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Bagby-Mariposa-Mount Bullion-Whitlock Mining District, Mother Lode Belt, Mariposa Co., California, USAi
Regional Level Types
Bagby-Mariposa-Mount Bullion-Whitlock Mining DistrictMining District
Mother Lode BeltBelt
Mariposa Co.County
CaliforniaState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
37° North , 119° West (est.)
Estimate based on other nearby localities or region boundaries.
Margin of Error:
~21km
Locality type:


A Au-Ag-Cu-Pb-Sb-Ni-Co-As-gemstone mining area located near the southern end of the Motherlode Belt.

This district is comprised of several former smaller districts:

Bagby District:

Location: This district is in western Mariposa County in the vicinity of the towns of Bagby and Bear Valley. It is in the Mother Lode gold belt. History. The streams were placer-mined early in the gold rush, and the Pine Tree and Josephine veins were discovered in 1849. Part of the area was on the Las Mariposa Spanish land grant of General John C. Fremont. Bagby was first known as Benton Mills, named by Fremont for Senator Thomas Hart Benton, his father-in-law. It was renamed in the 1890s for A. Bagby, a hotel owner. The town was a stop on the Yosemite Valley Railroad, which once extended up the Merced River canyon to Yosemite National Park. Gold mining activitv' continued until around 1875. There was mining in the district again in the early 1900s. The Pine Tree-Josephine mine was worked on a major scale from 1933 to 1944, and the Red Bank mine has been active in recent years. Part of the area, including the old town of Bagby, was inundated by the Exchequer Reservoir in 1967.

Geology: In this district the Another Lode gold belt is .about 1 Yi miles wide. It is underlain by northwest-striking beds of slate, phyllite, and metasandstone of the Mariposa Formation (Upper Jurassic), with greenstone and green schist both to the west and southeast (see fig. 18, page 95). A belt of serpentine extends northwest through the central portion of the district and is structurally important in relation to some of the gold-bearing veins. Ore deposits. There are several northwest-trending vein systems that consist of quartz veins and stringers with brecciated slate, schist, and associated bodies of pritic ankerite and mariposite-quartz rock. These vein systems are often scores of feet in thickness. The ore contains free gold, pyrite, and arsenopyrite with small amounts of chalcopyrite, galena, millerite, sphalerite, and niccolite. Milling ore averaged 1/7 to 1/2 ounce of gold per ton. In places high-grade ore is abundant. The ore shoots had stoping lengths of up to 600 feet, and the veins were mined to an inclined depth of 1500 feet.

Mines: Dolman, French ($116,000), Jumper, Juniper, Live Oak, Mexican I ($50,000), Oso ($50,000), Pine Tree-Josephine ($4 million), Queen Specimen, Red Bank ($100,000), Specimen.

Mariposa District:

History: This district is in the vicinity of the town of Mariposa at the southeast end of the Mother Lode gold belt. The Mariposa mine was reported to have been discovered in 1849 by Kit Carson, and the first stamp mill in California was installed there that same year. Much of this district was part of the Las Mariposas Grant of General John C. Fremont. The old courthouse in Mariposa erected in 1854 is the oldest continuously used courthouse in California. The mines were worked until the early 1900s and again during the 1930s. The Mariposa mine has been prospected in recent years.

Geology and Ore Deposits: The district is underlain by northwest-trending belts of slate of the Mariposa Formation (Upper Jurassic), serpentine, and greenstone. There are several massive quartz veins in slate or greenstone. The ore contains free gold, pyrite, and arsenopyrite, which often is associated with highgrade ore. The Mariposa mine has been developed to an inclined depth of 1500 feet.

Mines: Evans II, Kane, Mariposa ($2,395,000),
Stockton Creek, Stockton Creek Tunnel.

Mount Bullion District:

Located in westcentral Mariposa County about seven miles northwest of Mariposa. The district is in the southern end of the Mother Lode gold belt and extends northwest towards Bagby and Bear Valley (fig. 18). It includes the Agua Fria and Mount Ophir areas.

