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Aosta Valley, Italy

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Location is approximate, based on center of defined region.
 
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 45° North , 7° East (est.)
Other regions containing this locality:The Alps, Europe
Neighbouring regions:
Name(s) in local language(s):Valle d'Aosta (Vallée d'Aoste), Italia


This autonomous region, whose official name is Regione Autonoma Valle d'Aosta in Italian and Région Autonome Vallée d'Aoste in French, is the smallest and least densely populated region of Italy. It is the only Italian region that is not sub-divided into provinces. Italian and French are official languages, though much of the native population also speak Valdôtain (locally called patois), a dialect of Franco-Provençal (Arpitan). Walser German (locally called Titsch or Töitschu) is spoken in the Lys Valley (Gressoney-Saint-Jean, Gressoney-La-Trinité, and Issime).

Until 1946 Aosta Valley was a province of Piedmont [for this reason the epidote-group mineral first described from the Prabornaz mine was named piemontite]; only in 1948 Aosta Valley became a self-governing region.

Note on toponymy: since 1536 Modern French is adopted as official language, however the pronunciation for many local toponyms differs from that of the Standard French. In particular:
- the final z, that is not pronounced, is a graphic expedient to indicate that the words take stress on the penultimate syllable. Therefore, Prabornaz is pronounced as Prabòrna, Bionaz as Biòna, Perloz as Pèrlo, Arbaz as 'Arba, etc.;
- the semivowel y is pronounced in toponyms such as Antey-Saint-André, Aymavilles, Gressoney-La-Trinité, Gressoney-Saint-Jean, and Pontey;
- the final s is pronounced in toponyms such as Ayas, Donnas, Fénis, and Nus (in Verrès the final s is pronounced, analogously to Standard French for the proper names that end in -ès);
- in the toponym Doues the vowel "e" is pronounced (on the contrary, this toponym should sound as Dou in Standard French).

Note: collecting is restricted [the attestation of registration in the regional register of mineral searchers and collectors is required] - in some protected areas it is strictly forbidden and subject to special authorisation (see website below), such as: Gran Paradiso National Park, Monte Bianco (Mont Blanc) area approximately north of Courmayeur, Monte Avic Natural Park, Servette mine, Cogne mine, Chamousira (Brusson) mine, etc.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Actinolite

Aegirine

Aegirine-augite

'Aeschynite'

Aeschynite-(Y)

Albite

'Albite-Anorthite Series'

Allanite-(Ce)

'Allanite Group'

Almandine

'Almandine-Pyrope Series'

Altaite

Aluminoceladonite

Alumovesuvianite

Amphibole Supergroup

var: Byssolite

Analcime

Anatase

Andradite

var: Demantoid

var: Hydroandradite

var: Topazolite

'Andradite-Grossular Series'

Anglesite

Anilite

Ankerite

Annite

Antigorite

'Apatite'

Aragonite

'Ardennite'

Ardennite-(As)

Ardennite-(V)

Arfvedsonite

Arseniopleite

Arsenopyrite

Artinite

'Asbestos'

Augite

Autunite

Axinite-(Fe)

'Axinite Group'

Azurite

Barroisite

Baryte

Bastnäsite-(Ce)

Bavenite

Berthierite

Bertrandite

Beryl

'Biotite'

Birnessite

Bismuth

Bismutite

Bornite

Boulangerite

Bournonite

Braunite (TL)

Brochantite

Brookite

Brucite

Brugnatellite

Calcite

'Calcium Amphibole Subgroup'

Calderite

Celadonite

Celestine

Cerianite-(Ce)

Cerussite

'Chabazite'

Chabazite-Ca

Chabazite-Na

Chalcanthite

Chalcocite

Chalcopyrite

Chamosite

'Chlorite Group'

Chloritoid

Chondrodite

Chromite

Chrysocolla

Chrysotile

Clinochlore

'Clinochrysotile'

Clinohumite

var: Titanclinohumite

Clinozoisite

Coalingite

Coesite

Copiapite

Copper

Cordierite

Corundum

Cosalite

Covellite

Crichtonite

'Crossite'

