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Schoonmaker Mine (Cramer Mine), Strickland pegmatite (Strickland-Cramer Quarry; Strickland-Cramer Mine; Strickland-Cramer Feldspar-Mica Quarries), Collins Hill, Portland, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Schoonmaker Mine (Cramer Mine)Mine
Strickland pegmatite (Strickland-Cramer Quarry; Strickland-Cramer Mine; Strickland-Cramer Feldspar-Mica Quarries)Pegmatite (Dormant)
Collins HillHill
Portland- not defined -
Middlesex Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 35' 34'' North , 72° 35' 31'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Cromwell13,750 (2017)4.4km
Portland5,862 (2017)4.6km
Middletown46,756 (2017)5.9km
Lake Pocotopaug3,436 (2017)6.8km
East Hampton2,691 (2017)7.7km


Located in the Middletown Pegmatite District comprising a swarm of Permian (~260 mya) pegmatite dikes; locally in a north-trending zone, mostly in the Ordovician Collins Hill Formation; but dikes are also present in eastward adjacent Ordovician Glastonbury Gneiss and westward adjacent Ordovician Middletown Formation.

An underground mine in the northern part of the Strickland pegmatite. It was a separate operation and for most of its life was not physically connected to the more famous Strickland quarry and mine to the immediate south and in the same pegmatite. Mostly a mica mine, some feldspar and a little beryl production. The northernmost large dump around the Strickland pegmatite is from this mine. Specimens from that dump should be attributed to this mine and not the Strickland Quarry. The difference is largely academic anyway because they both mined the same pegmatite, the mineralogy, pegmatite zoning, and host rocks of the Strickland Quarry and Schoonmaker Mine are similar. Any specimen can be generically attributed to the Strickland pegmatite. Minerals from host rocks included in list.

The mine was worked from July 1933 to 1945. Charles Cramer leased it to A. O. Schoonmaker Co. of New York City under the name Connecticut Mica & Mining Co. (Willard Northrop operator). Shaft was initially sunk to 120 feet. Mined mostly by stoping updip from the base of the shaft until 1942. Then they sunk winzes to stope lower levels until 1945.

Bartsch (1940) gave this early account:

The material on the dumps was bright and clean after the previous day's downpour and many fine minerals were plainly visible. The new waste material brought to light many minerals that have been listed as rare. An excellent specimen of amblygonite was found, also some nice crystals of bertrandite in cavities in feldspar, many fine pieces of pink beryl showing the usual zoning, some very fine specimens of deep orange-red lithiophilite in quartz, black sphalerite xls in quartz and an unusually large cavity filled with salmon-red rhodochrosite with masses of micro xls.

The usual minerals of this locality are now available in excellent material with the exception of lepidolite which seems to be scarce at the present time and this also accounts for the scarcity of colored tourmalines. Spodumene is also uncommon except for its alteration product pinite which is plentiful in various shades of green and brown.

All of the above mentioned material was found on the Schoonmaker dump as this is the only operation now working.


Little (1942) also gives one of the few written accounts of collecting there:

One of the finest minerals of especial (sic) interest that was found at the mine last summer was amblygonite, and it was a large size block of white or pinkish color and quite pure. But it looked very much like the albaite (sic) that was so plentiful there, and as amblygonite had never been reported from that mine, doubt was had as to its identity, so only a few pieces were broken off and taken home for further examination. On testing for intumescence, etc., it was found to be amblygonite, and within a few days another trip was made to obtain the rest of the specimen, but on reaching the place it was found to be gone. Probably some other collector had recognized it and taken it away. Subsequently two more fairly good specimens were found these having a small amount of light green tourmaline with amblygonite.

Soon after this, lithiophilite began to appear on the dump. This was in albaite (sic) with some spodumene and lepidolite, and mostly of a deep reddish brown color, though some was of a lighter brown. It was found sparingly for about a month, and since then none has been seen. Incidentally it might be mentioned that each of the common minerals found at this mine seemed to appear for a short time and then were never seen again, as though they only occurred in small amounts that were soon exhausted, or possibly in veins which were cut across and passed by.

During September and October much interesting material was thrown out on the dump. Fluorite was found in two forms; as dark purple cleavage pieces, and as nodules that were covered with a grey film, but that fluoresced a beautiful lavender blue. The cleavage pieces were not fluorescent. The fluorite nodules were generally accompanied by bright cubes of pyrite which varied in size up to 1/2 inch on the faces. Some of the specimens had the cubes of pyrite spread thickly over a base of crystallized albaite (sic), the crystals of albaite (sic) being about the same size as those of the pyrite, making very showy specimens. All these latter specimens appeared to have been formed in cavities.

