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Edison Mine, Sparta Township, Sussex County, New Jersey, USAi
Regional Level Types
Edison MineMine
Sparta TownshipTownship
Sussex CountyCounty
New JerseyState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 3' 46'' North , 74° 34' 19'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Ogdensburg2,286 (2017)2.7km
Sparta19,722 (2018)6.5km
Franklin4,855 (2017)6.6km
Lake Mohawk9,916 (2017)8.9km
Hamburg3,155 (2017)10.1km


A former Fe mine in magnetite ore located 2 to 3 miles SE of Ogdensburg in Sparta Township. This mine was owned by the New Jersey and Pennsylvania Concentrating Co., an enterprise of Thomas Alva Edison. Edison was a respected inventor of mining technology, including beneficiation machines. Here he applied his inventions to concentrate magnetite into briquette but almost went bankrupt when the Mesabee Range deposits were discovered in the mid-west. Workings here are a large open cut. This mine incorporated several of the earlier Ogden group mines.

The Edison Mine was developed in the 1890’s by Thomas Edison. Edison invested approximately $2 million of his own funds and another million of investor money. The idea was to mine relatively low grade iron ore, cheaply from surface open pits, concentrate the magnetite and form it into briquette heavy enough to be blast furnace feed. The mine site was chosen after an extensive dip needle (sort of a crude magnetometer) survey of zone that contained numerous small iron mines and exploration trenches. The small mines were opened on local, relatively high grade areas, within an extensive area of low grade magnetite-bearing rock. The most extensive tract of ore with an adequate grade for the project became the site of the Edison townsite, the mill and the two major ore producing quarries. The Edison mine workings were superimposed on some of the older mines, mainly the Ogden and Roberts.

The Edison mine was a large industrial enterprise even by today’s standards. Because it was remote from the established towns, by the standards of the time, it included housing for the workers and was the first populated place in the area with electricity and electric lights. Because there was a railroad spur to the site it became a tourist destination because it combined the scenery of the hills and forest with the industrial progress that was so highly valued in that era.

The Edison mine exploits a type of ore that is unlike that of most of the great many iron mines that dotted the Reading Prong highlands of New Jersey as well as adjacent New York and Pennsylvania. Magnetite was contained in a potassium feldspar gneiss. The magnetite-rich bands are concordant with the foliation of the gneiss indicating that it is a premetamorphic feature. The typical grade of this ore was 12 – 14% Fe. Although K-spar gneiss is a fairly common lithology in the northwestern highlands most has been interpreted as meta arkose. However, recent evidence (Puffer and Gorring, Canadian Journal of Earth Science 42(10): 1735–1748 (2005)) suggests that the K-spar gneiss that hosts the Edison mine ore may be a meta rhyolite.

Ore at the Edison mine was extracted from 2 parallel bands of magnetite-rich gneiss, each approximately 40-50 feet thick and 50-75 feet apart. The most dramatic icon of these parallel bands is the Horseshoe cut with its 2 narrow, parallel cuts separated by a mass barren material. Another interesting aspect of the ore deposit worked by the Edison mine is a sulphide-rich horizon. The sulphide horizon ranges up to 40 feet thick and contains elevated concentrations of pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and molybdenite. It is adjacent to or overlaps the southeastern magnetite ore band and extends thru the Horseshoe and Roberts cuts. In the Horseshoe cut the sulphide horizon was intruded by pegmatite and recrystallized. The recrystallized areas produced some very fine molybdenite crystals and are among the best in the world for crystal perfection and good size.

Just northeast of the Roberts cut the Kspar gneiss band is split by a fold. The sulphide horizon reappears in the eastern branch of the Kspar gneiss band. Approximately 3000 feet northeast of the northeastern end of the Roberts cut is the “Copper shaft”, an exploration in a portion of the sulphide zone containing significant bornite.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded from this region.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

