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Wheal Fortune (Wheal Newton and Queen; South Harrowbarrow Mine; incl. Wheal Newton (Wheal Barnard); Wheal Queen), Harrowbarrow Mine (Harrowbeer Mine; Wheal Goodluck; East Wheal Brothers), Harrowbarrow & Prince of Wales Mines (Calstock United Tin and Copper Mines), Calstock, Cornwall, England, UKi
Regional Level Types
Wheal Fortune (Wheal Newton and Queen; South Harrowbarrow Mine; incl. Wheal Newton (Wheal Barnard); Wheal Queen)Mine (Abandoned)
Harrowbarrow Mine (Harrowbeer Mine; Wheal Goodluck; East Wheal Brothers)Mine (Abandoned)
Harrowbarrow & Prince of Wales Mines (Calstock United Tin and Copper Mines)Group of Mines (Abandoned)
CalstockCivil Parish
CornwallCounty
EnglandConstituent Country
UKCountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
50° 30' 26'' North , 4° 15' 32'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Mine (Abandoned) - last checked 2019
Köppen climate type:
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Gunnislake4,044 (2017)3.7km
Callington5,786 (2017)3.9km
Calstock790 (2017)3.9km
Bere Alston2,164 (2018)5.6km
Lamerton859 (2018)8.7km


An old copper and silver mine, which was already working in the early 18th century. At some time before 1783, its eastern section, known as Wheal Newton, was amalgamated with Wheal George, another old mine to the north, under the name Harrowbarrow Mine. Eventually, the remaining western section, known as Wheal Queen, was also included in the new sett. After the Calstock United Tin and Copper Mines had been dissolved in the late 1850s, both Wheal Fortune sections continued working in various amalgamations until 1873, either with Harrowbarrow Mine or under the title South Harrowbarrow Mine, which was essentially the old Wheal Fortune, but at times may also have included West Wheal Edward or Wheal Sisters. From 1873 until 1880 and again in the late 1890s, Wheal Newton (alternatively known during this time as Wheal Barnard) was worked independently, and around 1890, it worked together with Wheal Queen under the name Wheal Newton and Queen. A record for Wheal Fortune in 1882 may also refer to this mine, but could as well be related to the former Wheal Sisters, which had been renamed Wheal Fortune before its inclusion in the Harrowbarrow sett.

The old Wheal Fortune worked on three EW-trending lodes, from north to south Silver Lode, Well Lode and Harrowbarrow Lode. Silver Lode was worked in Wheal Queen section. It is not proved in the eastern part of the sett, but continues westwards into Wheal Brothers and possibly even further into Silver Valley Mine. It was opened up from Queen Shaft and Western Shaft to a depth of 42 fms and for 60 fms along strike, but most stoping was done above and slightly below the 28 fm level. At shallow levels, the lode yielded much native silver which gave way to silver sulfides at depth, but below 30 fms the silver disappeared. Silver ores were also raised from Well Lode, in Wheal Newton section, and this lode is probably also the source of the famous stephanite crystal (4 inches long and 2.5 inches wide, locality given as Wheal Newton) which is kept in the collection of the British Museum.

Although it was developed to a depth of 60 fms (40 fms below adit) and 160 fms along strike, only a small amount of stoping was done in Well Lode. Workings in Wheal Newton section were focussed on Harrowbarrow Lode instead, which dips towards Well Lode and joins it at 64 fms below surface. The two lodes were opened up from the same shafts, Cook's Shaft in the east and Engine Shaft in the west, the latter sunk between the outcrops and intersecting with the lodes at their junction. In addition, there are three shafts on the backs of the lodes that do not extend below adit level and appear to have been abandoned very early. Harrowbarrow Lode was developed to a depth of 50 fms below adit and 200 fms along strike, and most of the ground above the 30 fm level has been stoped away. It carried a little cassiterite and much pyrite, but was not very productive overall.

The records of output are incomplete. More or less comprehensive figures do only exist for the time after the Calstock United Mines had been dissolved. Earlier records are sporadic and cannot be attributed to a specific mine. South Harrowbarrow Mine returned 1,546 tons of pyrite in 1860 and 27 tons of manganese ore in 1873-1874. For Wheal Newton and Wheal Barnard, 6,753 tons of arsenical pyrite, 2 tons of arsenic and 242 tons of silver ore containing about 27,000 ounces of silver are recorded for 1873-1880 and 1897, and another 4 tons of silver ore for 1880-1882. In addition, Wheal Queen raised 5 tons of 72.5% lead ore in 1870 and 5 tons of silver ore worth £421 in 1871. As already mentioned above, another record for 700 tons of pyrite and 95 ounces of silver returned by Wheal Fortune in 1882 does possibly not refer to this mine.


