends on the piece. There are some green edges on some of Michaels's slabs above. One of my pieces appears to be a weathered portion that shows green patches which I assumed were malachite. I finally had a chance to snap a couple photos. I haven't looked at them under the scope but I think I see some small sprays in the close-up.

overall slab approx. 9.0 x 8.0 cm


FOV aaprox 1.5 cm


regards,
stephanie :-)
open | download - P1430942(1).JPG (187.8 KB)
open | download - P1440042(1).JPG (252.5 KB)
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Harjo Neutkens October 03, 2013 08:12AM
After Michael and Ibrahims posts I stand corrected ;-) The presence of metallic crystals noted by Micheal explains a lot, and the rough seen by Ibrahim on the site explains the rest. Thanks!
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Michael Beck October 03, 2013 08:14AM
This is the green area taken through a 10x loupe on my phone at 2mp. Someone mentioned putting a loupe over a lens in some other thread. Thanks for the great idea.
open | download - 1380783875078.jpg (344.8 KB)
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Michael Beck October 03, 2013 08:32AM
This is the inside surface of the fracture from the previous slab the piece popped off maybe its helpful. It looks like standard malachite staining in a fracture. I really don't see to much of this on most of the material I cut but their it is anyways. I did not make it to the post office today Mr Hardinger but I will make sure I put this in as well.
open | download - 1380784567541.jpg (238.1 KB)
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Donald Peck October 03, 2013 04:33PM
Michael's and Stefanie's recent photos have made me revise my thinking. I now think the material is natural. Before, I was convinced it was a fake with dyed spots.
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Rob Woodside October 03, 2013 04:35PM
ditto
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Michael Hatskel October 03, 2013 04:50PM
While the former nonbelievers in large numbers are switching their opinions, could someone who has the stuff in their possession just find a moment to drop an acid on it and report if it will fizz or not? and/or report if a knife will scratch the blue spot or not? ;-)
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Stephanie Martin October 03, 2013 05:31PM
I'll try and scrape some off from an exposed fractured edge to test, but I won't be able to do it until much later today as I'm stuck at work for another 10 hours - so if someone else can do it sooner then go for it. I was reluctant to damage my pieces but I should be able to literally find a small spot to sacrifice.

regards,
stephanie :))
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Steve Hardinger October 03, 2013 11:19PM
People I've talked to who have worked this material tell me the blue grinds, cuts, and polishes the same as the white. In other words, the blue has the same hardness as the white. If the blue was azurite (or more precisely more than just an azurite stain) then it would wear away and become concave during polishing.
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Henry Barwood October 04, 2013 01:02AM
Dumortierite? Green may be a mica?

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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Steve Hardinger October 04, 2013 01:39AM
I don't think its dumortierite, because the blue spots do not have any fibrous character. In photos they sometimes appear a bit grainy, so I can understand why they might be compared to azurite 'blueberries', which are often grainy or sandy.
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Michael Beck October 04, 2013 02:05AM
This material is very consistent through out. I cut a great deal of the "coppers" and materials with varying hardnesses. It really seems like some sort of staining after the fact. The biotite specks are on both sides of the boarders of the blue orbs.
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Alfredo Petrov October 04, 2013 03:16AM
I have some blue japanese dumortierites that are so fine-grained that they look homogeneous, no fibrous structure visible, although I imagine it would be visible under a SEM.

I also have some granite from Antarctica with 3-dimensional copper staining - Either the granite is more porous than it looks, or the penetrative staining power of tiny amounts of secondary copper minerals is quite astonishing. Naturally, with staining like this, a lapidarist is not going to notice any hardness difference between the stained and unstained "feldspar".

So I fear none of the possibilities mentioned so far in this thread has been scientifically eliminated yet, and analyses will be required.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/04/2013 03:22AM by Alfredo Petrov.
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Steve Hardinger October 04, 2013 03:53AM
Alfredo, could you post pictures to enlighten the rest of us?
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Alfredo Petrov October 04, 2013 04:17AM
I will, Steve, although this topic may well have been concluded or died already when I get home to my collection (after Munich show).
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Stephanie Martin October 04, 2013 06:17AM
The material is very grainy as mentioned and I did not think a hardness test or acid test would really solve the issue but tried anyway. I managed to scrape some grains off to try some acid. It did not really scratch with a knife, but rather just loosened some grains. I put the scrapings in Muriatic acid and not too much happened, except that the colour washed out a bit. I did not see any dramatic fizzing but then many of the grains were small and may have not been big enough to notice a slight reaction. There seemed to be a slight haziness around the grains initially. The grains were still in the dish after the test meaning they did not dissolve.

here's a few more photos:







regards,
Stephanie
open | download - P1430957(1).JPG (196.3 KB)
open | download - P1430954(1).JPG (248 KB)
open | download - P1430996(1).JPG (237.3 KB)
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Henry Barwood October 04, 2013 01:12PM
Stephanie,

