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Boral Limited quarry, Bundoora, City of Whittlesea, Victoria, Australiai
Regional Level Types
Boral Limited quarryQuarry
Bundoora- not defined -
City of Whittlesea- not defined -
VictoriaState
AustraliaCountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
37° 40' 54'' South , 145° 2' 44'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Köppen climate type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Bundoora25,709 (2015)2.2km
Mill Park30,517 (2015)2.5km
Thomastown20,331 (2015)2.5km
Lalor19,873 (2015)3.1km
Kingsbury3,362 (2015)3.7km


The Bundoora quarry was started in the 1970's and was elliptical in shape, measuring some 800 x 550 metres and was worked at three levels over a maximum depth of 32 metres. Four near-horizontal discontinuities in the basalt can be distinguished at various levels throughout the quarry. The 18 metre discontinuity which can be traced throughout the quarry marks the upper level of all zeolite occurrences. Carbonate minerals only can be found above this level with the exception of ilmenite and opal-AN (hyalite).

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


15 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Analcime
Formula: Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Description: "Analcime appears to have been the first zeolite to crystallize. Analcime always occurs as very small (1mm or less), yellowish to colourless, water-clear trapezohedral crystal. Crystals of analcime may occur in druses or individually." They are not very common at the Bundoora quarry.
Reference: Tschernich, R. (1992): Zeolites of the World, p.49; W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Aragonite
Formula: CaCO3
Description: "Aragonite has been found generally in the vesicular basalt above the zeolite zone. Spectacular aragonite sprays, white or yellow and measuring up to 40 mm across have been collected. Mamillary calcite is a common associated carbonate, and occasional small barite clusters may be present."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Description: "Translucent to opaque-white, bladed barite crystals in clusters up to 8 mm in size occur with mammillary calcite at the Bundoora quarry."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Description: Ferroan calcite is by far the most common type of calcite at the Bundoora quarry. Normal calcite occurs as white to cream mammillary coatings lining cavities along with aragonite crystal sprays and very rarely, small bladed clusters of barite.
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Calcite var: Ferroan Calcite
Formula: (Ca,Fe)CO3
Description: "Ferroan calcite is abundant and is intimately associated with the zeolites. The calcites are various shades of yellow, orange and brown, are translucent to opaque, and occur in a number of spectacular forms such as clubs which sometimes taper to fragile stems providing the point of attachment to the matrix; 'bow-ties'; hemispheres and nodules. The various structures are usually made up of tightly packed fibres which give a silky appearance to the specimen when held in a certain direction. Calcite also occurs as yellowish brown glassy prisms. Simple calcite rhombs are rare, although 'dog-tooth spar' is not uncommon."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Chabazite-Ca
Formula: (Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Chabazite-Na
Formula: (Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Description: "Chabazite occurs as colourless, water-clear sparkling crystals, which rapidly dehydrate and become opaque and crazed upon exposure. Micro crystals are very much less affected. The crystals are always twinned, and simple chabazite rhombs, or forms dominated by the rhomb, have never been observed at Bundoora. The 'Phacolite' form and complex clusters based on this unit, are exceedingly common (up to 15 mm across)and alternative forms are rare. Chabazite from Bundoora is almost always tabular and only very rarely is the pyramidal form present to any significant extent. Prismatic crystals from Bundoora are less than 1 mm across. The crystals sometimes look like a stack of hexagonal plates, doubly terminated by the perfect hexagonal pyramid and basal plane. The plates may show a graded increase in diameter towards the middle of the crystal, generating a barrel-shape, or a graded decrease in diameter towards the centre generating an hour-glass shape, or the plates may simply show uneven stacking generating the rough prisms."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30 & 92
Copper
Formula: Cu
Description: "Native copper has been found at Bundoora as films on joint planes, grains in the basalt and as grains in vesicles, either in isolation or with drusy coatings of analcime or 'phacolite'. A specimen of a microcrystal of copper has been collected at Bundoora."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Gobbinsite
Formula: Na5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Habit: Radiating crystal group
Colour: White
Description: "The gobbinsite crystals form aggregates up to 4 mm across. They are water clear, with a wedge-like habit and lustrous faces that show evidence for lamellar twinning. Crystals are complexly interpenetrating and in some clusters show an apparent epitaxial relationship with a phillipsite crystal or with platy twinned aggregates of thomsonite."
Reference: G.D.Gatta, W.D.Birch & N.Rotirot. Reinvestigation of the crystal structure of the zeolite Gobbinsite. American Mineralogist 2010 vol. 95 pp.481-486
Gonnardite
Formula: (Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Description: "The Gonnardite/Natrolite intergrowth, was considered mesolite prior to 1988. They occur as small, opaque white hemispheres and tuffs composed of radiating fibres and prismatic needles. The individual groups have diameter up to 6 mm, though typically are 1-3 mm. The groups show a variety of lustres-chalky, sub-vitreous or silky, and prismatic needles appear quite glassy when viewed through the microscope. The clusters that have been studied are radially zoned, presenting a compact gonnardite-rich core and a soft fibrous natrolite-rich outer zone."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Ilmenite
Formula: Fe2+TiO3
Description: Ilmenite has been observed in several levels of the quarry. In the upper levels it occurs as black lustrous hexagonal shaped platy crystals up to 1 mm across. It also occurs in the zeolite zone, with crystals (<1mm across) laying flat on the walls of cavities, many of these crystals having a bronze coloured alteration on their surface.
Reference: Peter Hall collection Steve Sorrell collection
Natrolite
Formula: Na2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Description: "The Gonnardite/Natrolite intergrowth, was considered mesolite prior to 1988. They occur as small, opaque white hemispheres and tuffs composed of radiating fibres and prismatic needles. The individual groups have diameter up to 6 mm, though typically are 1-3 mm. The groups show a variety of lustres-chalky, sub-vitreous or silky, and prismatic needles appear quite glassy when viewed through the microscope. The clusters that have been studied are radially zoned, presenting a compact gonnardite-rich core and a soft fibrous natrolite-rich outer zone."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Opal var: Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
