Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat Articles
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsThe ElementsUsersBooks & MagazinesMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day Gallery

Kim Macdonald's Photo Gallery

Ngatamariki Power Station

Ngatamariki thermal area, Wairakei, Taupo District, Waikato Region, New Zealand

At least from above, one of the most colourful power stations in the world, probably merely a sunlit optical illusion. Said to be the largest single binary power station in the world. Accesses the Ngatamariki geothermal field. Google Earth image.
Photo ID: 891454     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 41   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 1543 x 925 pixels (1.4 Mpix)

Clark and Firth Battery Site

Waiorongomai, Matamata-Piako District, Waikato Region, New Zealand

The concrete structure is for rock crushing for a local council quarry which operated in the 1920's. The crusher closed in 1927, having processed quartz rock. The structure had been built on the Clark and Firth battery site which closed in 1912.
Photo ID: 884958     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 32   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Craters of the Moon (from a distance)

Wairakei geothermal area, Wairakei, Taupo District, Waikato Region, New Zealand

An overview of the Craters of the Moon site. Geothermal activity started here in 1958, due to a nearby geothermal power station being established, and effecting the underground water dynamics. It contains hydrothermal eruption craters, fumaroles, and minor mud pools, but not the geysers, colourful sinter deposits, and other star attractions of some other geothermal fields in the region. The picture also shows the unique vegetation found in these geothermal areas, that can cope with the extreme conditions.
Photo ID: 881313     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 51   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Potahu Geyser

Te Puia, Rotorua District, Bay of Plenty Region, New Zealand

This is not taken when it erupts, which is apparently 30 metres high. At other times it hisses and spits. Reliably informed by the entrance staff while they were taking my money, the geyser erupts numerous times per day, I stood next to it for two hours, while the geyser acted like a diva and refused to perform. A watched pot never boils as Benjamin Franklin said.
Photo ID: 881312     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 26   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Lake Rotorua

Lake Rotorua Area, Rotorua District, Bay of Plenty Region, New Zealand

Around 200 000 years ago major volcanic eruptions caused the ground to collapse, forming a 16 kilometre wide caldera, now partly filled by Lake Rotorua. In the background is Mokoia Island, a rhyolite dome, formed later by slowly oozing lava in the caldera. In the foreground is part of the Ohinemutu Maori village, in particular the meeting house and 1914 St Faiths Church. Both are beautifully decorated with Moari carvings. This Maori village is occupied by the Ngati Whakaue tribe, and is the original settlement before all the tourists arrived. It is a 10 minute walk from downtown Rotorua. The village can be walked around for free, but please show respect, and be unobtrusive. Surrounding the village are hot springs and steam vents as can partly be seen in the photograph.
Photo ID: 880562     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 30   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Sugar Loaf Islands

Sugar Loaf Islands, New Plymouth, New Plymouth District, Taranaki Region, New Zealand

On a cold blustery winters day. Type locality for taranakite, a phosphate mineral formed from the interaction of clays and bird guano in damp conditions. The island to the right is Motumahanga, then to the left Moturoa, and the pinnacle on the mainland is Paritutu. Also seen is the power station chimney at the New Plymouth port. There are three other islands in the group not part of the photograph.
Photo ID: 879297     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 29   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Gemstone Beach Gold Placer Deposits

Gemstone Beach, Orepuki, Southland District, Southland Region, New Zealand

Gold and other treasures may at times be found along the beach which is open to the public. Maybe stay out of the mining claim though right next to the car park.
Photo ID: 874652     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 46   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Gemstone Beach

Gemstone Beach, Orepuki, Southland District, Southland Region, New Zealand

Photo ID: 874650     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 33   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Queenstown

Queenstown, Queenstown-Lakes District, Otago Region, New Zealand

Photo ID: 865799     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 27   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)

Arrowtown Chinese Settlement

Arrowtown, Queenstown-Lakes District, Otago Region, New Zealand

The Otago Provincial Government had encouraged Chinese miners to emigrate, after several fields became deserted after the 1862-1863 gold rushes. Miners had left for the newly discovered gold fields on the West Coast, which may have not been any better, but the grass is always greener.... Not everyone was happy with large numbers of Chinese arriving on the Otago gold fields. Most were from the Canton area. In some areas they consisted of about half the miners. They often took over abandoned claims from other miners, and many found little gold, or much money to send back to their families in China. A short walk from the main street in Arrowtown, are several stone cottages, hut ruins, old garden walls etc from the Chinese settlement here, with interpretative panels.
Photo ID: 865791     Uploaded by: Kim Macdonald   View Count: 30   Approval status: Public galleries    Type: Photo - 4928 x 3264 pixels (16.1 Mpix)
Page 1 of 158 (1 to 10 of 1578 total)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...

 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: June 25, 2019 09:12:40
Go to top of page