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Davis Creek Mine, Fortymile District, Southeast Fairbanks Borough, Alaska, USA

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 64° 4' 3'' North , 141° 1' 40'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 64.06750,-141.02778
Köppen climate type:Dfc : Subarctic climate


Location: Davis Creek is a small headwater tributary of the Walker Fork of the Fortymile River. Davis Creek is about 3 miles long; the upper 1 mile is located in Yukon Territory, Canada. Placer workings extend about 1.5 miles upstream from the mouth of Davis Creek; the coordinates are the approximate midpoint of the placer workings, in section 2, T. 26 N., R. 22 E., of the Copper River Meridian. The location is accurate. Davis Creek is localities 15 and 76 of Cobb (1972 [MF-393]), localities 20 and 37 of Eberlein and others (1977), and locality 109 of Burleigh and Lear (1994).
Geology: Bedrock along Davis Creek consists of greenschist-facies carbonaceous schist and quartzite with abundant quartz lenses, as awll as minor biotite-quartz schist (R.L. Flynn, unpub. data, 2000). These rocks are part of the Nasina Series of McConnell (1905) and are derived from a Mississippian protolith (Mortensen, 1999). Near the mouth of the creek, the Davis Creek gravel consists of 4 feet of muck, overlying 4 feet of coarse gravel (with many boulders more than 8 inches in diameter), which in turn overlies 4 feet of finer gravel, pebbles, and sand that coarsen at the bottom (Spurr, 1898). The lower 4 feet of gravel was the pay streak; in many places gold also occurs in the top 6 to 8 inches of weathered bedrock. On the Discovery claim, located about one-half mile upstream of its mouth, the paystreak was 10 feet wide. Upstream, near the Canadian border, the gravel shallowed to just over 6 feet thick, and the paystreak at the base was reduced to 2 feet thick and less than 5 feet wide (Spurr, 1898). Gold in Davis Creek was coarse, and both rounded and flattened nuggets were recovered (Spurr, 1898). Placer gold from Davis Creek has a fineness of 885 parts gold per thousand (Metz and Hawkins, 1981). Walker Fork (EA156) has produced placer gold downstream of Davis Creek; Poker Creek (EA158) and Younger Creek (EA159) are other nearby creeks with placer gold production. Although a significant lode source has not been identified for the gold in Davis Creek, Spurr (1898) described a horizontal quartz vein in schist that contained gold (see Lowry's Ledge, EA157). Placer gold was first discovered in the Walker Fork drainage on Davis Creek in 1888; this discovery resulted in a stampede from Franklin Gulch (EA116) (Spurr, 1898). Thirty-five miners produced $30,000 of gold (gold at $20.67 per ounce)on Davis Creek in 1893 (Spurr, 1898). Davis Creek and the other headwater tributaries of Walker Fork were mostly mined out by the turn of the century, although there are several reports of mining on Davis Creek into the 1930's (Yeend, 1996). Mining was reported on Davis Creek in 1989 (Bundtzen and others, 1990). Yeend (1996) reports a small open-cut mining operation active in the early 1990's on Davis Creek. A small open-cut mining operation was active on Davis Creek from 1979 through 2000 (Norm LaFramboise, Boundary Explorations, Inc., written commun., 2000).
Workings: Placer gold was first discovered in the Walker Fork drainage on Davis Creek in 1888; this discovery resulted in a stampede from Franklin Gulch (EA116) (Spurr, 1898). Davis Creek and the other headwater tributaries of Walker Fork were mostly mined out by the turn of the century, although there are several reports of mining on Davis Creek into the 1930's (Yeend, 1996). Mining was reported on Davis Creek in 1989 (Bundtzen and others, 1990). Yeend (1996) reports a small open-cut mining operation active in the early 1990's on Davis Creek. A small open-cut mining operation was active on Davis Creek from 1979 through 2000 (Norm LaFramboise, Boundary Explorations, Inc., written commun., 2000).
Age: Quaternary.
Production: Thirty-five miners produced $30,000 of gold (at $20.67 per ounce of gold) on Davis Creek in 1893 (Spurr, 1898). Placer gold from Davis Creek has a fineness of 885 parts gold per thousand (Metz and Hawkins, 1981).

Commodities (Major) - Au
Development Status: Yes; small
Deposit Model: Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).

Mineral List


1 valid mineral.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Paleozoic - Cambrian-Ordovician
252.17 - 541 Ma



ID: 1692634
Keevy Peak Formation and similar rocks

Age: Paleozoic (252.17 - 541 Ma)

Description: Fine-grained, predominantly dark gray, commonly pyritic, carbonaceous quartzite and phengitequartz schist, with lesser graphitequartz schist and light gray quartzite. Locally grades into thin layers of biotitealbite-bearing quartz schist and quartzite, and are locally calcite-rich and include some marble. Apparent thickness is greater than 1,000 m, as this unit underlies a large adjacent area in Yukon Territory (Mortensen, 1988a). Foliation is locally crenulated; quartz lenses are common and commonly isoclinally folded. Magnetic susceptibility unit is very low, 0.010.15 x 10-3 SI, with sporadic higher values. The carbonaceous rocks are strongly conductive, although low conductivity quartzite with little to no carbon is interlayered throughout the unit. Consequently, high conductivity, covered zones near outcrops of Nasina quartzite were also mapped as Nasina. Phengite from a phengitequartz schist layer yielded 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of 106.3 0.6 Ma and 116 0.9 Ma (sample A11; table 1), presumably reflecting age of cooling from peak metamorphism

