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Point Fermin, San Pedro, Los Angeles Co., California, USA

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Bluish schist exposed in sea cliff at Point Fermin

Point Fermin, San Pedro, Los Angeles Co., California, USA
Bluish schist exposed in sea cliff at Point Fermin

Point Fermin, San Pedro, Los Angeles Co., California, USA
Bluish schist exposed in sea cliff at Point Fermin

Point Fermin, San Pedro, Los Angeles Co., California, USA
 
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 33° 42' 30'' North , 118° 17' 41'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 33.70833,-118.29472


An occurrence at the base of the sea cliffs.
Outcropping of blue mica schist, a part of the catalina schist exposed in the cliffs below and hills above Point Fermin. The blue schist can be found as layers and pods inside the sandstone and shale. Micro crystals of various minerals are found in vugs inside solid veins as well as filling in fractures and surface coating on the dense schist blocks.

From Pemberton: "Microscopic crystals of dolomite, partly derived from organic material and with an unusual habit, occur with tar (bitumen) as cement in some Miocene sands of the Point Fermin sea cliffs."

From Pemberton: "The base of the cliff at Point Fermin Park is a sandstone comprised of glaucophane grains. Pebbles of nearly pure glaucophane are found in the sandstone."

Mineral List


8 valid minerals.

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Late Pleistocene - Middle Pleistocene
0.0117 - 0.781 Ma
Old shallow marine deposits on wave-cut surface

Age: Pleistocene (0.0117 - 0.781 Ma)

Description: Poorly sorted, moderately permeable, reddish-brown, interfingered strandline, beach, estuarine and colluvial deposits composed of siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate. These deposits rest on the now emergent wave cut abrasion platforms preserved by regional uplift. Locally may include older alluvium.

Comments: Older surficial deposits have upper surfaces that are capped by moderate to well-developed pedogenic soils.

Reference: Saucedo, G.J., H.G. Greene, M.P. Kennedy, S.P. Bezore. Geologic Map of the Long Beach 30’ x 60’ Quadrangle, California. Department of Conservation, California Geological Survey. [116]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Sharp, W.E. (1959) Minerals from Los Angeles County, California. Printed privately, Los Angeles, California: 3.

Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 403.
Sharp, W.E. (1959) Minerals from Los Angeles County, California. Printed privately, Los Angeles, California: 3-4.

Spotts, John H. and Silverman, S.R. (1966) Organic dolomite from Point Fermin, California. American Mineralogist: 51: 1144-1155.

Carnahan, V. (1967), Minerals of Los Angeles County, part 1, Catalina Island, Palos Verdes and Soledad Basin: Los Angeles County Natural History Museum Alliance Quarterly: 6(2): 28.

Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 220, 266, 277.

Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 178.

Schneider, H. (1927) A study of glauconite. Journal of Geology: 35: 296-298.
Sharp, W.E. (1959) Minerals from Los Angeles County, California. Printed privately, Los Angeles, California: 3-4.

Spotts, John H. and Silverman, S.R. (1966) Organic dolomite from Point Fermin, California. American Mineralogist: 51: 1144-1155.

Carnahan, V. (1967), Minerals of Los Angeles County, part 1, Catalina Island, Palos Verdes and Soledad Basin: Los Angeles County Natural History Museum Alliance Quarterly: 6(2): 28.

Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 220, 266, 277.

Woodford, A.O. (1924), The Catalina metamorphic facies of the Franciscan series: University of California, Department of Geological Sciences Bulletin: 15: 49-68; [… (abstract): Geol. Zentralbl., Band 33: 98 (1926)]: 54, 55.

Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 69, 238.
Schneider, H. (1927) A study of glauconite. Journal of Geology: 35: 296-298.

Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 429.

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