History: This region was first placer-mined in 1848, many of the miners having been of Spanish descent. Agua Fria Creek and other streams were highly productive (Agua fria means cold water in Spanish). Lode gold-mining began shortly afterward. Much of this district is in the Las Mariposa land grant, which originally belonged to General John C. Fremont. The mines in this grant were not located and surveyed in the same fashion as those on public lands, and to this day the land plats within this grant are difficult to coordinate with established survey lines. The grant later underwent lengthy litigation, and Fremont eventually went bankrupt. He named nearby Mount Bullion for his father-in-law. Senator Thomas Hart Benton, who was sometimes known as "Old Bullion." At Mount Ophir, which is now a ghost town, are the ruins of an early-day mint. From 1849 until 1854 private coinage subject to federal inspection was authorized in California. It is believed that some of the now extremely rare and valuable octagonal fifty-dollar gold slugs were minted here from locally mined gold. Gold mining in the district continued fairly steadily from the 1850s through the 1870s. There was considerable activity from around 1900 to 1920 when the Princeton and other mines were worked. Some mining was done in the 1930s and early 1940s, and there have been a few intermittent small-scale operations since.

Geology: As shown in figure 18, the gold mineralization is confined chiefly to a northwest-trending belt of slate, phyllite, and metasandstone of the Mariposa Formation (Upper Jurassic). Within this formation are two belts of pyrite-bearing metarhyolite that may have possible future economic significance. Greenstone of the Pefion Blanco Formation (Upper Jurassic) crops out to the east and west. Also present are thin bands of serpentine and numerous aplite dikes.

Ore Deposits: Several north-northwest-striking systems of quartz veins occur principally in slate. The veins usually range from four to 10 feet in thickness, although there are some massive ones that are considerably thicker. The ore contains free gold and pyrite, which is abundant in places. Millng ore yielded from ¼ to ½ ounce of gold per ton, and considerable highgrade ore was recovered close to the surface. Some of the ore shoots were extensive; several in the Princeton mine had stoping lengths of more than 500 feet. The greatest depth of development is 1,600 feet on the incline. A number of extensive vein systems have not been thoroughly explored. Also, there are several extensive 1970 deposits of pyritic metarhyolite in the Mariposa Formation that in places contain gold. These bodies are several miles long and 60 or more feet thick.

Mines: Greens Gulch ($119,000+), King Midas, Louis, Mt. Ophir ($250,000 to $300,000), Mountain View I, Nellie Kahoe, Ortega, Princeton 1 $ 5 million), Sorrel.

Whitlock District:

Location: The Whitlock district is in west-central Mariposa County five miles north of the town of Mariposa. The district is east of the Mother Lode gold belt and includes the Colorado, Sherlock Creek, and Whiskey Flat areas. The area was placer-mined soon after the beginning of the gold rush, and lode mining began shortly afterward. A number of mines were active here during the 1930s, and a few, such as the Diltz and Schroeder mines, have been intermittently prospected in recent years.

Geology: Greenstone and green schist underlie much of the district, with some slate, phyllite, and mica schist in the north portion. Granitic intrusives and serpentine are to the south. There is an appreciable number of diorite, quartz-diorite, and aplite dikes that commonly are associated with the gold-quartz veins. A northwest-trending fault extends along the west side of the district (see fig. 18).

Ore Deposits: Numerous north- and northweststriking quartz veins contain small but rich ore shoots. The veins usually are one to five feet thick, and a number dip at low angles. The veins have a tendency to roll or bend, and it is in these bends or rolls that the high-grade pockets often occur. Much specimen ore has been produced in the district; in 1932 the Diltz mine yielded 52- and 40-pound masses of gold and quartz. The greatest depth of development is about 900 feet.

Mines: Buffalo, Champion, Colorado ($50,000), Diltz ($750,000 to $1 million), Geary, Golden Key ($154,000), King Solomon, Landrum, Nutmeg ($180,000+), Our Chance, Permit, Schroeder ($200,000 to $300,000), Spread Eagle ($425,000), and the Whitlock ($500,000).

Regions containing this locality

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North America PlateTectonic Plate

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Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded from this region.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