'Phillipsite'
Phillipsite-Na
Formula: (Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
Description: "Phillipsite is always found in complex twinned crystals, with smaller crystals generally showing the simple forms such as the fourling, the prismatic and cruciform eightling and clusters based on these. Varieties of the larger crystals include the 'double cross', clusters based on this twinned form, and exceedingly complex rosettes and hemispheres and blocky aggregates. Some specimens from Bundoora show drusy colourless crystals of phillipsite which often appear as pseudo-octagonal aggregates with cores of white powdery phillipsite. In freshly opened cavities, crystals of phillipsite are colourless to water-clear, but the larger crystals, like those of chabazite, soon become translucent to opaque-white when allowed to dehydrate upon exposure."
Reference: Birch (1989) Zeolites of Victoria, p 100; W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Description: "Spheroidal clusters up to 5 mm across, composed of octahedral crystals of pyrite have been found in association with mammillary calcite and aragonite at Bundoora."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30
Thomsonite-Ca
Formula: NaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Description: "Thomsonite often forms smooth, translucent, grey to pale brown hemispheres with a resinous lustre. The hemispheres are up to 3 mm in diameter and are composed of elongated plates which are exceedingly thin. Other forms include compact fibrous sheafs and tuffs which retain the grey translucent appearance of the globular form. The tips of these fibres sometimes appear as if they have been partly fused together. Hemispheres of thomsonite from Bundoora sometimes show secondary radiating needle and sheaf-like growths issuing from the surface. The needles show natrolite-like terminations."
Reference: W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Ilmenite4.CB.05Fe2+TiO3
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var: Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aragonite5.AB.15CaCO3
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
var: Ferroan Calcite5.AB.05(Ca,Fe)CO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Group 9 - Silicates
Analcime9.GB.05Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Chabazite-Ca9.GD.10(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Chabazite-Na9.GD.10(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Gobbinsite9.GC.05Na5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Gonnardite9.GA.05(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Natrolite9.GA.05Na2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Phillipsite-Na9.GC.10(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
Thomsonite-Ca9.GA.10NaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Phillipsite'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Ilmenite4.3.5.1Fe2+TiO3
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 77 - TECTOSILICATES Zeolites
Zeolite group - True zeolites
Analcime77.1.1.1Na(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Chabazite-Ca77.1.2.1(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Gobbinsite77.1.3.4Na5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Gonnardite77.1.5.7(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Natrolite77.1.5.1Na2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Aragonite-CaCO3
Calcite
var: Ferroan Calcite
-(Ca,Fe)CO3
Chabazite-Na-(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Opal
var: Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
'Phillipsite'-
Phillipsite-Na-(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
Thomsonite-Ca-NaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H GobbinsiteNa5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
H AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
H Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
H NatroliteNa2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
H Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
H Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
H Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
H Phillipsite-Na(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
CCarbon
C AragoniteCaCO3
C CalciteCaCO3
C Calcite (var: Ferroan Calcite)(Ca,Fe)CO3
OOxygen
O GobbinsiteNa5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
O AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
O AragoniteCaCO3
O BaryteBaSO4
O CalciteCaCO3
O Calcite (var: Ferroan Calcite)(Ca,Fe)CO3
O Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
O NatroliteNa2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
O IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
O Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
O Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
O Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
O Phillipsite-Na(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
NaSodium
Na GobbinsiteNa5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Na AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Na Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Na NatroliteNa2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Na Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Na Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Na Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Na Phillipsite-Na(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
AlAluminium
Al GobbinsiteNa5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Al AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Al Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Al NatroliteNa2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Al Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Al Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Al Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Al Phillipsite-Na(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
SiSilicon
Si GobbinsiteNa5(Si11Al5)O32 · 11H2O
Si AnalcimeNa(AlSi2O6) · H2O
Si Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Si NatroliteNa2Al2Si3O10 · 2H2O
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
Si Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Si Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Si Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Si Phillipsite-Na(Na,K,Ca0.5,Ba0.5)4-7[Al4-7Si12-9O32] · 12H2O
SSulfur
S BaryteBaSO4
S PyriteFeS2
KPotassium
K Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
K Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
CaCalcium
Ca AragoniteCaCO3
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca Calcite (var: Ferroan Calcite)(Ca,Fe)CO3
Ca Gonnardite(Na,Ca)2(Si,Al)5O10 · 3H2O
Ca Thomsonite-CaNaCa2[Al5Si5O20] · 6H2O
Ca Chabazite-Ca(Ca,K2,Na2)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
Ca Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
TiTitanium
Ti IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
FeIron
Fe Calcite (var: Ferroan Calcite)(Ca,Fe)CO3
Fe IlmeniteFe2+TiO3
Fe PyriteFeS2
CuCopper
Cu CopperCu
SrStrontium
Sr Chabazite-Na(Na2,K2,Ca,Sr,Mg)2[Al2Si4O12]2 · 12H2O
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
W.D.Birch 1989. Zeolites of Victoria. The Mineralogical Society of Victoria, special publication no.2, pp. 11-30, 92 & 93

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Australian PlateTectonic Plate

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