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East Hampton (Chatham), Middlesex Co., Connecticut, USA

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 34' 31'' North , 72° 30' 8'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.57528,-72.50222
Köppen climate type:Dfa : Hot-summer humid continental climate


European settlers arrived in 1739 from Eastham, Massachusetts. In 1746, they named their community Easthampton parish after their former home of Eastham. In 1767, the community was separated from Middletown and incorporated by the Connecticut General Assembly as the township of Chatham, after Chatham, Medway due to the important shipbuilding industries that both places had in common. The town name was officially changed to East Hampton in 1915.

East Hampton lies within the eastern-central part of the Middletown Pegmatite District and so contains hundreds of pegmatites and many prospects and quarries. Straddling the Bronson Hill island arc terrane and the Central Maine oceanic terrane, the geology consists of mostly metamorphic rocks - gneiss, schist, calc-silicate gneiss, and quartzite of volcanic, plutonic, and sedimentary origin. As a result, the topography is very rugged and parts of the town are heavily forested. The quartzite underlies Great Hill, near the village of Cobalt, where cobalt and nickel were mined along Mine Brook, and microscopic gold occurs in arsenopyrite veins.

Coordinates are for the center of town on state Route 196.

Mindat Articles

(Revisised) Minerals and localities of East Hampton Connecticut by Rowan Lytle


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Actinolite

Albite

var: Cleavelandite

var: Oligoclase

'Albite-Anorthite Series'

Allanite-(Ce)

Almandine

'Almandine-Spessartine Series'

Annabergite

Annite

Anorthite

Arsenopyrite

var: Danaite

Augite

Autunite

Bastnäsite-(Ce)

Bavenite

Bertrandite

Beryl

var: Aquamarine

var: Heliodor

var: Morganite

Beyerite ?

'Biotite'

Bismite

Bismuthinite

Bismutite

Cassiterite

Cerite-(Ce) ?

Chalcopyrite

'Chlorite Group'

Columbite-(Fe)

'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'

'Copiapite Group'

Covellite

Cummingtonite

Diadochite

Dravite

Elbaite

Erythrite

'Feldspar Group'

'var: Perthite'

Ferrisicklerite

Fluorapatite

var: Mn-bearing Fluorapatite

Fluorite

var: Chlorophane

Gahnite

Galena

'Garnet'

Gersdorffite

Goethite

Gold

Graphite

Grayite

Grossular

Gypsum

Hematite

Heterosite

'Hornblende'

Hydrokenoelsmoreite ?

var: Ferritungstite ?

Hydroxylapatite

Hydroxylherderite

Ixiolite

var: Wolframoixiolite

Kaolinite

'K Feldspar'

'var: Adularia'

Kyanite

'Labradorite'

Laueite

'Lepidolite'

'Limonite'

Löllingite

Ludlamite

Magnesio-hornblende

Malachite

Marcasite

Melanterite

Messelite

Meta-autunite

Metatorbernite

Microcline

Microlite Group

var: Uranmicrolite (of Hogarth 1977)

Mitridatite

'Monazite'

Monazite-(Ce)

Muscovite

var: Sericite

Opal

var: Opal-AN

Phosphophyllite

Pickeringite

Powellite ?

Pyrite

Pyrrhotite

Quartz

var: Ferruginous Quartz

var: Rose Quartz

var: Smoky Quartz

Rutile

var: Strüverite

'Scapolite'

Scheelite

Schorl

Scorodite

Siderite

Sillimanite

Spessartine

Sphalerite

Staurolite

Strunzite

Sulphur

Tantalite-(Mn)

Tanteuxenite-(Y)

Tapiolite-(Fe)

Titanite

Torbernite

'Tourmalinated Quartz'

'Tourmaline'

Triphylite

Triplite

Uraninite

Uranophane

Vivianite

Whitmoreite

Zircon

var: Cyrtolite


93 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Ordovician - Cambrian
443.8 - 541 Ma



ID: 2851357
Brimfield Schist (Includes Hamilton Resevoir Formation)

Age: Paleozoic (443.8 - 541 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: Brimfield Schist; Hamilton Resevoir Formation

Description: Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, interlayered schist and gneiss, composed of oligoclase, quartz, K-feldspar, and biotite, and commonly garnet, sillimanite, graphite, and pyrrhotite. K-feldspar partly as augen 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers and lenses of hornblende- and pyroxene-bearing gneiss, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.

Comments: Part of Eastern Uplands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Merrimack Synclinorium; Brimfield Schist and equivalent formations (includes Tatnic Hill Formation) (Upper? and Middle Ordovician). The age of the Brimfield Group in this area is Cambrian(?) based on the intrusion of 440 my Hedgehog Hill gneiss in the top of the Hamilton Reservoir Formation in the upper part of the Brimfield, although the top of the Brimfield may be Ordovician or older Paleozoic (Pease, 1989) per CT013.

Lithology: Major:{schist,gneiss}, Minor:{amphibolite,calc silicate rock}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


Localities in this Region


This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Sort by Year (asc) | by Year (desc) | by Author (A-Z) | by Author (Z-A)
Cameron, Eugene N., Larrabee David M., McNair, Andrew H., Page, James T., Stewart, Glenn W., and Shainin, Vincent E. (1954): Pegmatite Investigations 1942-45 New England; USGS Professional Paper 255.
Schooner, Richard. (1958): The Mineralogy of the Portland-East Hampton-Middletown-Haddam Area in Connecticut (With a few notes on Glastonbury and Marlborough). Published by Richard Schooner; Ralph Lieser of Pappy’s Beryl Shop, East Hampton; and Howard Pate of Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Stugard, Frederick, Jr. (1958): Pegmatites of the Middletown Area, Connecticut. USGS Bulletin 1042-Q.
Schooner, Richard. (1961): The Mineralogy of Connecticut. Fluorescent House, Branford, Connecticut.
Weber, Marcelle H. and Earle C. Sullivan. (1995): Connecticut Mineral Locality Index. Rocks & Minerals (Connecticut Issue), Vol. 70, No. 6, p. 403.

Mineral and/or Locality  
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