IMPORTANT MESSAGE. We need your support now to keep mindat.org running. Click here to find out why.
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for Educators
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
StatisticsThe ElementsUsersBooks & MagazinesMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day Gallery

Golden Horn Mine, Iditarod District, Yukon-Koyukuk Borough, Alaska, USA

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
 
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 62° 26' 49'' North , 157° 55' 19'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 62.4469444444, -157.921944444


Location: The Golden Horn Mine is at an elevation of about 450 feet, about 0.5 mile southeast of Discovery Camp on Otter Creek. It is about 0.6 mile west-northwest of the center of section 12, T. 27 N., R. 47 W., of the Seward Meridian. The location is accurate. Cobb included the Golden Horn with other nearby lode prospects as locality 11 of Cobb (1972 [MF 363]); also described in Cobb (1976 [OFR 76-576]).
Geology: The Golden Horn deposit consists of a set of quartz-sulfide veins that contain free gold, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, lead-antimony sulfosalts, stibnite, sphalerite, and scheelite. The veins are in a zone that strikes N20-35E and dips steeply to vertically. The veins occur in irregularly distributed, quartz-filled shear zones in the Black Creek monzodiorite near its contact with shale and sandstone of the Upper Cretaceous, Kuskokwim Group (Mertie, 1936; Bull, 1988; Bundtzen and others, 1992). Secondary biotite in the Black Creek pluton has been dated at 63.0 Ma; this may also be the age of the hydrothermal mineralization as well as the age of emplacement of the intrusion (Bundtzen and others, 1992; Bundtzen and Miller, 1997; Miller, Bundtzen, and Gray, 2005). The system of veins varies from 10 to 100 feet thick and can be traced for about 650 feet along strikes. There are several other similar veins nearby including the Minnie Gulch and Mohawk prospects (Bundtzen and others, 1992). The Golden Horn deposit was discovered in 1921 by Rasmus Nielson; he sank a 50-foot shaft and drove 200 feet of drifts. Later, John Warren drove a 130-foot shaft. The deposit was mined by the Golden Horn Mining Company of W.E. Dunkle and Pardners Mines of New York in late 1934 and 1935. By 1938, the underground workings totaled about 1,800 feet in four levels of drifts, two shafts, and several crosscuts (Bundtzen and others, 1992). From 1977 to 1981, WGM, Inc., Union Carbide, and others drilled several diamond core and RC holes at the mine (but the total footage is not available). In 1984, Bull (1988) completed a University of Alaska masters thesis on the property based partly on studies of core from previous exploration work. During the 1980s to early 1990s, John Miscovich sluiced the upper zone of the vein system using hydraulic mining techniques and recovered free gold and gold-bearing, sulfide-scheelite concentrates. In 1988, Bundtzen and Miller produced a detailed geologic sketch of the Golden Horn prospect, which had been stripped by John Miscovich for mining purposes, and collected a number of chip-channel samples (Bundtzen and others, 1992). From 1997 to 2000, WGM Inc. carried out exploration work on the property. From 1922 to 1937, about 2,707 ounces of gold, 2,620 ounces of silver, 9,337 pounds of lead and 518 pounds of zinc were produced from the Golden Horn Mine. Based on examination of published and unpublished surface and subsurface exploration data, Bundtzen and others (1992) estimated that the Gold Horn deposit contained a minimum, inferred resource of 148,000 tons of material that contains 0.35 ounces of gold per ton and 75 ounces of silver per ton.
Workings: The Golden Horn deposit was discovered in 1921 by Rasmus Nielson; he sank a 50-foot shaft and drove 200 feet of drifts. Later, John Warren drove a 130-foot shaft. The deposit was mined by the Golden Horn Mining Company of W.E. Dunkle and Pardners Mines of New York in late 1934 and 1935. The principal vein averaged about 12 inches thick; it had sufficient grade to sustain a mining width of about 5 feet. The wall rocks of the veins were gold bearing, probably averaging about 0.2 ounce of gold per ton. Some narrow zones contained as much as 45 ounces of gold per ton and hand sorted material shipped to the U.S. Mint contained about 6 ounces of gold per ton. Mining conditions were, however, difficult and the operation did not remain profitable, especially since a 25 percent royalty had to be paid to the owners of the mine (John Miscovich, oral communication, 2002). The ore was not milled before shipping and a stockpile of probably several thousand tons of material remain that contain about an ounce of gold per ton. By 1938, the underground workings totaled about 1,800 feet in four levels of drifts, two shafts, and several crosscuts (Bundtzen and others, 1992). From 1977 to 1981, WGM, Inc., Union Carbide, and others drilled several diamond core and RC holes at the mine (but the total footage is not available). In 1984, Bull (1988) completed a University of Alaska masters thesis on the property based partly on studies of core from previous exploration work. During the 1980s to early 1990s, John Miscovich sluiced the upper zone of the vein system using hydraulic mining techniques and recovered free gold and gold-bearing, sulfide-scheelite concentrates. In 1988, Bundtzen and Miller produced a detailed geologic sketch of the Golden Horn prospect, which had been stripped by John Miscovich for mining purposes, and collected a number of chip-channel samples (Bundtzen and others, 1992). From 1997 to 2000, WGM Inc. carried out exploration work on the property.
Age: Secondary biotite in the host pluton is 63.0 Ma; this is possibly the age of the mineralization.
Alteration: The alteration in and near the veins is marked by tourmaline and chlorite; abundant secondary biotite in host pluton.
Production: The richest ore was mined on several underground levels beginning in 1922 and continued intermittently until about 1937. The main period of mining was in 1934 and 1935 by the Golden Horn Mining Co. The last ore shipment was in late 1937 (Maloney, 1962). From 1922 to 1937, about 2,707 ounces of gold, 2,620 ounces of silver, 9,337 pounds of lead and 518 pounds of zinc were produced from the Golden Horn Mine (Bundtzen and others, 1992). Free gold, and auriferous sulfide and scheelite concentrates were recovered and shipped to buyers intermittently from the 1980s to early 1990s by Miscovich Mining Company (John Miscovich oral communication, 1992).
Reserves: Based on examination of published and unpublished surface and subsurface exploration data, Bundtzen and others (1992) estimated that the Gold Horn deposit contained a minimum, inferred resource of 148,000 tons of material that contains 0.35 ounces of gold per ton and 75 ounces of silver per ton.