Late in the fall a considerable amount of gemmy pink and green tourmaline was found. Some of the crystals had a deep pink center and were colorless on the outside, and some were pink at one end and green on the other. These latter were broken across, at least every quarter inch, and the two colors seemed to be end to end instead of grading into each other. Some occurred in an unusual form, as pellets of a quarter inch or more in diameter in a very hard quartz rock, and this required such heavy pounding that the tourmaline was apt to fall out, leaving round or oblong cavities. A few of these pellets were saved and might be cut into gems. Some opaque tourmaline was found in triangular crystals of about 1/2 x 3”, which were a yellowish green on the outside and greyish white inside. As they were in quartz, it was difficult to get them of much length.

Plenty of the other minerals were found that are so common and plentiful at this mine, but that help brighten up a collection; like lilac colored lepidolite, the combination of deep green manganapatitie and red massive garnet, and spodumene, much of which is changed to green and chocolate-brown pinite, and pink kunzite.


Seaman (1947) provides some additional commentary:

The opening up of the Schoonmaker mine occurred in July, 1933, and some truly fine tourmalines could be collected from the first material thrown out from near the surface. Tourmalines in five colors were easily collected ranging from green through yellow to purple, blue, and black either from one end of a crystal to the other end or perhaps in a series of different colored crystals in parallel position with each other. Much of this material was quickly covered up so I feel that if one could get into the center of this dump some fine tourmalines could still be found.

On November 11, 1934, in company with the editor of this magazine, the locality was visited again. Many excellent minerals were available. Lepidolite was still quite common as well as large, lath shaped, portions of spodumene crystals cutting blue cleavelandite, many crystals coming together at a point in a V-termination. One such specimen had a perfectly terminated spodumene crystal attached to it, about an inch long. A small one-half inch long bicolored pink and green tourmaline crystal with pink interior and outer edge green, like a water¬melon, was picked up from the dump of the Schoonmaker mine. A small perfectly terminated manganapatite crystal with black tourmaline and almandite garnets and yellow beryl as associated minerals was secured.


When closed after WWII, Schooner (1947) gave this description of the site:

As some collectors undoubtedly know, the Collins Hill locality is completely inactive with the Strickland Feldspar Quarry submerged in a veritable sea of bluish-green water and the Schoonmaker Mica Mine looking as though it had been deserted for a decade! All of the buildings are still standing and locked at the latter working, but the vicinity of the Strickland has surrendered everything that could possibly aid in relieving the lumber shortage. The big dump still provides some interesting minerals, but these are naturally of the rarer less colorful, and more readily overlooked species. I have had my best luck in finding the relatively uncommon phosphates of the lithiophilite series of alteration products. In addition to these I have also found several specimens containing crystallized uraninite with an occasional incrustation of reddish-orange gummite.


When the golf course was built in the 1990s the dump was removed and the flooded shaft filled in with rocks and soil. A irrigation pump house now sits over the shaft. Collecting is no longer allowed or possible in any case.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


