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Wagner; Boston King; Salmon Creek Gold Mining Co. Mine, Juneau District, Juneau Borough, Alaska, USA

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Location: This mine is adjacent to lower Salmon Creek at an elevation of about 50 feet. It is 2 miles west-southwest of Salmon Creek reservoir and 1/4 mile northeast of Gastineau Channel, in about the center of the N1/2 section 9, T. 41 S., R. 67 E. of the Copper River Meridian. The location is accurate.
Geology: The Wagner Mine consists of over 1,600 feet of underground workings including 3 adits and a shaft at least 250 feet deep (Eakin, 1915). The mine processed gold ore with a 20-ton tubular mill and a 15-stamp mill but there is no documentation of the amount of gold produced (Redman and others, 1989). The deposit was discovered in 1889. It consists of multiple quartz veins along the contact between black phyllite and an altered diorite dike. The veins are up to 4 feet thick and contain arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, galena, sphalerite and tetrahedrite. No data on metal grades are available (Eakin, 1915). This mine is in the Juneau Gold Belt, which consists of more than 200 gold-quartz-vein deposits that have produced nearly 7 million ounces of gold. These gold-bearing mesothermal quartz vein systems form a zone 160 km long by 5 to 8 km wide along the western margin of the Coast Mountains. The vein systems are in or near shear zones adjacent to west-verging, mid-Cretaceous thrust faults. The veins are hosted by diverse, variably metamorphosed, sedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks. From the Coast Mountains batholith westward, the host rocks include mixed metasedimentary and metavolcanic sequences of Carboniferous and older, Permian and Triassic, and Jurassic-Cretaceous age. The sequences are juxtaposed along mid-Cretaceous thrust faults (Miller and others, 1994). The sequences are intruded by mid-Cretaceous to middle Eocene plutons, mainly diorite, tonalite, granodiorite, quartz monzonite, and granite. Sheetlike tonalite plutons emplaced just east of the Juneau Gold Belt and undeformed granite and granodiorite bodies that are emplaced farther to the east are between 55 and 48 Ma (Gehrels and others, 1991). The structural grain of the belt is defined by northwest-striking, moderately to steeply northeast-dipping, penetrative foliation that developed between Cretaceous and Eocene time (Miller and others, 1994). The majority of the veins in the Juneau Gold Belt strike northwest. Isotopic dates indicate that the auriferous veins in the Juneau Gold Belt formed between 56 and 55 Ma (Miller and others, 1994; Goldfarb and others, 1997).
Workings: The Wagner Mine consists of over 1,600 feet of underground workings including 3 adits and a shaft at least 250 feet deep (Eakin, 1915). The deposit was discovered in 1889.
Age: Isotopic dates indicate that the auriferous veins in the Juneau Gold Belt formed between 56 and 55 Ma (Miller and others, 1994; Goldfarb and others, 1997).
Production: The mine processed gold ore in a 20-ton tubular mill and a 15-stamp mill, but there is no documentation of the amount of gold produced (Redman and others, 1989).

Commodities (Major) - Ag, Au, Cu, Pb, Zn
Development Status: Undetermined.
Deposit Model: Low-sulfide Au-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a)

Mineral List



8 entries listed. 8 valid minerals.

The above list contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Eakin, H.M., 1915, Mining in the Juneau region: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 622-C, p. 95-102 Gehrels, G.E., McClelland, W.C., Samson, S.D., and Patchett, P.J., 1991, U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons from a continental margin assemblage in the northern Coast Mountains, southeastern Alaska: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 28, no. 8, p.1285-1300. Goldfarb, R.J., Miller, L.D., Leach, D.L., and Snee, L.W, 1997, Gold deposits in metamorphic rocks in Alaska, in Goldfarb, R.J., and Miller, L.D., eds., Mineral Deposits of Alaska: Economic Geology Monograph 9, p. 151-190. Miller, L.D., Goldfarb, R.J., Gehrels, G,E., and Snee, L.W., 1994, Genetic links among fluid cycling, vein formation, regional deformation, and plutonism in the Juneau gold belt, southeastern Alaska: Geology, v. 22, p. 203-206. Redman, E.C., Maas, K.M., Kurtak, J.M., and Miller, L.D., 1989, Bureau of Mines Mineral Investigations in the Juneau Mining District, Alaska, 1984-1988, Volume 2--Detailed mine, prospect, and mineral occurrence descriptions, Section D, Juneau Gold Belt Subarea: U.S. Bureau of Mines Special Publication, 424 p.

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