Commodities (Major) - Au, W; (Minor) - Ag, As, Hg, Sb
Development Status: Yes
Deposit Model: Polymetallic vein or Porphyry Au-Cu (Cox and Singer, 1986; models 22c and 20a).

Mineral List


9 valid minerals.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Maastrichtian - Tertiary
66 Ma
Felsic granitic rocks

Age: Paleocene (66 Ma)

Description: Small stocks and plutons of fine- to coarse-grained, phaneritic to hypidiomorphic, clinopyroxene-biotite +/- olivine monzonite, hornblende-clinopyroxene-biotite quartz monzonite, biotite syenite, biotite-hornblende granodiorite, biotite granite, and rare lampophyric rocks.

Lithology: Igneous

Reference: Wilson, F.H., Hults, C.P., Mull, C.G, and Karl, S.M. (compilers). Geologic map of Alaska. doi: 10.3133/sim3340. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3340, pamphlet 196. [21]

Late Cretaceous
66 - 100.5 Ma
Sedimentary; Slope and deep water

Age: Late Cretaceous (66 - 100.5 Ma)

Description: Interior western Alaska, Southwest Basin

Comments: Sedimentary basin; Wilson & Hults, unpublished compilation, 2007-08

Lithology: Shale, chert, iron-formation, greywacke, turbidite, argillaceous limestone, matrix-supported conglomerate or metamorphosed equivalent

Reference: J.C. Harrison, M.R. St-Onge, O.V. Petrov, S.I. Strelnikov, B.G. Lopatin, F.H. Wilson, S. Tella, D. Paul, T. Lynds, S.P. Shokalsky, C.K. Hults, S. Bergman, H.F. Jepsen, and A. Solli. Geological map of the Arctic. doi:10.4095/287868. Geological Survey of Canada Map 2159A. [2]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Bull, K.F., 1988, Genesis of the Golden Horn and related mineralization in the Flat Creek area, Alaska: Fairbanks, University of Alaska M.Sc. thesis, 300 p. Bundtzen, T.K., Cox, B.C., and Veach, N.C., 1987, Heavy mineral provenance studies in the Iditarod and Innoko districts, western Alaska: Process Mineralogy VII, The Metallurgical Society, p. 221-246. Cobb, E.H., 1972, Metallic mineral resources map of the Iditarod quadrangle, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-363, 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000. Cobb, E.H., 1976, Summary of references to mineral occurrences (other than mineral fuels and construction material) in the Iditarod and Ophir quadrangles, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 76-576, 101 p. Maloney, R.P., 1962, Investigation of mercury-antimony deposits near Flat, Yukon River region, Alaska: U.S. Bureau of Mines Report of Investigations RI 5991, 44 p. Mertie, J.B., Jr., 1936, Mineral deposits of the Ruby-Kuskokwim region, Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 864-C, p. 115-245. Miller, M.L., and Bundtzen, T.K., 1994, Generalized geologic map of the Iditarod quadrangle, Alaska showing potassium-argon, major oxide, trace element, fossil, paleocurrent, and archeological sample localities: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-2219-A, 48 pages; 1 sheet, scale 1:250,000. Miller, M.L., Bundtzen, T.K., and Gray, J.E., 2005, Mineral resource assessment of the Iditarod quadrangle, west-central Alaska: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-2219-B, scale 1:250,000, pamphlet.

Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2018, except where stated. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: September 22, 2018 10:31:48 Page generated: October 12, 2017 02:08:43
Go to top of page