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Aga Khan Mine, Poona, Cue Shire, Western Australia, Australiai
Regional Level Types
Aga Khan MineMine
Poona- not defined -
Cue ShireShire
Western AustraliaState
AustraliaCountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 27° 7' 34'' South , 117° 27' 37'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): -27.12633,117.46044
GeoHash:G#: qe5t8vu1d
Locality type:Mine
Köppen climate type:BWh : Hot deserts climate


The Aga Khan Mine is the most significant on the field, and is probably where most specimens in collections originate.

Either Lesley 'Fin' Francis Ryan, or his older brother Henry 'Harry' Alexander Ryan, were the first confirmed, as discovering emeralds at Poona. Their father, Alfred Patrick 'Paddy' Ryan pegged the lease, after showing emeralds found by the brothers to a geologist in 1912, and being told they were valuable. It was called Reward Claim or Mt Ryan lease. Mining was abandoned by 1919, after only low quality emeralds were found.

Renewed interest occurred from 1926-1936, when several groups mined the field. In the words of the reference ' these groups spent a fair amount of money, churned up a significant amount of ground, discovered an abundance of low value emeralds, and a handful of pretty mineral specimens.' Again the field was abandoned.

The Aga Khan Mine was named after the Aga Khan 3 of India, who was a shareholder in the Star Emerald Mining Syndicate. He had an interest in the emerald field from 1928-1937, and a small quantity of ore was shipped to India in drums. The Aga Khan's involvement with the field is the stuff of myths and legends, which space cannot afford here.

All was quiet till 1963, when Clive Daw started mining the Reward Claim area. As before, little great material was produced, and he sold the lease in 1974 to the newly formed Poona Emeralds Pty Ltd, who could also not make the mine profitable, and abandoned the lease in 1978.

Clement Stephen Cook pegged the ground which was to become the Aga Khan Mine in 1959. He too could not make a living from the mine, and sold it to the Bond Corporation in 1970. Headed by colourful entrepreneur, Alan Bond, whose life could fill up several Mindat pages.

Around 1968, Robert 'Bob' Bellairs pegged several leases in the alluvial tin area south of Cooke's, and mined emerald just north-west of Solomon's. When Bond Corporation lost their lease due to liquidity problems, Bob pegged the lease, naming it Aga Khan. Between 1976-1977, Bob mined the lease, producing 13 830 carat of emerald, but again could not make a profit and mining ceased.

Ralph Bellairs, brother of the above Robert pegged the Emerald Pool Mine, 5 kms east around 1978. Around 1980, saw a major expansion of mining at Aga Khan, when Robert Bellairs went into partnership with two established mining companies. Thirty people worked the mine for six months, culminating in Robert and his mining partner June Kelly travelling to Sydney with over a million dollars of emeralds. Robert passed away soon after. In 1981, the mine had produced 7 580 carat of emerald and 600 mineral specimens (?), but was still unprofitable and closed.

October 1982, the Quartz Blow open cut was mined for six weeks by Minerals and Metal Exchange of Western Australia, and 20 000 carat taken to India. It was of such low quality, the price obtained for the material led them to abandon the mine. In 1988, J.A. Securities Pty ltd had control of all the leases on the field, and began mining at Reward Claim, and mining ceased again in 1990.

In 2001, Mark Hewitt began mining at Aga Khan and the adjacent mines on a part time basis for specimens. Since then this has also been abandoned, although specimens from this period still come up for sale each year at the Perth mineral show.

Regions containing this locality

Australian Plate (Australia Plate)Tectonic Plate
West Australian Element, Western Australia, AustraliaCraton
Warakurna Large Igneous Province, Western Australia, AustraliaGeologic Province
Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, AustraliaCraton

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


17 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Actinolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Apatite'
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Beryl var: Emerald
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Biotite'
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Chlorite Group'
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Chromite
Formula: Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Chrysoberyl
Formula: BeAl2O4
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Chrysoberyl var: Alexandrite
Formula: BeAl2O4
Reference: Groat, L.A., Giuliani, G., Marshall, D.D., and Turner, D. (2008): Ore Geology Reviews 34, 87-112.
Columbite-(Fe)
Formula: Fe2+Nb2O6
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Corundum
Formula: Al2O3
Reference: Groat, L.A., Giuliani, G., Marshall, D.D., and Turner, D. (2008): Ore Geology Reviews 34, 87-112.
Corundum var: Ruby
Formula: Al2O3
Reference: Groat, L.A., Giuliani, G., Marshall, D.D., and Turner, D. (2008): Ore Geology Reviews 34, 87-112.
Corundum var: Sapphire
Formula: Al2O3
Reference: Groat, L.A., Giuliani, G., Marshall, D.D., and Turner, D. (2008): Ore Geology Reviews 34, 87-112.
Epidote
Formula: {Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'K Feldspar'
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Margarite
Formula: CaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Monazite'
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Phlogopite
Formula: KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Scheelite
Formula: Ca(WO4)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Tantalite'
Formula: (Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Topaz
Formula: Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
'Zinnwaldite'
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35
Zircon
Formula: Zr(SiO4)
Reference: Emeralds of the World English extraLapis Vol. 2 2002 pp24-35

