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Olympic Dam Mine, Roxby Downs, Stuart Shelf, South Australia, Australia

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 30° 26' 24'' South , 136° 52' 22'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): -30.44000,136.87278
GeoHash:G#: r496fdedn
Owned/operated by:BHP
Locality type:Mine (Active) - last checked 2018
Köppen climate type:BWh : Hot deserts climate


A very large operating copper-gold-uranium mine. The ore deposit is located on Roxby Downs Station, about 25 kilometres west of the opal mining town of Andamooka (265 km north of Port Augusta).

Australia's largest reserve of copper and uranium ore is at Olympic Dam. Some sources report it to be also the world's largest Uranium resource. It was discovered in 1975 as the result of a drilling program conducted by Western Mining Corporation Limited, targeting geophysical targets. The mine is currently operated by BHP Billiton.

The deposit is essentially a iron oxide rich megabreccia formed in a Proterozoic granite, and is considered to be a classic example of an IOCG (Iron oxide-copper-gold) deposit.

There are extremely large volumes of mineralised rock in the ore body but at present only about 450 million tonnes of ore has been proven. This contains about 11 million tonnes of copper, 360 000 tonnes of uranium oxide, 2700 tonnes of silver, and 270 tonnes of gold. The top of the deposit is about 350 metres below ground level, so did not outcrop and underground mining is necessary. The deposit itself is about 7 kilometres long and 4 kilometres wide. It is the largest copper ore body in Australia and one of the world's largest uranium deposits. The mine itself is the biggest long term development project in South Australia and more than one billion dollars was spent on establishing it: this includes the construction of the nearby town of Roxby Downs which is home to about 3500 people.

Mining started in June 1988. By March 1996 more than 8500 tonnes of uranium oxide had been produced along with 370,000 tonnes of copper, 66 tonnes of silver, and 5 tonnes of gold. In 1999-2000 Olympic Dam produced 4089 tonnes of uranium oxide achieving $895 million in export revenue. Just over half the uranium (55%) has been sold to power utilities in Europe, about a quarter to Japan, and the remainder to Korea (11%) and the United States (8%). Olympic Dam has an expected life of 200 years.

A resources update (Sept 2007) was 6.7 billion tonnes of ore @ 0.87%Cu, 0.29kg/t U3O8, 0.3g/t Au and 1.6g/t Ag. In 2012 there were smaller but higher grade estimated reserves of 2.95 billion tonnes of ore grading 1.2% copper, 0.04% uranium, 0.5 g/t of gold and 6 g/t of silver.[Wikepedia]

Types of uraninite: (1) primary, small, cubic crystals, with oscillatory and sector chemical zoning, defect-free structure, contains Pb(IV) and REE; (2) zoned, coarser, sub-euhedral; (3) "Cobweb", hexagonal-octagonal habit, defect-free structure, also contains Pb(IV) and REE, plus inclusions of galena, Cu-Fe sulfides, and minerals of REE; (4) dominant, massive, highest-grade, micro-grain to aphanitic, forming larger aggregates and vein fillings, lower in Pb and REE but enriched in Ca; product of post-1590-Ma dissolution and reprecipitation. The late uraninite is possibly hydrothermal and formed at relatively low temperatures, that is, less than 250oC.

Similar granite-related Proterozoic iron-oxide copper-gold deposits in this area of South Australia are Prominent Hill and Carrapateena.


Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List

Acanthite

Albite

Allargentum

Altaite

Anatase

Anhydrite

Anilite

Ankerite

Arsenic

Arsenopyrite

Baryte

Bastnäsite-(Ce)

'Biotite'

Bismoclite

Bismuth

Bismuthinite

'Blaubleibender Covellite'

Bornite

Brannerite

Britholite-(Ce)

Calaverite

Calcite

Carrollite

Cassiterite

Celestine

Chalcocite

Chalcopyrite

'Chlorite Group'

Clausthalite

Cobaltite

Coffinite

Coloradoite

Copper

Corundum

Covellite

Crandallite

Cuprite

Diaspore

Digenite

Djurleite

Dolomite

'Electrum'

Enargite

Erythrite

'Florencite'

Florencite-(Ce)