Notes:
(1) There was another Wheal Fortune (the former Wheal Sisters) just west of the old Wheal Fortune section, which was incorporated into Harrowbarrow Mine after 1833. The two workings should not be confused.
(2) The grid reference is centered on the area.

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


10 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644; Embrey, P.G., and Symes, R.F. (1987): Minerals of Cornwall and Devon. British Museum of Natural History (London), 154 pp.
Arsenopyrite ?
Formula: FeAsS
Description: Wheal Newton raised much "arsenical pyrite" (possibly arsenopyrite) after 1873.
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Cassiterite
Formula: SnO2
Reference: Reid, C., Barrow, G., Sherlock, R.L., MacAlister, D.A., and Dewey, H. (1911): The Geology of the Country around Tavistock and Launceston. HMSO Publications (London), 146 pp.
Galena
Formula: PbS
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1994): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, reprint, HMSO Publications (London), p. xxiii
'Manganese Oxides'
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Pyrargyrite
Formula: Ag3SbS3
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Reference: Reid, C., Barrow, G., Sherlock, R.L., MacAlister, D.A., and Dewey, H. (1911): The Geology of the Country around Tavistock and Launceston. HMSO Publications (London), 146 pp.; Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Reference: Lewis, W.J. (1882): Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 4, 240-244
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Reference: Lewis, W.J. (1882): Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 4, 240-244; Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Silver
Formula: Ag
Reference: Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644
Stephanite
Formula: Ag5SbS4
Reference: Lewis, W.J. (1882): Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 4, 240-244; Dines, H.G. (1956): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644; Golley, P., and Williams, R. (1995): Cornish Mineral Reference Manual. Endsleigh Publications (Truro), 105 pp.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Acanthite2.BA.35Ag2S
Arsenopyrite ?2.EB.20FeAsS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Pyrargyrite2.GA.05Ag3SbS3
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Stephanite2.GB.10Ag5SbS4
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Cassiterite4.DB.05SnO2
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Manganese Oxides'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite ?2.12.4.1FeAsS
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
ø = 4
Stephanite3.2.4.1Ag5SbS4
ø = 3
Pyrargyrite3.4.1.2Ag3SbS3
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
AX2
Cassiterite4.4.1.5SnO2
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Manganese Oxides'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

CCarbon
C SideriteFeCO3
OOxygen
O SideriteFeCO3
O QuartzSiO2
O CassiteriteSnO2
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
SSulfur
S PyriteFeS2
S GalenaPbS
S PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
S StephaniteAg5SbS4
S AcanthiteAg2S
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
FeIron
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe SideriteFeCO3
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
AsArsenic
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS
AgSilver
Ag PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
Ag StephaniteAg5SbS4
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag SilverAg
SnTin
Sn CassiteriteSnO2
SbAntimony
Sb PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
Sb StephaniteAg5SbS4
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS

Geochronology

Geologic TimeRocks, Minerals and Events
Phanerozoic
 Paleozoic
  Permian
   Guadalupian
ⓘ Major polymetallic mineralization~270 MaCornwall, England, UK
   Cisuralian
ⓘ Porphyry dikes intruded (latest age)~275 MaCornwall, England, UK
ⓘ Greisenization (latest age)~280 MaCornwall, England, UK
ⓘ Porphyry dikes intruded (earliest age)~280 MaCornwall, England, UK
ⓘ Formation of metallized pegmatites~285 MaCornwall, England, UK
ⓘ Greisenization (earliest age)~285 MaCornwall, England, UK
ⓘ Emplacement of major plutons~295 MaCornwall, England, UK

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Lewis, W.J. (1882): On a crystal of stephanite from Wheal Newton. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 4, 240-244.
Reid, C., Barrow, G., Sherlock, R.L., MacAlister, D.A., and Dewey, H. (1911): The Geology of the Country around Tavistock and Launceston. HMSO Publications (London), 146 pp.
Dewey, H. (1921): Special Reports on the Mineral Resources of Great Britain, Vol. 21: Lead, Silver-Lead and Zinc Ores of Cornwall, Devon and Somerset. HMSO Publications (London), pp. 49-50.
Jones, W.R. (1925): Tinfields of the World. Mining Publications Ltd. (London), 423 pp.
Barton, D.B. (1964): A historical survey of the mines and mineral railways of East Cornwall and West Devon. D. Bradford Barton Ltd. (Truro), 102 pp.
Hamilton Jenkin, A. K. (1969): Mines and Miners of Cornwall, Vol. 15: Calstock, Callington and Launceston. Federation of Old Cornwall Societies (Penzance), 68 pp.
Dines, H.G. (1994): The Metalliferous Mining Region of South-West England, Vol. 2, reprint, HMSO Publications (London), pp. 641-644, xxiii.

Other Regions, Features and Areas containing this locality

British IslesGroup of Islands
Eurasian PlateTectonic Plate
EuropeContinent
UK

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