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Gotta-Walden Prospect, Portland, Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Gotta-Walden ProspectProspect
Portland- not defined -
Middlesex Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
41° 37' 9'' North , 72° 35' 38'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Cromwell13,750 (2017)5.1km
Portland5,862 (2017)6.5km
Lake Pocotopaug3,436 (2017)7.3km
Middletown46,756 (2017)7.9km
East Hampton2,691 (2017)9.0km


A granite pegmatite prospect, it is not the same pegmatite as the nearby Walden Gem Quarry http://www.mindat.org/loc-6749.html, which was opened in 1962. Ryerson (1972) lists minerals from the Walden Gem Mine. It is on private property and not open to collecting.

According to Cameron et al (1954) and Boos et al (1949), the Gotta-Walden mica-beryl prospect lies in the town of Portland, 2.1 miles N. 42° E. of Gildersleeve village. Part of the property was owned by John Gotta, part by E. O. Walden, both of Portland. John Gotta leased the property for feldspar mining about 1933 and two small opencuts and several shallow pits were made resulting in a small production. A year or two later, his son, Leopold Gotta, produced a small quantity of feldspar from two pits. The property was then idle until July 1942, when the New Haven Trap Rock Co., sublessee, mined about 140 tons of pegmatite that produced 10 tons of scrap mica, 700 pounds of beryl, and 4 to 5 tons of feldspar.

The Gotta-Walden pegmatite is a fine- to coarse-grained mixture of quartz, albite plagioclase, and muscovite, with subordinate microcline perthite and accessory beryl, garnet, tourmaline, apatite, columbite-tantalite(?), pyrite, and fluorite. The minerals are grouped into the following zones from the walls inward:

1. Quartz-plagioclase border zone, ½ to 5 feet thick. Fine-grained to medium-grained quartz and albite plagioclase, with accessory muscovite, garnet, tourmaline and beryl. Much of the zone has an aplitic texture.
2. Muscovite-quartz-plagioclase wall zone, 1 to 5 feet thick. A medium- to coarse-grained mixture of quartz and albite plagioclase with muscovite books 2 to 25 inches in diameter and ½ to 12 inches thick. Many of the mica crystals are elongate parallel to the C-axis. Accessory minerals are beryl, garnet and tourmaline.
3. Plagioclase-quartz-perthite-muscovite zone, 3 to at least 20 feet thick. This seems to be the core of the pegmatite. Albite plagioclase (cleavelandite in part) and quartz are the predominant minerals. Microcline perthite is abundant in places, but commonly is present only as scattered anhedral crystals as much as 39 inches long and 12 inches thick. Muscovite books 2 inches or less in diameter are abundant in places. Beryl, tourmaline, garnet, and columbite-tantalite are minor accessories.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Mineral List