Fluorapatite

Fluorite

Galena

Goethite

Gold

Gypsum

Halite

Hematite

var: Martite

Hessite

Hydroxylapatite

Idaite

Ilmenite

Kaolinite

Kawazulite

Lavendulan

Löllingite

Magnetite

Manganosite

Melonite

Molybdenite

'Monazite'

Monazite-(Ce)

Muscovite

var: Sericite

Orthoclase

Petzite

Pyrite

Pyrrhotite

Quartz

Roxbyite (TL)

Rutile

var: Ilmenorutile

Safflorite

Scheelite

Schorl

Sellaite

Siderite

Silver

Sphalerite

Spionkopite

Stromeyerite

Strontianite

'Synchysite'

Synchysite-(Ce)

Tellurium

Tellurobismuthite

Tennantite

Tenorite

Tetrahedrite

Thorianite

Thorite

var: Uranothorite

Titanite

'Tourmaline'

Uraninite

var: Pitchblende

Volynskite

Wittichenite

'Wolframite'

'Xenotime'

Xenotime-(Y)

Zircon

Zunyite


95 valid minerals. 1 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Messinian - Lutetian
5.333 - 47.8 Ma



ID: 699396
Watchie Sandstone

Age: Cenozoic (5.333 - 47.8 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Watchie Sandstone

Description: Basal conglomerate, sand lenses, lower fine-grained sand, upward coarsening sand on top. Regressive lacustrine

Comments: sedimentary siliciclastic; synthesis of multiple published descriptions

Lithology: Sedimentary siliciclastic

Reference: Raymond, O.L., Liu, S., Gallagher, R., Zhang, W., Highet, L.M. Surface Geology of Australia 1:1 million scale dataset 2012 edition. Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia). [5]

Cambrian
485.4 - 541 Ma



ID: 3192994
Paleozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Cambrian (485.4 - 541 Ma)

Comments: Stuart Shelf

Lithology: Siltstone,conglomerate,shale,sandstone,limestone

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Roberts, D.E., Hudson, G.R.T., and Li, Z. (1984): The Australian Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au deposit. Geology and Prospecting 20(7), 32-37, 51 (in Chinese).
Mining Annual Review (1985): 369.
Econ Geol. (1992) 87:1-28
Econ Geol. (1995) 90:281-307
Lottermoser, B. G. (1995): Rare earth element mineralogy of the Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, Roxby Downs, South Australia; implications for ore genesis. Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Monatshefte 1995, 371-384.
McPhie, J., Kamenetsky, V. et al (2011) Origin of the supergiant Olympic Dam Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, South Australia: Was a sedimentary basin involved? Geology, published online, https://eprints.utas.edu.au/11461/1/Geology_OD1.pdf
Ehrig, K., McPhie, J., Kamenetsky, V. (2012) Geology and mineralogical zonation of the Olympic Dam iron oxide Cu-U-Au-Ag deposit, South Australia. Economic Geology Special Publication 16, pg. 237-267.
Kirchenbaur, M., Maas, R., Ehrig, K., Kamenetsky, V. S., Strub, E., Ballhaus, C., & Münker, C. (2016). Uranium and Sm isotope studies of the supergiant Olympic Dam Cu–Au–U–Ag deposit, South Australia. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 180, 15-32.
Macmillan, E., Cook, N.J., Ehrig, K., Ciobanu, C.L., Pring, A. (2016): Uraninite from the Olympic Dam IOCG-U-Ag deposit: linking textural and compositional variation to temporal evolution. American Mineralogist: 101: 1295-1320.
Macmillan, E., Cook, N.J., Ehrig, K., Pring, A. (2017): Chemical and textural interpretation of late-stage coffinite and brannerite from the Olympic Dam IOCG-Ag-U deposit. Mineralogical Magazine 81, 1323-1366.
Ciobanu, C. L., Cook, N. J., Ehrig, K. (2017): Ore minerals down to the nanoscale: Cu-(Fe)-sulphides from the iron oxide copper gold deposit at Olympic Dam, South Australia. Ore Geology Review 81, 1218-1235.

Documents

Title (click to view)YearAuthor
The Olympic Dam Mega-Expansion Without Uranium Recovery 2010Dr Gavin M. Mudd
Olympic Dam Expansion Draft Environmental Impact Statement2009BHP

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