If you have a small piece you can send me, I will prepare a thin section and let you know what type of rock this is and make an attempt at identifying the blue material.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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Steve Hardinger October 04, 2013 02:39PM
Alfredo, I'm hoping the topic remains alive at least until I'm posted the analytical results. Haven't received a sample yet.
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Bill Cordua October 05, 2013 04:18PM
I ran a little experiment, as shown by the photos. I took several white granites and put on blue food color then spread it to look like a circular spots. The effects looked a lot like the K-2 material pictured. About an hour later I used my trusty hammer to break through one of the spots and found that the food color had penetrated about a centimeter into the granite, giving a 3-D stain (sorry about the focus). I know my material is a fake, and I suspect that on the market is too. With better techniques and more time I'm certain I can duplicate the results I've seen. Really never thought the textures and reported compositions made geological or geochemical sense.
open | download - DSCN1322.JPG (260.5 KB)
open | download - DSCN1324.JPG (254.6 KB)
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Steve Hardinger October 05, 2013 05:41PM
Bill, you've done the experiment I've been thinking about. Now what geological analytical technique would be used to prove that the blue spots is 'real' K2 are organic (food coloring) and not mineralogical?
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Bill Cordua October 05, 2013 07:12PM
Steve,
If you can see the original mineral textures beneath the blue - or whatever color - that's enough for me. For analytical proof, X-ray the blue stained feldspar and show it's still feldspar. - Bill
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Steve Hardinger October 05, 2013 07:34PM
I'm waiting to receive samples for analysis...
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Michael Hatskel October 05, 2013 08:30PM
Bill,
I would assume that the food colorant be extracted from the rock using the same solvent that was used in applying it (water or alcohol). Do you observe that?
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Bill Cordua October 05, 2013 09:23PM
Actually Steve it was food coloring right off the shelf from the grocery store. I just dropped some on and smoothed it out with a paint brush. Didn't take much food coloring either. I don't have the bottles at home to see if it says what the ingredients are. My sense in using this in the past (for many of my oceanography lab exercises) is that it doesn't come off with water very well. Hands at least. If I used red coloring and wasn't careful, my hands look like a prop from Carrie for a day or two.:-)
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CA October 05, 2013 09:47PM
If this material were dyed how would they be able to get the dye spots distributed thoughout the center of the rough. I've cut about 75 pounds of larger pieces into smaller, more saleable pieces and the blue balls, what ever they are, are distributed randomly thoughout the center of all of the material that I cut. Doesn't look dyed at all. That would be one neat trick to get the blue balls of dye deep into the rough.
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Alfredo Petrov October 06, 2013 01:45AM
X-ray won't help to determine whether a stain is natural or not. A tiny amount of azurite can stain a lot of rock in Nature, and XRD is just going to show the patterm of the groundmass feldspar, the azurite lost in the background noise. Inconclusive.

If it is just organic dye, could one test it with bleach?
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Henry Barwood October 06, 2013 02:09AM
I offered to prepare a thin section which would tell the petrology, mineralogy and condition of any staining, natural or human induced, but no takers. I am looking into purchasing a fragment on ePay and may just do it myself to settle this nonsense.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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John Oostenryk October 06, 2013 03:02AM
I just HAVE to say all this~ Others wondered the same thingS...

Uh - Bill C?
Did you actually check the pics here and on Ebay and elsewhere and REALLY look at them??
If faked, how do they get the spherical blue spots inside massive rough? On second thought- don't bother answering that, it is a waste of time.

I was amused by your attempting to fake a blue stain. Go ahead- see what you can create:)
However, until you have actually physically investigated the true material you have visually snap judged, you are doing science and yourself a major disservice declaring fraud via the failed reasoning process applied:(

Looking at something in a picture, then deciding to take a similar colored/textured rock (you don't know what the host material REALLY is either.)*
Next taking your closest convenient blue colorant. (Why not ink or paint-they are blue too?!)
Then imitating bad art and finally declaring the dissimilar result to be proof that your initial baseless claim is correct is just compunding bad to worse to worst...
Gadzooks! When you really look at your comparison, you have steaks and oranges, or somesuch, both food but that is it.
Nuff said, I will shut up now~

I DO look forward to lab results from one of the generous offers presented by our fellow members:) It IS mineralization, likely something simple, We should be so lucky if it is complex. Which = "even more interesting!"~lol)

*Thank you Henry for angling for thin section ID- Heck Yeah! Having experience doing that is awesome, you rock!:) I wish my petrology course hadn't been so short. Course, it was sorta painful too, so after wasn't all bad~LOL.
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Stephanie Martin October 06, 2013 04:40AM
Henry,

Sorry I couldn't respond sooner, I will send you a PM.

regards,
stephanie :-)
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CA October 06, 2013 04:46AM
Henry: What size piece do you need to make the thin section analyses? Let me know and email me your mailing address.
Regards,
Chris
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Michael Beck October 06, 2013 11:16AM
Mr Hardinger I apologize I'm at a show this weekend I'll get a piece in the mail first thing on Monday morning hopefully your tests can bring some actual scientific conclusions and not just baseless speculation.
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Bill Cordua October 06, 2013 02:26PM
To John and others,

