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Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA

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Cracked Ohio Shale Concretion, Columbus, Ohio

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Whole mess of Ohio Shale Concretions

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Ohio Shale Concretion, Columbus, Ohio

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Cracked Ohio Shale Concretion, Columbus, Ohio

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Whole mess of Ohio Shale Concretions

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Ohio Shale Concretion, Columbus, Ohio

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Cracked Ohio Shale Concretion, Columbus, Ohio

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Whole mess of Ohio Shale Concretions

Bill Moose Run, Columbus, Franklin Co., Ohio, USA
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 40° 4' 3'' North , 83° 1' 53'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 40.06750,-83.03139
GeoHash:G#: dphgyw46h
Köppen climate type:Dfa : Hot-summer humid continental climate


Bill Moose Ravine is one of a series of ravines that drain into the Olentangy River in the City of Columbus. All of these ravines cut into the Ohio Shale, found in the Devonian bedrock exposed in a strip in the center of Ohio, running from Adams/Scioto counties in the south, up through the heavily populated counties along the shore of Lake Erie.

Sources describing minerals in the Ohio Shale in the northern part of the state can be applied to the Ohio Shale in general: it is a similar geology. Thus a similar pattern of mineralized concretions (containing ferroan dolomite, calcite, quartz, baryte, and aragonite), pyrite disks, and mineral efflorescences (alunogen, botryogen, copiapite, epsomite, gypsum, hexahydrite, melanterite, ferroan pickeringite, and rozenite) can be found in central Ohio exposures of the Ohio shale. In addition, chert nodules weathered out of limestone can be found in the stream beds.

Bull Run Ravine runs about 3 miles from I-71, just north of the Morse Rd. exit, west to the Olentangy River. It is easily accessible at Delawanda Park (the lat/long below), in the woods behind the game fields. Moving east, the ravine runs behind the Graceland shopping center. The Run passes under High Street, through an apartment complex, and onto the grounds of the Ohio State School for the Blind and Ohio State School for the Deaf, then pnarrows near I-71.

Concretions occur in the exposed shale, and chunks of concretions can be found in the stream bed. A few monster concretions can be found in the woods in Delawanda Park. Efflorescences from the breakdown of pyrite in the Ohio Shale coat some of the exposed shale. Chert nodules are also common and some interesting glacial erratics can also be found in the stream such as unakite granite containing epidote, but the source of these rocks is probably in Canada.

This is an urban site, and much of the property is private. The exception is the mouth of Bill Moose Run in Delawanda Park, which is quite woodsy and undeveloped for such an urban site.

The Run is named after Bill Moose, known as the last of the Wyandot Indians who originally lived in central Ohio. After multiple displacements of his people westward, Bill Moose returned to the Columbus area, where he lived near the area where Bill Moose Run crosses Indanola Avenue.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


21 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Alunogen
Formula: Al2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
Reference: Van King
Aragonite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Van King
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: Van King
Botryogen
Formula: MgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
Reference: Van King
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Description: (Glacial erratic, not indigenous to site.)
Reference: John Krygier specimens
'Chert'
Reference: Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Copiapite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+4(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
Reference: Van King
Dolomite
Formula: CaMg(CO3)2
Reference: Van King
Epsomite
Formula: MgSO4 · 7H2O
Reference: Van King
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Reference: Coogan, Allan H. Ohio's Surface Rocks and Sediments; Chapter 3 in Fossils of Ohio, edited by Rodney M. Feldmann; Ohio Geological Survey, Bulletin 70, 1996.
Gypsum
Formula: CaSO4 · 2H2O
Reference: Van King
Hexahydrite
Formula: MgSO4 · 6H2O
Reference: Van King
Marcasite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Eric Mumper & Karen Fryer, Iron-Sulfide Concretions of the Ohio Shale: Glimpses Of Deep Subseafloor Microbial Ecosystems of the Late Devonian. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 44, No. 5, p. 74 (https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2012NC/finalprogram/abstract_202972.htm)
Melanterite
Formula: Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Reference: Van King
Millerite
Formula: NiS
Description: (Glacial erratic, not indigenous to site.)
Reference: John Krygier specimens
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Reference: John Krygier specimens
Pickeringite
Formula: MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Reference: Van King
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Van King
Quartz var: Chalcedony
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Rozenite
Formula: FeSO4 · 4H2O
Reference: Van King
Whewellite
Formula: Ca(C2O4) · H2O
Reference: Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Marcasite2.EB.10aFeS2
Millerite2.CC.20NiS
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Chalcedony4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
'Aragonite'5.AB.15CaCO3
'Calcite'5.AB.05CaCO3
Dolomite5.AB.10CaMg(CO3)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
'Alunogen'7.CB.45Al2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
'Baryte'7.AD.35BaSO4
'Botryogen'7.DC.25MgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
Copiapite7.DB.35Fe2+Fe3+4(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
Epsomite7.CB.40MgSO4 · 7H2O
Gypsum7.CD.40CaSO4 · 2H2O
Hexahydrite7.CB.25MgSO4 · 6H2O
Melanterite7.CB.35Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Pickeringite7.CB.85MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Rozenite7.CB.15FeSO4 · 4H2O
Group 10 - Organic Compounds
Whewellite10.AB.45Ca(C2O4) · H2O
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Chert-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Millerite2.8.16.1NiS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Marcasite2.12.2.1FeS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Dolomite14.2.1.1CaMg(CO3)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4·xH2O
Epsomite29.6.11.1MgSO4 · 7H2O
Gypsum29.6.3.1CaSO4 · 2H2O
Hexahydrite29.6.8.1MgSO4 · 6H2O
Melanterite29.6.10.1Fe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Rozenite29.6.6.1FeSO4 · 4H2O
AB2(XO4)4·H2O
Pickeringite29.7.3.1MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
A2(XO4)3·H2O
Alunogen29.8.6.1Al2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
Group 31 - HYDRATED SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Botryogen31.9.6.1MgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
Miscellaneous
Copiapite31.10.5.1Fe2+Fe3+4(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
Group 50 - ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
Oxalates
Whewellite50.1.1.1Ca(C2O4) · H2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
Aragonite-CaCO3
'Chert'-
Quartz
var: Chalcedony
-SiO2