Cryptomelane

Cubanite

Cummingtonite

Cuprite

Danburite

Deerite

Diamond

Digenite

Diopside

var: Diallage

var: Schefferite

var: Violan (FRL)

Djurleite

Dolomite

var: Ferroan Dolomite

Dravite

Eckermannite

Edenite

Enargite

Epidote

Epistilbite

Fayalite

'Fayalite-Forsterite Series'

'Feldspar Group'

Fergusonite-(Y)

Ferri-ghoseite

'Ferro-eckermannite'

Ferro-glaucophane (TL)

Ferro-hornblende

Fluorapatite

Fluorite

Forsterite

Gadolinite-(Y)

Galena

'Garnet'

Glaucophane

Goethite

Gold

Graphite

Grossular

var: Hessonite

Gypsum

Hausmannite

Hematite

Hercynite

'Heulandite'

Heulandite-Ca

'Högbomite'

Hollandite

'Hornblende'

Huttonite

Hydromagnesite

Hydrowoodwardite

Hydroxylapatite

Hydroxylclinohumite

Ilmenite

Iron

Jacobsite

Jadeite

Kainosite-(Y)

Kasolite

'K Feldspar'

'var: Adularia'

Kutnohorite

Kyanite

Langite

Lansfordite

Laumontite

Lawsonite

Leucophoenicite

'Limonite'

Lizardite

Macfallite

Mackinawite

Magnesiobeltrandoite-2N3S (TL)

Magnesiochloritoid

Magnesiochromite

Magnesio-riebeckite

Magnesite

Magnetite

Malachite

Manganberzeliite

Manganiandrosite-(Ce) (TL)

Manganite

Manganocummingtonite

Marcasite

Melanterite

'Mica Group'

Microcline

var: Hyalophane

Milarite

Molybdenite

'Monazite'

Monazite-(Ce)

Morenosite

Muscovite

var: Alurgite

var: Fuchsite

var: Sericite

Neotocite

Nesquehonite

Nickelhexahydrite

'Olivine'

Omphacite

var: Chrome-Omphacite

Orpiment

Orthobrannerite

Orthoclase

Paragonite

Pectolite

Pentlandite

Perovskite

Phenakite

'Phengite'

Phlogopite

Piemontite (TL)

var: Strontian Piemontite

Piemontite-(Sr)

Powellite

Prehnite

Priderite

Pseudobrookite

Pyrite

Pyroaurite

Pyrolusite

Pyromorphite

Pyrophanite

'Pyroxene Group'

Pyroxmangite

Pyrrhotite

Quartz

var: Amethyst

var: Smoky Quartz

Ramsbeckite

Ranciéite

Realgar

Retgersite

Rhodochrosite

Rhodonite

Richterite

Riebeckite

'Roméite Group' (FRL)

Rutile

'Sagenite'

Saponite

Sarkinite

Scheelite

Scolecite

Siderite

Sillimanite

Slavíkite

'Sodium Amphibole Subgroup'

Spessartine

Sphalerite

Spinel

Stibnite

'Stilbite'

Stilpnomelane

Strontiomelane (TL)

Sulphur

Sursassite

Synchysite-(Ce)

'Synchysite Group'

Synchysite-(Nd)

Talc

Tephroite

Tetrahedrite

Thomsonite-Ca

Thorianite

Thorite

Thortveitite

Tilasite

Tiragalloite

Titanite

var: Greenovite

Todorokite

'Tourmaline'

Tremolite

Troilite

Tweddillite

Ulvöspinel

'UM2005-02-AsO:AlHPScSi'

'Unnamed (La Arsenate)'

Uraninite

Uranophane

Uranophane-β

Uvarovite

Vesuvianite

Violarite

Wallkilldellite

Winchite

Wollastonite

Woodwardite

Wulfenite

Wüstite

Xenotime-(Y)

Zaratite

Zircon

Zoisite


240 valid minerals. 6 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals. 2 (FRL) - first recorded locality of unapproved mineral/variety/etc.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Localities in this Region

