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Baryte locality, Somers, Tolland Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Baryte locality- not defined -
Somers- not defined -
Tolland Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Location is approximate, estimate based on other nearby localities.
 
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° North , 72° West (est.)
Margin of Error:~12km
Köppen climate type:Dfb : Warm-summer humid continental climate


A relatively new location on private property discovered by Bill Clark circa 2002-3. Located on a hydrothermally mineralized section of the Eastern Border Fault of the Hartford Mesozoic Basin, the matrix is massive quartz, with some massive fluorite and romanechite associated with malachite and azurite. Pockets have produced fine baryte specimens, good fluorite, and interesting copper secondaries, including the best azurite crystals from Connecticut. The mineralization resembles the fluorite/quartz deposits of Westmoreland, NH, which are on a northerly extension of this fault. The fluorite crystals at both places show tetrahexahedral form.

There appear to be three generations of baryte crystallization: 1) an initial coarse-grained, tabular to massive, opaque white phase in massive quartz and fluorite, 2) a translucent, creamy tan overgrowth phase usually in subparallel orientation on the white barite in voids within the previous matrix, some from the dissolution of fluorite, and 3) a transparent, colorless to blue overgrowth phase on either phase 1 or 2 baryte crystals, or isolated. All three phases of crystals can show varying degrees of surface etching. Small tabular white crystals and yellow, transparent, acicular crystals are also known.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


11 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Azurite
Formula: Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Habit: Tabular to tapered groups
Colour: Very dark blue
Description: Mostly massive, found in massive quartz with massive chalcocite, malachite, fluorite.
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection, Harold Moritz collection
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Habit: massive tabular, subparallel overgrowths with curved faces, short prismatic to acicular
Colour: white, creamy tan, blue, yellow, colorless
Fluorescence: rarely yellow-white, or blue-green primarily under SW
Description: There appear to be three generations of baryte crystallization: 1) an initial coarse-grained, tabular to massive, opaque white phase in massive quartz and fluorite, 2) a translucent, creamy tan overgrowth phase usually in subparallel orientation on the white barite in voids within the previous matrix, some from the dissolution of fluorite, and 3) a transparent, colorless to blue overgrowth phase on either phase 1 or 2 baryte crystals, or isolated. All three phases of crystals can show varying degrees of surface etching. Small tabular white crystals and yellow, transparent, acicular crystals are also known.
Reference: Bill Clark collection, Harold Moritz collection, Jeremy Zolan collection
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Habit: massive
Colour: brassy
Description: small blebs
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection, Harold Moritz collection
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Habit: cubic with tetrahexahedral overgrowths
Colour: colorless, pale blue, purple, green
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection, Harold Moritz collection
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Habit: massive, earthy
Colour: dark brown
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Colour: red
Description: earthy red massive material, dissolved in HCl with positive results for iron (as opposed to copper)
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Habit: radiating acicular, mossy aggregates
Colour: green
Description: alteration of chalcocite, typically with azurite in massive quartz and fluorite
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection, Harold Moritz collection
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Harold Moritz collection
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Habit: drusy
Colour: white
Description: Massive matrix for much of the mineralization but despite its abundance, only tiny drusy crystals present
Reference: Jeremy Zolan collection, Harold Moritz collection
Romanèchite
Formula: (Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
Habit: botryoidal
Colour: very dark brown to black
Description: As masses with conchoidal fracture and black streak in quartz with azurite and malachite. Analyzed 2016 by Peter Cristofono and Tom Mortimer using EDS. Closest other analytical possibility is hollandite, which has a slightly higher Ba:Mn ratio, and doesn't match the physical properties of this material as well as romanechite does.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Romanèchite4.DK.10(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Azurite5.BA.05Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Group 9 - Silicates
Chrysocolla9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB8X16
Romanèchite7.9.2.1(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Azurite16a.2.1.1Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H Romanèchite(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
CCarbon
C AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
OOxygen
O BaryteBaSO4
O AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O Romanèchite(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
O HematiteFe2O3
O QuartzSiO2
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
AlAluminium
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
SiSilicon
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si QuartzSiO2
SSulfur
S BaryteBaSO4
S PyriteFeS2
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
CaCalcium
Ca FluoriteCaF2
MnManganese
Mn Romanèchite(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10
FeIron
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe HematiteFe2O3
CuCopper
Cu AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
Ba Romanèchite(Ba,H2O)2(Mn4+,Mn3+)5O10

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