12 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960) LUMINESCENT MINERALS OF CONNECTICUT, A GUIDE TO THEIR PROPERTIES AND LOCATIONS.
Annite
Formula: KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Autunite
Formula: Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960) LUMINESCENT MINERALS OF CONNECTICUT, A GUIDE TO THEIR PROPERTIES AND LOCATIONS.
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Habit: hexagonal elongated prisms
Colour: golden, yellow-green and green
Description: Subhedral to euhedral crystals. Most of the crystals are less than 2 inches long and less than 1 inch in diameter, but a few crystals 6 to 8 inches long and 3 to 5 inches in diameter have been found, and one crystal 16 by 13 inches is exposed. The crystals are commonly glassy and free of intergrown minerals. (Cameron et al 1954)
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
'Columbite-Tantalite'
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Fluorapatite
Formula: Ca5(PO4)3F
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960) LUMINESCENT MINERALS OF CONNECTICUT, A GUIDE TO THEIR PROPERTIES AND LOCATIONS.
Fluorite
Formula: CaF2
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
'Garnet Group'
Formula: X3Z2(SiO4)3
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Microcline
Formula: K(AlSi3O8)
Description: anhedral crystals as much as 39 inches long and 12 inches thick (Cameron et al 1954)
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Colour: gray
Description: Muscovite books 2 to 25 inches in diameter and ½ to 12 inches thick. Many of the mica crystals are elongate parallel to the C-axis. (Cameron et al 1954)
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Opal
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960) LUMINESCENT MINERALS OF CONNECTICUT, A GUIDE TO THEIR PROPERTIES AND LOCATIONS.
Opal var: Opal-AN
Formula: SiO2 · nH2O
Reference: Jones, Robert W. (1960) LUMINESCENT MINERALS OF CONNECTICUT, A GUIDE TO THEIR PROPERTIES AND LOCATIONS.
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.
Schorl
Formula: Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Reference: Kevin Czaja Collection
'Tourmaline'
Formula: A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Reference: Cameron, Eugene N. and others. (1954) PEGMATITE INVESTIGATIONS 1942-45 NEW ENGLAND. U.S. Geological Survey, Professional Paper 255.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Group 3 - Halides
Fluorite3.AB.25CaF2
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Opal4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
var: Opal-AN4.DA.10SiO2 · nH2O
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Autunite8.EB.05Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Fluorapatite8.BN.05Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Annite9.EC.20KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Microcline9.FA.30K(AlSi3O8)
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Schorl9.CK.05Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Columbite-Tantalite'-
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX2
Fluorite9.2.1.1CaF2
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
AB2(XO4)2·xH2O, containing (UO2)2+
Autunite40.2a.1.1Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Fluorapatite41.8.1.1Ca5(PO4)3F
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Six-Membered Rings with borate groups
Schorl61.3.1.10Na(Fe2+3)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Annite71.2.2b.3KFe2+3(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with H2O and organics
Opal75.2.1.1SiO2 · nH2O
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Microcline76.1.1.5K(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Columbite-Tantalite'-
'Garnet Group'-X3Z2(SiO4)3
Opal
var: Opal-AN
-SiO2 · nH2O
'Tourmaline'-A(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
H Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
H AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H OpalSiO2 · nH2O
H SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
BeBeryllium
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
BBoron
B TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
B SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
OOxygen
O AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
O Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
O FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
O AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
O OpalSiO2 · nH2O
O SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O QuartzSiO2
O MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
FFluorine
F FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
F FluoriteCaF2
NaSodium
Na SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
AlAluminium
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
SiSilicon
Si Opal (var: Opal-AN)SiO2 · nH2O
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si TourmalineA(D3)G6(Si6O18)(BO3)3X3Z
Si AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Garnet GroupX3Z2(SiO4)3
Si OpalSiO2 · nH2O
Si SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si QuartzSiO2
Si MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
PPhosphorus
P AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
P FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
KPotassium
K AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K MicroclineK(AlSi3O8)
CaCalcium
Ca AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O
Ca FluorapatiteCa5(PO4)3F
Ca FluoriteCaF2
FeIron
Fe AnniteKFe32+(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe SchorlNa(Fe32+)Al6(Si6O18)(BO3)3(OH)3(OH)
UUranium
U AutuniteCa(UO2)2(PO4)2 · 11H2O

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Devonian - Silurian
358.9 - 443.8 Ma



ID: 3186140
Paleozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks

Age: Paleozoic (358.9 - 443.8 Ma)

Lithology: Mudstone-carbonate-sandstone-conglomerate

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Late Ordovician - Middle Ordovician
443.8 - 470 Ma



ID: 2978277
Collins Hill Formation

Age: Ordovician (443.8 - 470 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Collins Hill Formation

Description: ( = Partridge Formation of New Hampshire) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, and commonly staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite, generally graphitic, interlayered with fine-grained two-mica gneiss, especially to the west, and with calc-silicate and amphibolite layers, also rare quartz-spessartine (coticule) layers.

Comments: Part of Eastern Uplands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Bronson Hill Anticlinorium; Brimfield Schist and equivalent formations (includes Collins Hill Formation) (Upper? and Middle Ordovician). Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{schist}, Minor:{gneiss}, Incidental:{amphibolite, calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Boos, M. F., E. E. Maillot and McHenry Mosier. (1949): Investigation of Portland Beryl-Mica District, Middlesex County, Conn. U. S. Bureau of Mines Report of Investigation 4425.
Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958): Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Jones, Robert W. (1960): Luminescent Minerals of Connecticut, a Guide to Their Properties and Locations.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Ryerson, Kathleen, H. (1972): Rock Hound’s Guide to Connecticut. Pequot press.

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