19 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

'Albite-Anorthite Series'
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.
'Apatite'
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
Reference: No reference listed
'Biotite'
Formula: K(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
Reference: American Museum of Natural History display specimen
Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Reference: Collected by David Bernstein-May 2010.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Collected by David Bernstein-May 2010.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: No reference listed
Chamosite
Formula: (Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Reference: American Museum of Natural History display specimen
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Reference: Collected by David Bernstein-May 2010.
Covellite
Formula: CuS
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.
Cuprite
Formula: Cu2O
Reference: Collected by David S. Bernstein-2008/2009
'Feldspar Group'
Reference: Collected by David S. Bernstein-2008/2009
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.
'Garnet Group'
Formula: X3Z2(SiO4)3
Reference: No reference listed
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Reference: American Museum of Natural History display specimen
Hematite
Formula: Fe2O3
Reference: Collected by David Bernstein-May 2010.
Ilmenite
Formula: Fe2+TiO3
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.
Kyanite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Reference: No reference listed
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
'Mica Group'
Reference: Collected by David S. Bernstein-2008/2009
Molybdenite
Formula: MoS2
Habit: Pyramidal crystals with c pinacoids
Colour: Metallic gray
Fluorescence: Not fluorescent in UV
Reference: No reference listed
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: No reference listed
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Collected by David S. Bernstein-2008/2009
Sillimanite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.
Tremolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Reference: Collected by David S. Bernstein-2008/2009
Zircon
Formula: Zr(SiO4)
Reference: Baker, D.R. and Buddington, A.f. (1970) Geology and Magnetite Deposits of the Franklin Qudrangle and Part of the Hamburg Quadrangle, New Jersey. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 638, 71 pages, at p. 53.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Bornite2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Covellite2.CA.05aCuS
Molybdenite2.EA.30MoS2
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cuprite4.AA.10Cu2O
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Hematite4.CB.05Fe2O3
Ilmenite4.CB.05Fe2+TiO3
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Group 9 - Silicates
Chamosite9.EC.55(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Chrysocolla9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Kyanite9.AF.15Al2(SiO4)O
Sillimanite9.AF.05Al2(SiO4)O
Tremolite9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Zircon9.AD.30Zr(SiO4)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
'Apatite'-Ca5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
'Biotite'-K(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
'Feldspar Group'-
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Mica Group'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Covellite2.8.12.1CuS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Molybdenite2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X
Cuprite4.1.1.1Cu2O
A2X3
Hematite4.3.1.2Fe2O3
Ilmenite4.3.5.1Fe2+TiO3
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in >[6] coordination
Zircon51.5.2.1Zr(SiO4)
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] and >[4] coordination
Kyanite52.2.2c.1Al2(SiO4)O
Sillimanite52.2.2a.1Al2(SiO4)O
Group 66 - INOSILICATES Double-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=2)
Amphiboles - Mg-Fe-Mn-Li subgroup
Tremolite66.1.3a.1☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings interlayered 1:1, 2:1, and octahedra
Chamosite71.4.1.7(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
'Apatite'-Ca5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
'Biotite'-K(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
'Feldspar Group'-
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Mica Group'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
H Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
H BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
CCarbon
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
O KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
O CupriteCu2O
O Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O QuartzSiO2
O HematiteFe2O3
O CalciteCaCO3
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
O BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
O SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O ZirconZr(SiO4)
FFluorine
F ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
F BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
F FluoriteCaF2
MgMagnesium
Mg Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Mg BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
AlAluminium
Al KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Al Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Al BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
Al SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
SiSilicon
Si KyaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
Si Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Si BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
Si SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si ZirconZr(SiO4)
PPhosphorus
P ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
SSulfur
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S PyriteFeS2
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S CovelliteCuS
ClChlorine
Cl ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
KPotassium
K BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
CaCalcium
Ca ApatiteCa5(PO4)3(Cl/F/OH)
Ca Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca FluoriteCaF2
TiTitanium
Ti IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
FeIron
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe HematiteFe2O3
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
Fe Chamosite(Fe2+,Mg,Al,Fe3+)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH,O)8
Fe BiotiteK(Fe2+/Mg)2(Al/Fe3+/Mg)([Si/Al]Si2O10)(OH/F)2
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu CupriteCu2O
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu CovelliteCuS
ZrZirconium
Zr ZirconZr(SiO4)
MoMolybdenum
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Bayley, William Shirley (1910), The Iron Mines of New Jersey, MacCrellish & Quigley, state printers, 1910: 277-281.
Anderson (1980).
Dunn, Pete J. (1995), Part 1: 91.
Puffer and Gorring, Canadian Journal of Earth Science 42(10): 1735–1748 (2005)

Other Databases

USGS MRDS Record:10056403

Localities in this Region

Other Regions, Features and Areas containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
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