28 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Actinolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
Albite var: Cleavelandite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Habit: tabular, platy
Colour: white to pale blue
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Almandine
Formula: Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Aragonite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Bertrandite
Formula: Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Description: In cavities in feldspar.
Reference: Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Beryl var: Aquamarine
Formula: Be3Al2Si6O18
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Beryl var: Heliodor
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Colour: yellow
Reference: Harold Moritz collection; Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
Beryl var: Morganite
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Colour: pink
Description: Many fine pieces.
Reference: Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
'Chlorite Group'
Reference: David Busha collection
Cordierite
Formula: (Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Reference: Am Min 35:173-184
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Description: Likely from calc-silicate rock units in the Collins Hill Formation hosting the pegmatite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1955), 90 Minerals from 1 Connecticut Hill. Rocks & Minerals: 30(7-8): 351-8.
Elbaite
Formula: Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Colour: green, pink, yellow, purple, blue
Description: Some of the crystals had a deep pink center and were colorless on the outside, and some were pink at one end and green on the other. Some occurred in an unusual form, as pellets of a quarter inch or more in diameter. Some opaque tourmaline was found in triangular crystals of about 1/2 x 3”, which were a yellowish green on the outside and greyish white inside. (Little, 1942). Tourmalines in five colors were easily collected ranging from green through yellow to purple, blue, and black either from one end of a crystal to the other end or perhaps in a series of different colored crystals in parallel position with each other...A small one-half inch long bicolored pink and green tourmaline crystal with pink interior and outer edge green, like a watermelon, was picked up from the dump of the Schoonmaker mine. (Seaman, 1947)
Reference: Harold Moritz collection; Little (1942); Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Description: "small perfectly terminated manganapatite crystal" (Seaman, 1947)
Reference: Harold Moritz collection; Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Colour: purple
Description: found in two forms; as dark purple cleavage pieces, and as nodules that were covered with a grey film, but that fluoresced a beautiful lavender blue. The cleavage pieces were not fluorescent. With pyrite.
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358; Little (1942)
Grossular
Formula: Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
'Gummite'
Colour: reddish-orange
Description: Associated with crystallized uraninite.
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1947): Collins Hill (Portland, Conn.) Deserted. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 2, p. 135.
'Lepidolite'
Colour: purple
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Lithiophilite
Formula: LiMn2+PO4
Colour: deep orange-red to reddish brown to light brown
Description: with some spodumene and lepidolite; some very fine specimens of deep orange-red color in quartz
Reference: Little, L. W. (1942): Recent Finds of Minerals in Central Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals. vol. 17, pp 280-2.; Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Montebrasite
Formula: LiAl(PO4)(OH)
Habit: typically anhedral
Colour: white or pinkish, with brown rind
Description: called amblygonite, but shown by others to be montebrasite
Reference: Little, L. W. (1942): Recent Finds of Minerals in Central Connecticut. Rocks and Minerals, vol. 17, pp. 280-2.; Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; USGS Prof Paper 255
Pickeringite
Formula: MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
'Pinite'
Colour: yellow, green, gray, lavendar, brown
Description: Alteration of spodumene.
Reference: Am Min 35:173-184; Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Habit: cubic
Colour: brassy yellow
Description: bright cubes of pyrite which varied in size up to 1/2 inch on the faces
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358; Little (1942)
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358; USGS Prof Paper 255
Quartz var: Rock Crystal
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Quartz var: Smoky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Rhodochrosite
Formula: MnCO3
Reference: Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
'Scapolite' ?
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Colour: black
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.; Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Colour: black
Reference: Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 15, no. 6, p. 202.
Spodumene
Formula: LiAlSi2O6
Habit: elongated, flat crystals with dome termination
Colour: tan to lavendar
Description: Much material etched to look like wood or altered to pinite.
Reference: Harold Moritz collection.; Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 732-3.
'Tourmaline'
Formula: A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
'Tourmaline var: Rubellite'
Formula: A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
'Tourmaline var: Verdelite'
Formula: A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 12: 141-143.
Uraninite
Formula: UO2
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1947): Collins Hill (Portland, Conn.) Deserted. Rocks & Minerals, vol. 22, no. 2, p. 135.
Xenotime-(Y) ?
Formula: Y(PO4)
Habit: tabular and prismatic
Colour: brown
Description: "Brown crystals, both tabular and prismatic, are found in close association with little diversely oriented columbite crystals in tan albite. The prismatic crystals resemble zircon...The largest crystal seen was a tabular one, nearly an inch across." Schooner (1958). These sound like potential confusion with wodginite!
Reference: Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Zoisite
Formula: Ca2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
Reference: Rocks & Minerals (1955) 30:351-358

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Rock Crystal4.DA.05SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Uraninite4.DL.05UO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aragonite5.AB.15CaCO3
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Rhodochrosite5.AB.05MnCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Pickeringite7.CB.85MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Lithiophilite8.AB.10LiMn2+PO4
Montebrasite8.BB.05LiAl(PO4)(OH)
Xenotime-(Y) ?8.AD.35Y(PO4)
Group 9 - Silicates
Actinolite9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
var: Cleavelandite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Almandine9.AD.25Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Bertrandite9.BD.05Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Aquamarine9.CJ.05Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Morganite9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Cordierite9.CJ.10(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Elbaite9.CK.05Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Grossular9.AD.25Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Spodumene9.DA.30LiAlSi2O6
Zoisite9.BG.10Ca2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Chlorite Group'-
'Gummite'-
'Lepidolite'-
'Pinite'-
'Scapolite' ?-
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Rubellite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Verdelite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 5 - OXIDES CONTAINING URANIUM OR THORIUM
AXO2·xH2O
Uraninite5.1.1.1UO2
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Rhodochrosite14.1.1.4MnCO3
Group 29 - HYDRATED ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AB2(XO4)4·H2O
Pickeringite29.7.3.1MgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Group 38 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL PHOSPHATES, ARSENATES, AND VANADATES
ABXO4
Lithiophilite38.1.1.2LiMn2+PO4
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Montebrasite41.5.8.2LiAl(PO4)(OH)
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [6] and >[6] coordination
Almandine51.4.3a.2Fe2+3Al2(SiO4)3
Grossular51.4.3b.2Ca3Al2(SiO4)3
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Bertrandite56.1.1.1Be4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Group 58 - SOROSILICATES Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups
Insular, Mixed, Single, and Larger Tetrahedral Groups with cations in [6] and higher coordination; single and double groups (n = 1, 2)
Zoisite58.2.1b.1Ca2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with Al substituted rings
Cordierite61.2.1.1(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Elbaite61.3.1.8Na(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Spodumene65.1.4.1LiAlSi2O6
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Actinolite-☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Albite
var: Cleavelandite
-Na(AlSi3O8)
Aragonite-CaCO3
Beryl
var: Aquamarine
-Be3Al2Si6O18
var: Heliodor-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
var: Morganite-Be3Al2(Si6O18)
'Chlorite Group'-
'Gummite'-
'Lepidolite'-
'Pinite'-
Quartz
var: Rock Crystal
-SiO2
var: Smoky Quartz-SiO2
'Scapolite' ?-
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Rubellite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
'var: Verdelite'-A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Xenotime-(Y) ?-Y(PO4)