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H AlunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
H BotryogenMgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
H CopiapiteFe2+Fe43+(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
H EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
H HexahydriteMgSO4 · 6H2O
H MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
H RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
H WhewelliteCa(C2O4) · H2O
CCarbon
C AragoniteCaCO3
C CalciteCaCO3
C DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
C WhewelliteCa(C2O4) · H2O
OOxygen
O AlunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
O AragoniteCaCO3
O BaryteBaSO4
O BotryogenMgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
O CalciteCaCO3
O Quartz (var: Chalcedony)SiO2
O CopiapiteFe2+Fe43+(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
O DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
O EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
O HexahydriteMgSO4 · 6H2O
O MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
O QuartzSiO2
O RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
O WhewelliteCa(C2O4) · H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg BotryogenMgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
Mg DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Mg EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
Mg HexahydriteMgSO4 · 6H2O
Mg PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
AlAluminium
Al AlunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
Al PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
SiSilicon
Si Quartz (var: Chalcedony)SiO2
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si QuartzSiO2
SSulfur
S AlunogenAl2(SO4)3 · 17H2O
S BaryteBaSO4
S BotryogenMgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S CopiapiteFe2+Fe43+(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
S EpsomiteMgSO4 · 7H2O
S GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
S HexahydriteMgSO4 · 6H2O
S MarcasiteFeS2
S MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
S MilleriteNiS
S PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
S PyriteFeS2
S RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
CaCalcium
Ca AragoniteCaCO3
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DolomiteCaMg(CO3)2
Ca GypsumCaSO4 · 2H2O
Ca WhewelliteCa(C2O4) · H2O
FeIron
Fe BotryogenMgFe3+(SO4)2(OH) · 7H2O
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe CopiapiteFe2+Fe43+(SO4)6(OH)2 · 20H2O
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe MarcasiteFeS2
Fe MelanteriteFe2+(H2O)6SO4 · H2O
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe RozeniteFeSO4 · 4H2O
NiNickel
Ni MilleriteNiS
CuCopper
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Paleozoic
251.902 - 541 Ma



ID: 3187973
Paleozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Phanerozoic (251.902 - 541 Ma)

Lithology: Sedimentary rocks

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Devonian
358.9 - 419.2 Ma



ID: 2725181
Delaware Limestone

Age: Devonian (358.9 - 419.2 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Delaware Limestone

Description: Limestone; gray to brown; thin to massive bedded; argillaceous partings, nodules and layers, carbonaceous, petroliferous odor; as much as 45 feet thick.

Lithology: Major:{limestone}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Barth, Vincent D. (1974), "Formation Of Concretions Occurring In The Ohio Shale Along The Olentangy River." Ohio Journal of Science: 75(3).
Carlson, Ernest H. (1991), Minerals of Ohio. Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Carlson, Ernest H. (2002), Jerret Whitford. "Occurrence And Mineralogy Of Efflorescence In Late Devonian Black Shales, North-Central Ohio." GSA Meeting.
Carlson, Ernest H., et al (2009), "Mineralogy and Paragenesis of Large Dolostone Septaria in the Late Devonian Huron Shale, North-Central Ohio." Rocks and Minerals:,84 (March/April).
Vasichko, Joe ( ), Septarian Minerals of the Huron River near Lamereaux Road Bridge, Monroeville, Huron Co., Ohio.

External Links



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