33 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

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Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Albite
Formula: Na(AlSi3O8)
Andalusite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Andalusite var: Chiastolite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Ankerite
Formula: Ca(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Localities:
Arsenopyrite
Formula: FeAsS
Localities: Reported from at least 6 localities in this region.
Arsenopyrite var: Danaite
Formula: (Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10031010.
'Asbestos'
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10285634.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Localities:
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Localities: Reported from at least 7 localities in this region.
Chlorargyrite
Formula: AgCl
Reference: Julihn, C.E. and F.W. Horton (1940), Mines of the Southern Mother Lode Region, Part II - Tuolumne and Mariposa Counties; in: Mineral Industried Survey of the United States, California. U.S. Bureau of Mines, Bulletin 424: 164; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 195.
'Chlorite Group'
'Clays'
Reference: Rocks & Minerals 83:5 pp 392-401
Copper
Formula: Cu
Description: Native copper occurs in carbonate (unspecified) ore.
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10031259.
Covellite
Formula: CuS
Description: Described as "blue sulfide" occurring in the lower portion of the vein.
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10031259.
Erythrite
Formula: Co3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Reference: Turner, Henry Ward (1896), Further contributions to the geology of the Sierra Nevada: USGS, 17th. Annual Report, part 1: 679; Logan, Clarence August (1934), Mother Lode Gold Belt of California: California Division Mines Bulletin 108, 221 pp.: 189; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 76, 321; Rocks & Minerals 82 (2007): 402-407.
'Ferro-Actinolite-Tremolite Series'
Freibergite
Formula: (Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe2+2Sb4S12
Reference: Hanks, Henry Garber (1884), Fourth report of the State Mineralogist: California Mining Bureau. Report 4, 410 pp.: 388; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 363.
Galena
Formula: PbS
Localities: Reported from at least 12 localities in this region.
Galena var: Argentiferous Galena
Formula: PbS
Description: Locally prominent.
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10031155.
'Garnierite'
Reference: Bradley, W.W. (1941), Thirty-seventh report of the State Mineralogist: California Division Mines Report 37: 491; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 197, 198; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 65.
Gersdorffite
Formula: NiAsS
Reference: Bradley, W.W. (1941), Thirty-seventh report of the State Mineralogist: California Division Mines Report 37: 491; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 197, 198; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 65, 422.
Gold
Formula: Au
Localities: Reported from at least 149 localities in this region.
'Gold Amalgam'
Reference: Schmitz (1852), Goldamalgam in Californien, letter to V. Gerolt: Deut. Geol. Ges., Zeitschr. 4: 713; Sonnenschein, F. (1854), Ueber das Vorkommen der natürlichen Goldamalgams in Californien: Deutsche geol. Gesell., Zeitschr., Band 6: 244; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 205
Graphite
Formula: C
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10031114.
'Limonite'
Formula: (Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Reference: Cook, Lees, Francis (2009) The Colorado Quartz Gold Mine Mariposa County, California. Rocks & Minerals 84:396-412
Magnetite
Formula: Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10036155.
'Mariposite'
Formula: K(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
Millerite
Formula: NiS
Description: Occurs in ores.
Reference: Bowen, O.E., Jr. & C.H. Gray, Jr. (1957), Mines and mineral deposits of Mariposa County, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology: 53(1&2): 154; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 64.
Muscovite
Formula: KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Muscovite var: Phengite
Formula: KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
'Native Amalgam'
Formula: (Ag,Hg)
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Népouite
Formula: (Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Reference: Bradley, W.W. (1941), Thirty-seventh report of the State Mineralogist: California Division Mines Report 37: 491; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 422.
Nickeline
Formula: NiAs
Reference: Bowen, O.E., Jr. & C.H. Gray, Jr. (1957), Mines and mineral deposits of Mariposa County, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology: 53(1&2): 154; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 66.
Platinum
Formula: Pt
Description: Placer material.
Reference: USGS (2005), Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, loc. file ID #10236802.
Proustite
Formula: Ag3AsS3
Pyrargyrite
Formula: Ag3SbS3
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Localities: Reported from at least 21 localities in this region.
Pyrrhotite
Formula: Fe7S8
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Localities: Reported from at least 112 localities in this region.
Quartz var: Milky Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Localities:
'Serpentine Subgroup'
Formula: D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Sillimanite
Formula: Al2(SiO4)O
Habit: Prismatic
Colour: Silvery
Description: Occurs as minute silvery prisms in schists.
Reference: Turner, Henry Ward (1896), Further contributions to the geology of the Sierra Nevada: USGS, 17th. Annual Report, part 1: 690; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 338.
Silver
Formula: Ag
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Talc
Formula: Mg3Si4O10(OH)2
Localities: Reported from at least 9 localities in this region.
Tellurium
Formula: Te
Reference: Silliman, Benjamin, Jr. (1868a), Note on three new localities of tellurium minerals in California and on some mineralogical features of the mother vein: California Academy of Natural Sciences Proceedings: 3: 380; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 360; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 51.
Tetrahedrite
Formula: Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
'Wad'