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Chromite4.BB.05Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Chrysoberyl4.BA.05BeAl2O4
var: Alexandrite4.BA.05BeAl2O4
Columbite-(Fe)4.DB.35Fe2+Nb2O6
Corundum4.CB.05Al2O3
var: Ruby4.CB.05Al2O3
var: Sapphire4.CB.05Al2O3
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Scheelite7.GA.05Ca(WO4)
Group 9 - Silicates
Actinolite9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Emerald9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Epidote9.BG.05a{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Margarite9.EC.30CaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Phlogopite9.EC.20KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Topaz9.AF.35Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Zircon9.AD.30Zr(SiO4)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Apatite'-
'Biotite'-
'Chlorite Group'-
'K Feldspar'-
'Monazite'-
'Tantalite'-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
'Zinnwaldite'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X3
Corundum4.3.1.1Al2O3
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Chromite7.2.3.3Fe2+Cr3+2O4
Chrysoberyl7.2.9.1BeAl2O4
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
AB2O6
Columbite-(Fe)8.3.2.2Fe2+Nb2O6
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Scheelite48.1.2.1Ca(WO4)
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in >[6] coordination
Zircon51.5.2.1Zr(SiO4)
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [6] coordination only
Topaz52.3.1.1Al2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Epidote58.2.1a.7{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Margarite71.2.2c.1CaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Phlogopite71.2.2b.1KMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Actinolite-☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
'Apatite'-
Beryl
var: Emerald
-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
'Biotite'-
'Chlorite Group'-
Chrysoberyl
var: Alexandrite
-BeAl2O4
Corundum
var: Ruby
-Al2O3
var: Sapphire-Al2O3
'K Feldspar'-
'Monazite'-
'Tantalite'-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
'Zinnwaldite'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H MargariteCaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
H TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
H Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl (var: Emerald)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
Be Chrysoberyl (var: Alexandrite)BeAl2O4
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
OOxygen
O Beryl (var: Emerald)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O MargariteCaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
O TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
O ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
O QuartzSiO2
O ZirconZr(SiO4)
O CassiteriteSnO2
O ScheeliteCa(WO4)
O Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
O Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
O ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
O Chrysoberyl (var: Alexandrite)BeAl2O4
O Corundum (var: Ruby)Al2O3
O Corundum (var: Sapphire)Al2O3
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O CorundumAl2O3
FFluorine
F FluoriteCaF2
F TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
NaSodium
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
MgMagnesium
Mg PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Mg Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
AlAluminium
Al Beryl (var: Emerald)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al MargariteCaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Al TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Al ChrysoberylBeAl2O4
Al Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al Chrysoberyl (var: Alexandrite)BeAl2O4
Al Corundum (var: Ruby)Al2O3
Al Corundum (var: Sapphire)Al2O3
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al CorundumAl2O3
SiSilicon
Si Beryl (var: Emerald)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si MargariteCaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Si TopazAl2(SiO4)(F,OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si ZirconZr(SiO4)
Si Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
KPotassium
K PhlogopiteKMg3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca MargariteCaAl2(Al2Si2O10)(OH)2
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca ScheeliteCa(WO4)
Ca Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
CrChromium
Cr ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
MnManganese
Mn Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
FeIron
Fe Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Fe Epidote{Ca2}{Al2Fe3+}(Si2O7)(SiO4)O(OH)
Fe Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Fe Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
Fe ChromiteFe2+Cr23+O4
ZrZirconium
Zr ZirconZr(SiO4)
NbNiobium
Nb Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Nb Columbite-(Fe)Fe2+Nb2O6
SnTin
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
TaTantalum
Ta Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
WTungsten
W ScheeliteCa(WO4)

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Quaternary
0 - 2.588 Ma



ID: 759094
colluvium 38491

Age: Pleistocene (0 - 2.588 Ma)

Description: Colluvium and/or residual deposits, sheetwash, talus, scree; boulder, gravel, sand; may include minor alluvial or sand plain deposits, local calcrete and reworked laterite

Comments: regolith; synthesis of multiple published descriptions

Lithology: Regolith

Reference: Raymond, O.L., Liu, S., Gallagher, R., Zhang, W., Highet, L.M. Surface Geology of Australia 1:1 million scale dataset 2012 edition. Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia). [5]

Neoarchean - Mesoarchean
2500 - 3200 Ma



ID: 3187503
Archean intrusive rocks

Age: Archean (2500 - 3200 Ma)

Comments: Yilgarn Craton

Lithology: Intrusive igneous rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Groat, L.A., Giuliani, G., Marshall, D.D., and Turner, D. (2008): Emerald deposits and occurrences: A review. Ore Geology Reviews (2008):34: 87-112.
Jacobson, M., Calderwood, M., Grguric, B.(2007): Pegmatites of Western Australia (2007)


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