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
H ZoisiteCa2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
H MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
H BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
LiLithium
Li ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Li LithiophiliteLiMn2+PO4
Li SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
Li MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
BeBeryllium
Be Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Be Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Be Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
BBoron
B ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
B Tourmaline (var: Verdelite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B Tourmaline (var: Rubellite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
CCarbon
C AragoniteCaCO3
C CalciteCaCO3
C RhodochrositeMnCO3
OOxygen
O ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O LithiophiliteLiMn2+PO4
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O AragoniteCaCO3
O Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
O Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
O AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Quartz (var: Rock Crystal)SiO2
O Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O Tourmaline (var: Verdelite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O Tourmaline (var: Rubellite)A(D3)G6(T6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O Cordierite(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
O Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O CalciteCaCO3
O QuartzSiO2
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
O GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
O ZoisiteCa2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
O SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
O Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
O UraniniteUO2
O BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
O Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
O RhodochrositeMnCO3
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F FluoriteCaF2
NaSodium
Na ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Na Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
MgMagnesium
Mg Cordierite(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Mg Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Mg PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
AlAluminium
Al ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Al Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Al AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al Cordierite(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Al PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
Al GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Al ZoisiteCa2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
Al SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
Al Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
Al Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
SiSilicon
Si ElbaiteNa(Li1.5Al1.5)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si Albite (var: Cleavelandite)Na(AlSi3O8)
Si Beryl (var: Aquamarine)Be3Al2Si6O18
Si AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Quartz (var: Rock Crystal)SiO2
Si Quartz (var: Smoky Quartz)SiO2
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si Cordierite(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Si Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si QuartzSiO2
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Si GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Si ZoisiteCa2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
Si SpodumeneLiAlSi2O6
Si Beryl (var: Heliodor)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si BertranditeBe4(Si2O7)(OH)2
Si Beryl (var: Morganite)Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
PPhosphorus
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
P LithiophiliteLiMn2+PO4
P MontebrasiteLiAl(PO4)(OH)
P Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
S PickeringiteMgAl2(SO4)4 · 22H2O
S SphaleriteZnS
KPotassium
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca AragoniteCaCO3
Ca FluoriteCaF2
Ca Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca GrossularCa3Al2(SiO4)3
Ca ZoisiteCa2Al3[Si2O7][SiO4]O(OH)
MnManganese
Mn LithiophiliteLiMn2+PO4
Mn RhodochrositeMnCO3
FeIron
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe AlmandineFe32+Al2(SiO4)3
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Fe Cordierite(Mg,Fe)2Al3(AlSi5O18)
Fe Actinolite☐{Ca2}{Mg4.5-2.5Fe0.5-2.5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
YYttrium
Y Xenotime-(Y)Y(PO4)
UUranium
U UraniniteUO2

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Zodac, Peter. (1937): Minerals of the Strickland Quarry. Rocks & Minerals: 12: 131-141.
Bartsch, Rudolf C. B. (1940): New England Notes. Rocks & Minerals: 15(6): 202.
Little, L. W. (1942): Recent Finds of Minerals in Central Connecticut. Rocks & Minerals: 17(8): 280-2.
Schooner, Richard. (1947): Collins Hill (Portland, Conn.) Deserted. Rocks & Minerals: 22(2): 135.
Seaman, David W. (1947): Reminiscing On Collins Hill, Portland, Conn. Rocks & Minerals: 22(8): 732-3.
Cameron, Eugene N., David M. Larrabee, Andrew H. McNair, James T. Page, Glenn W. Stewart, and Vincent E. Shainin, (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958): Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Jones, Robert W. (1960): Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Albini, Anthony J. (1979): Selected Pegmatite Quarries Of The Central Connecticut Region. Masters thesis. Central Connecticut State College, New Britain, Connecticut.
Webster, Bud and Bill Shelton. (1979): Mineral Collector’s Field Guide the Northeast.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue): 70(6): 403.

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