Italy

This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Nicolis de Robilant, E.B. [Nicolis di Robilant, S.B.] (1784-85) Essai géographique suivi d’une topographie souterraine, minéralogique et d’une docimasie des Etats de S. M. [Sa Majesté] en terre ferme. Mémoires de l’Académie Royale des Sciences, Turin, 1 (1786, pt.1), 191-304.
Nicolis de Robilant, E.B. [Nicolis di Robilant, S.B.] (1786-87) Description particulière du Duché d’Aoste, suivie d’un essai sur deux minières des anciens Romains et d’un supplément à la théorie des montagnes et des mines. Mémoires de l’Académie Royale des Sciences, Turin, 3 (1788), 254-274.
Barelli, V. (1835) Cenni di statistica mineralogica degli Stati di S.M. il Re di Sardegna, ovvero Catalogo ragionato della raccolta formatasi presso l'Azienda Generale dell'Interno. Tipografia Giuseppe Fodratti, Torino, 686 pp.
Jervis, G. (1873) I tesori sotterranei dell'Italia. Vol. 1: Regioni delle Alpi. Ermanno Loescher, Torino, XV+410 pp.
Baretti, M. (1877) Notice géologique et minéralogique de la Vallé d’Aoste. In: Gorret, A., Bich, C., Guide de la Vallée d’Aoste. F. Casanova Libraire-Éditeur, Turin, pages 22-47.
Jervis, G. (1881) I tesori sotterranei dell'Italia. Vol. 3: Regioni delle Isole. Sardegna e Sicilia. Addenda ai precedenti volumi. Ermanno Loescher, Torino, XXII+539 pp.
Del Caldo, A., Moro, C., Gramaccioli, C.M., Boscardin, M. (1973) Guida ai minerali. Fratelli Fabbri Editori, Milano, 208 pp.
De Michele, V. (1974) Guida mineralogica d'Italia. Istituto Geografico De Agostini, Novara, 2 vol., 408 pp.
Ravagnani, D. (1974) I giacimenti uraniferi italiani e i loro minerali. Gruppo Mineralogico Lombardo - Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, Milano, 188 pp.
Bottino, G., Mastrangelo, F., Natale, P., Zucchetti, S. (1975) I - Alpi Occidentali (Piemonte, Valle d’Aosta). In: Castaldo, G., Stampanoni, G., (eds.), Memoria illustrativa della Carta mineraria d'Italia alla scala 1:1.000.000. Memorie per servire alla descrizione della Carta geologica d'Italia, 14, 1-37.
Gramaccioli, C.M. (1975) Minerali alpini e prealpini. Istituto Italiano Edizioni Atlas, Bergamo, 2 vol., 472 pp.
Castello, P. (1981) Inventario delle mineralizzazioni a magnetite, ferro-rame e manganese del Complesso Piemontese dei Calcescisti con Pietre Verdi in Valle d’Aosta. Ofioliti, 6, 1, 5-46.
Mastrangelo, F., Natale, P., Zucchetti, S. (1983) Quadro giacimentologico e metallogenico delle Alpi Occidentali italiane. Bollettino della Associazione Mineraria Subalpina, 20, 1-2, 203-248.
Lorenzini, C. (1995) Le antiche miniere della Valle d'Aosta. Musumeci Editore, Quart (Aosta), 165 pp.
Castello, P., Ferronato, R. (2004) Cristalli e minerali in Valle d'Aosta. Catalogo della Mostra organizzata dalla Regione Autonoma Valle d’Aosta e dal Gruppo Mineralogico Valdostano “Les Amis di Berrio”, tenutasi al Museo Archeologico di Aosta dal 12 giugno al 24 ottobre 2004. Tipografia Valdostana, Aosta, 156 pp.
Piccoli, G.C., Maletto, G., Bosio, P., Lombardo, B. (2007) Minerali del Piemonte e della Valle d'Aosta. Associazione Amici del Museo "F. Eusebio" di Alba, L'Artigiana Srl - Azienda Grafica, Alba (Cuneo), 607 pp.

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