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Juan complex, Kambalda Nickel mines, Kambalda, Coolgardie Shire, Western Australia, Australia

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 31° 10' 3'' South , 121° 39' 12'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): -31.16765,121.65345
GeoHash:G#: qdqw8q176
Locality type:Complex
Köppen climate type:BSk : Cold semi-arid (steppe) climate


Numerous ore shoots. Chaotic variable ore structure, with variable thickness, irregular contacts with the Footwall metabasalt, irregular ore distribution, and structure, variable dips. Disseminated ore more common than massive.

Layered massive ore contains 2 to 10 metre thick, lensoidal pentlandite aggregates set in a foliated matrix of polycrystal pyrrhotite, constituting 90% of the massive ore volume. In addition is minor pyrite, all as discontinuous layers, and scattered lenses.

Pyrite lenses are more abundant in complex structural areas, with associated chalcopyrite, and minor talc, chlorite, carbonate, amphibolite, quartz, chrome spinel, and magnetite. Rare arsenopyrite and hematite.

Ore shoots come in two forms. (1) blebby ore 2-10 metres thick, 6 to 25 metres above the contact zone as pyrrhotite-pentlandite pseudomorphed by supergene violarite-nickel rich pyrite. (2) massive matrix and disseminated contact ore, containing millerite, pyrite, violarite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and gersdorffite. Millerite is found up to 5cms in diameter, while the massive ore is veined and fractured by siderite.

Massive and matrix ore contains also tremolite, amphibolite, minor chlorite rimmed by magnetite. Overlying this is talc-serpentine-carbonate rock.



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39 valid minerals. 2 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

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Australia

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References

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Marston, R. J., Kay, B. D. (1980) The Distribution, Petrology, and Genesis of Nickel Ores at the Juan Complex, Kambalda, Western Australia, Economic Geology (1980) Vol. 75, No. 4, pp.546-565.
Marston, R.J. (1984) Nickel Mineralization in Western Australia. Mineral Resources Bulletin 14, Geological Survey of Western Australia, 291p. 

 
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