Yes, I have looked at the photos, and they don't convince me. Next time I get to a rock show and I will be quite curious to see some " in person", as clearly a better alternative to seeing photos. I also look forward to thin section and other creditable analyses by someone like Henry. However I did prove that some granitic rock is porous enough to take a stain in 3-D using a common, readily accesible substance. I never said I had proved the K-2 material is a fake, merely voiced my suspicion based on my observations. As you all know there are a lot of modified, misrepresented and faked materials on the market today, so it makes sense to me to be skeptical. Caveat emptor.
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Rob Woodside October 06, 2013 07:06PM
Metallics, possibly chalcopyrite, have been observed in this granite. Both Blue and green, possible Cu, oxidation products have been observed. Bill has shown that granites are sufficiently porous to diffuse staining. So if a thin section showed chalcopyrite that hadn't completely oxidised we would have the explanation for these blue diffusions deep in the granite.
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Amanda Hawkins October 06, 2013 07:52PM
Doug Daniels Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
Interesting
> that the attribute for azurite (the first ID) is
> "physical awareness"...we want to be physically
> aware of what it is, mayhaps?


lost me

Amanda
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Harjo Neutkens October 06, 2013 11:38PM
Great! I think this topic is exactly what a mineralogy forum should be. People discussing, having second thoughts, people offering material to others for analysis. Combined effort and combined knowledge, great!
At the moment I'm putting my money on it being natural, despite my previous doubts. I can't wait to see the analysis results.

p.s. Amanda, I think nobody here cares about which moment you lost it.
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Doug Daniels October 07, 2013 12:02AM
Amanda - don't worry, poor attempt at a joke. Right now, I'm like the rest, waiting to see the results of the various analyses that may soon happen. Should be interesting.
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Amanda Hawkins October 07, 2013 09:08AM
:-)

Amanda
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Bill Cordua October 07, 2013 03:18PM
Rob's idea about alteration haloes around an accessory copper mineral has merit - the equivalent to oxidation-reduction halos we sometimes see in red bed sandstones involving iron oxides. I would think that the fluids causing the alteration would also cause alteration in the surrounding feldspars, a fact that should be visible in thin section.

Also, I noticed some vendors linking the K2 name with jasper! Ouch! Whatever this turns out to be - it is not jasper.
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Chester S. Lemanski, Jr. October 07, 2013 03:30PM
Please note that on the specimen photo Stephanie posted some time back (& up) in this thread, that the blue color is visible along the top surface of the piece and would appear linear versus spherical. Just another observation.
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Stephanie Martin October 07, 2013 05:46PM
Bill - we know it is not jasper, but they are calling it jasper to market it, obviously thinking this is a better marketing moniker than granite. As it stands it is tedious to google search for this material since there are so many hits with K2. I know they are trying to capitalize on the name but it just makes it harder to find.

Chet, I can assure you that they are not just on the surface, although in the photo it may appear that way.

regards,
stephanie :-)
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Henry Barwood October 14, 2013 04:25AM
I've received two pieces of the K2 material and will be preparing thin sections to determine what I can about this material. A couple of observations (at 30X):

Material appears to be a quartz-mica (muscovite) schist, rather than a granite. There are grains of "biotite" throughout. Likely some feldspar also.Won't be able to tell more until I can examine under a petrographic scope.

The green mineral is in flat flakes that do not show a pronounced cleavage, nor fibrosity as would be expected with malachite. Definitely occurs along fracture surfaces and is not dispersed within the sample.

The blue grains are translucent and contain some darker areas of blue internally. Could be a stain, but broken grains show a uniform blue color instead of a darker rim. The grains appear to be quartz and muscovite with a strange colorant.

The material does not appear to be a product of dispersed copper mineralization, but could be. For one thing, there is no accompanying Fe staining from something like chalcopyrite. There is also no evidence of significant weathering or hydrothermal alteration of the rock.

All in all an oddity.

Hope to have more information in a week or so.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
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Steve Hardinger October 14, 2013 04:54AM
Henry,

I have received a few samples of K2 for analysis, but if you'd like to take the lead, by all means please do so. You've more experience along these lines than I.

My samples do have some of the earthy, powdery green material. This material dissolves with effervesence in dilute HCl at room temperature, so I'm guessing it might actually be malachite.
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Henry Barwood October 14, 2013 12:25PM
Steve,

All I'm doing is some petrographic work. Please proceed with your analyses. Since this does appear to be some copper mineralization, I have to tell you that it is weird.

Henry Barwood
Troy University
Troy, Alabama USA
avatar
Steve Hardinger October 14, 2013 02:53PM
My SWAG for the green stuff malachite (definitely copper), but I don't believe the blue is a copper mineral. (I have a hunch but I'll keep that quiet until I'm proven wrong.) Will proceed with the analyses.
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