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Gold1.AA.05Au
Graphite1.CB.05aC
Platinum1.AF.10Pt
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Tellurium1.CC.10Te
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Acanthite2.BA.35Ag2S
Arsenopyrite2.EB.20FeAsS
var: Danaite2.EB.20(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Covellite2.CA.05aCuS
Freibergite2.GB.05(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe2+2Sb4S12
Galena2.CD.10PbS
var: Argentiferous Galena2.CD.10PbS
Gersdorffite2.EB.25NiAsS
Millerite2.CC.20NiS
Nickeline2.CC.05NiAs
Proustite2.GA.05Ag3AsS3
Pyrargyrite2.GA.05Ag3SbS3
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Pyrrhotite2.CC.10Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Tetrahedrite2.GB.05Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Group 3 - Halides
Chlorargyrite3.AA.15AgCl
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Magnetite4.BB.05Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
var: Milky Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Ankerite5.AB.10Ca(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Erythrite8.CE.40Co3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Albite9.FA.35Na(AlSi3O8)
Andalusite9.AF.10Al2(SiO4)O
var: Chiastolite9.AF.10Al2(SiO4)O
Muscovite9.EC.15KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
var: Phengite9.EC.15KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
Népouite9.ED.15(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Sillimanite9.AF.05Al2(SiO4)O
Talc9.EC.05Mg3Si4O10(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Asbestos'-
'Chlorite Group'-
'Clays'-
'Ferro-Actinolite-Tremolite Series'-
'Garnierite'-
'Gold Amalgam'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
'Mariposite'-K(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
'Native Amalgam'-(Ag,Hg)
'Serpentine Subgroup'-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
'Wad'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Gold1.1.1.1Au
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Platinum Group Metals and Alloys
Platinum1.2.1.1Pt
Semi-metals and non-metals
Graphite1.3.6.2C
Tellurium1.3.4.2Te
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Covellite2.8.12.1CuS
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Millerite2.8.16.1NiS
Nickeline2.8.11.1NiAs
Pyrrhotite2.8.10.1Fe7S8
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite2.12.4.1FeAsS
Gersdorffite2.12.3.2NiAsS
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
3 <ø < 4
Freibergite3.3.6.3(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe2+2Sb4S12
Tetrahedrite3.3.6.1Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
ø = 3
Proustite3.4.1.1Ag3AsS3
Pyrargyrite3.4.1.2Ag3SbS3
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Magnetite7.2.2.3Fe2+Fe3+2O4
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX
Chlorargyrite9.1.4.1AgCl
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
AB(XO3)2
Ankerite14.2.1.2Ca(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Group 40 - HYDRATED NORMAL PHOSPHATES,ARSENATES AND VANADATES
A3(XO4)2·xH2O
Erythrite40.3.6.3Co3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Group 52 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups and O,OH,F,H2O
Insular SiO4 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] and >[4] coordination
Andalusite52.2.2b.1Al2(SiO4)O
Sillimanite52.2.2a.1Al2(SiO4)O
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 1:1 layers
Népouite71.1.2b.3(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 2:1 layers
Muscovite71.2.2a.1KAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Talc71.2.1.3Mg3Si4O10(OH)2
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Group 76 - TECTOSILICATES Al-Si Framework
Al-Si Framework with Al-Si frameworks
Albite76.1.3.1Na(AlSi3O8)
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
Andalusite
var: Chiastolite
-Al2(SiO4)O
Arsenopyrite
var: Danaite
-(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
'Asbestos'-
'Chlorite Group'-
'Clays'-
'Ferro-Actinolite-Tremolite Series'-
Galena
var: Argentiferous Galena
-PbS
'Garnierite'-
'Gold Amalgam'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
'Mariposite'-K(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
Muscovite
var: Phengite
-KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
'Native Amalgam'-(Ag,Hg)
Quartz
var: Milky Quartz
-SiO2
'Serpentine Subgroup'-D3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
'Wad'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H TalcMg3Si4O10(OH)2
H ErythriteCo3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
H MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
H Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
H Népouite(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
H Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
H MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
H Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
CCarbon
C AnkeriteCa(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
C CalciteCaCO3
C GraphiteC
OOxygen
O QuartzSiO2
O TalcMg3Si4O10(OH)2
O AnkeriteCa(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
O Andalusite (var: Chiastolite)Al2(SiO4)O
O CalciteCaCO3
O MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
O ErythriteCo3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
O SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
O MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
O Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
O Népouite(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
O AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
O Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
O Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
O AndalusiteAl2(SiO4)O
O MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
O Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
NaSodium
Na AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
MgMagnesium
Mg TalcMg3Si4O10(OH)2
Mg AnkeriteCa(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Mg Népouite(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Mg Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Mg Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
AlAluminium
Al Andalusite (var: Chiastolite)Al2(SiO4)O
Al SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Al MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
Al AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Al Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Al AndalusiteAl2(SiO4)O
Al MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Al Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
SiSilicon
Si QuartzSiO2
Si TalcMg3Si4O10(OH)2
Si Andalusite (var: Chiastolite)Al2(SiO4)O
Si SillimaniteAl2(SiO4)O
Si MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
Si Népouite(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Si AlbiteNa(AlSi3O8)
Si Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Si Quartz (var: Milky Quartz)SiO2
Si AndalusiteAl2(SiO4)O
Si MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
Si Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
SSulfur
S TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
S PyriteFeS2
S GalenaPbS
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S SphaleriteZnS
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
S PyrrhotiteFe7S8
S GersdorffiteNiAsS
S Freibergite(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe22+Sb4S12
S MilleriteNiS
S AcanthiteAg2S
S PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
S ProustiteAg3AsS3
S Arsenopyrite (var: Danaite)(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
S Galena (var: Argentiferous Galena)PbS
S CovelliteCuS
ClChlorine
Cl ChlorargyriteAgCl
KPotassium
K MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
K MuscoviteKAl2(AlSi3O10)(OH)2
K Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
CaCalcium
Ca AnkeriteCa(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
CrChromium
Cr MaripositeK(Al,Cr)2(Al,Si)4O10(OH)2
MnManganese
Mn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
FeIron
Fe TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe AnkeriteCa(Fe2+,Mg)(CO3)2
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe MagnetiteFe2+Fe23+O4
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
Fe PyrrhotiteFe7S8
Fe Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Fe Freibergite(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe22+Sb4S12
Fe Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
Fe Arsenopyrite (var: Danaite)(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
Fe Muscovite (var: Phengite)KAl1.5(Mg,Fe)0.5(Al0.5Si3.5O10)(OH)2
CoCobalt
Co ErythriteCo3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
Co Arsenopyrite (var: Danaite)(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
NiNickel
Ni GersdorffiteNiAsS
Ni MilleriteNiS
Ni NickelineNiAs
Ni Népouite(Ni,Mg)3(Si2O5)(OH)4
Ni Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
CuCopper
Cu CopperCu
Cu TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu Freibergite(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe22+Sb4S12
Cu CovelliteCuS
ZnZinc
Zn TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn Serpentine SubgroupD3[Si2O5](OH)4 D = Mg, Fe, Ni, Mn, Al, Zn
AsArsenic
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS
As ErythriteCo3(AsO4)2 · 8H2O
As GersdorffiteNiAsS
As NickelineNiAs
As ProustiteAg3AsS3
As Arsenopyrite (var: Danaite)(Fe0.90Co0.10)AsS - (Fe0.65Co0.35)AsS
AgSilver
Ag SilverAg
Ag Native Amalgam(Ag,Hg)
Ag Freibergite(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe22+Sb4S12
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
Ag ProustiteAg3AsS3
Ag ChlorargyriteAgCl
SbAntimony
Sb TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Sb Freibergite(Ag,Cu,◻)10Fe22+Sb4S12
Sb PyrargyriteAg3SbS3
TeTellurium
Te TelluriumTe
PtPlatinum
Pt PlatinumPt
AuGold
Au GoldAu
HgMercury
Hg Native Amalgam(Ag,Hg)
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb Galena (var: Argentiferous Galena)PbS