Lithology: Metamorphic

Reference: Wilson, F.H., Hults, C.P., Mull, C.G, and Karl, S.M. (compilers). Geologic map of Alaska. doi: 10.3133/sim3340. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3340, pamphlet 196. [21]

Devonian - Cambrian
358.9 - 541 Ma



ID: 636681
Sedimentary; Sedimentary: undivided

Age: Paleozoic (358.9 - 541 Ma)

Description: Eastern Alaska, Yukon, Mackenzie region, Yukon-Tanana upland

Comments: Orogen, magmatic arc/suite; Gordey & Makepeace, 2003

Lithology: Sandstone, siltstone, shale, limestone or metamorphosed equivalent

Reference: J.C. Harrison, M.R. St-Onge, O.V. Petrov, S.I. Strelnikov, B.G. Lopatin, F.H. Wilson, S. Tella, D. Paul, T. Lynds, S.P. Shokalsky, C.K. Hults, S. Bergman, H.F. Jepsen, and A. Solli. Geological map of the Arctic. doi:10.4095/287868. Geological Survey of Canada Map 2159A. [2]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



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References

Asher, R.R., 1970, Geochemistry and geology, Boundary area, Fortymile district, Eagle A-1 quadrangle, Alaska: Alaska Division of Mines and Geology Geochemical Report 23, 32 p., 2 sheets, scale 1:63,360. Bundtzen, T.K., Swainbank, R.C., Deagen, J.R., and Moore, J.L., 1990, Alaska's mineral industry, 1989: Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys Special Report 44, 100 p. Burleigh, R.E., and Lear, K.G., 1994, Compilation of data for phase 1 of the mineral resource evaluation of the Bureau of Land Management Black River and Fortymile River subunits: U.S. Bureau of Mines Open-File Report 48-94, 116 p. Chapin, T., 1914, Placer mining in the Yukon-Tanana region: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 592, p. 357-362. Cobb, E.H., 1972, Metallic mineral resources map of the Eagle quadrangle, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-393, 1:250,000 scale, 1 sheet. Cobb, E.H., 1977, Summary of references to mineral occurrences in the Eagle quadrangle, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 77-845, 122 p. Eberlein, G.D., Chapman, R.M., Foster, H.L., and Gassaway, J.S., 1977, Map and table describing known metalliferous and selected nonmetalliferous mineral deposits in central Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 77-168-D, 132 p., 1 map sheet, scale 1:1,000,000. Ellsworth, C.E., and Davenport, R.W., 1913, Placer mining in the Yukon-Tanana region, in Brooks, A.H., ed., Mineral resources of Alaska, report on investigations in 1912: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 542-F, p. 203-222. Ellsworth, C.E., and Parker, G.L., 1911, Placer mining in the Yukon-Tanana region: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 480-F, p. 153-172. Foster, H.L., 1969, Reconnaissance geology of the Eagle A-1 and A-2 quadrangles, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1271-G, p. G1-G30. McConnell, R.G., 1905, Report on the Klondike gold fields: Geological Survey of Canada Annual Report, v. XII, 1901, Part B, 71 p. Mertie, J.B., Jr., 1938, Gold placers of the Fortymile, Eagle, and Circle districts, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 897-C, p. 133-261. Metz, P.A., and Hawkins, D.B., 1981, A summary of gold fineness values from Alaska placer deposits: Fairbanks, University of Alaska Mineral Research Laboratory Report No. 45, 63 p. Mortensen, J.K. (compiler), 1999, Yukonage--An isotopic age database for the Yukon Territory, in Gordey, S.P., and Makepeace, A.J., compilers, Yukon Digital Geology: Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Exploration and Geological Services Division, Yukon Region. Porter, E.A., 1912, Placer mining in the Fortymile, Eagle, and Seventymile River districts: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 520-G, p. 211-218. Prindle, L.M., 1908, Occurrence of gold in the Yukon-Tanana region, in Brooks, A.H., ed., Mineral Resources of Alaska, Report on progress of investigations in 1907: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 345, p. 179-186. Prindle, L.M., 1909, The Fortymile quadrangle, Yukon-Tanana region, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 375, 52 p. Smith, P.S., 1934, Mineral industry of Alaska in 1932: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 857-A, p. 1-91. Smith, P.S., 1934, Mineral industry of Alaska in 1933: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 864-A, p. 1-94. Smith, P.S., 1936, Mineral industry of Alaska in 1934: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 868-A, p. 1-91. Spurr, J.E., 1898, Geology of the Yukon gold district, Alaska, with an introductory chapter on the history and conditions of the district to 1897: U.S. Geological Survey Eighteenth Annual Report, Part 3, p. 87-392, 3 plates. Wiltse, M.A., 1978, Central Alaska stratiform Ag-Pb-Zn project 522: Anaconda Company report [unpublished], 174 p. (Report held by Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks, Alaska). Yeend, W.E., 1996, Gold placers of the historical Fortymile River region, Alaska: U.S. Geological survey Bulletin 2125, 75 p., 1 sheet, 1:250,000 scale.

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