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Ransome, Frederick Leslie (1900), Description of the Mother Lode district, California: USGS Geological Atlas, Mother Lode (folio No. 63), 11 pp.
Storms, William H. (1900), The Mother Lode region of California: California Mining Bureau. Bulletin 18: 143-146.
Lowell, F. L. (1916), Mines and mineral resources of the counties of Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Mariposa, Merced, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus: California Mining Bureau. (Report 14): 14: 579, 581, 599-600.
Castello, W.O. (1921), Mariposa County: California Mining Bureau. Report 17: 91-93, 98, 111, 113, 137 & 142.
Knopf, Adolf (1929), The Mother Lode system of California: USGS Professional Paper 157, 88 pp.; […(abstract): Engineering & Mining Journal: 128: 24 (1929); […Geol. Zentralbl., Band 41: 364-367 (1930)]: 83-85.
Logan, Clarence August (1934), Mother Lode Gold Belt of California: California Division Mines Bulletin 108, 221 pp.: 180-190, Pl. X.
Bowen, O.E., Jr. & C.H. Gray, Jr. (1957), Mines and mineral deposits of Mariposa County, California: California Journal of Mines and Geology (Report 53): 53(1&2): 128-130, 151-158.
Bowen, W.E. and Evans (1966).
Clark, Wm. B. (1970a) Gold districts of California: California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 193: 29.
Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 24 (map 2-13).

Localities in this Region


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