SUPPORT US. If mindat.org is important to you, click here to donate to our Fall 2019 fundraiser!
Log InRegister
Home PageAbout MindatThe Mindat ManualHistory of MindatCopyright StatusWho We AreContact UsAdvertise on Mindat
Donate to MindatCorporate SponsorshipSponsor a PageSponsored PagesMindat AdvertisersAdvertise on Mindat
Learning CenterWhat is a mineral?The most common minerals on earthInformation for EducatorsMindat ArticlesThe ElementsBooks & Magazines
Minerals by PropertiesMinerals by ChemistryAdvanced Locality SearchRandom MineralRandom LocalitySearch by minIDLocalities Near MeSearch ArticlesSearch GlossaryMore Search Options
Search For:
Mineral Name:
Locality Name:
Keyword(s):
 
The Mindat ManualAdd a New PhotoRate PhotosLocality Edit ReportCoordinate Completion ReportAdd Glossary Item
Mining CompaniesStatisticsUsersMineral MuseumsMineral Shows & EventsThe Mindat DirectoryDevice Settings
Photo SearchPhoto GalleriesNew Photos TodayNew Photos YesterdayMembers' Photo GalleriesPast Photo of the Day GalleryMineral Photography

Ward Mining District, Boulder Co., Colorado, USAi
Regional Level Types
Ward Mining DistrictMining District
Boulder Co.County
ColoradoState
USACountry

This page is currently not sponsored. Click here to sponsor this page.
Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
40° North , 105° West (est.)
Estimate based on other nearby localities or region boundaries.
Margin of Error:
~34km
Locality type:


The Ward district takes in the headwaters of Lefthand Creek and Fourmile Creek and includes the area near Sunset and Copper Rock. The town of Ward is 12 miles west of the mountain front and about 19 miles from Boulder by automobile road. It lies at an altitude of 9,200 feet, but the hills just to the west reach 10,400 feet, and the valley bottoms a few miles east range from 7,500 to 8,000 feet. The town of Sunset, at the junction of Fourmile Creek with Pennsylvania Gulch, is about 3 miles southeast of Ward and about 10 miles west of Boulder. It had a population of less than 20 in 1940, and Copper Rock, 1 1/2 miles to the east, was uninhabited.

The Ward district was one of the first discovered in Boulder County and has been one of its most productive. In 1861 gold was found by Calvin Ward, just east of Indiana Gulch on the hillside north of Lefthand Creek. In 1862 the Columbia vein was found by John Deardorf, and soon afterwards the town of Ward was founded. Before 1870 nearly all the important lodes in the district had been discovered, and oxidized ore was being treated in several mills, including the outstanding Niwot Mill, which was built in 1865 and was operated steadily for many years. Several attempts have been made to build a mill that would treat the primary low-grade pyritic gold ores economically, but so far none have been entirely satisfactory.

ORE DEPOSITS: Gold, silver, lead, copper, zinc, and tungsten, in the order named, are the valuable constituents in the ores of the Ward district, and of them, gold, silver, and lead have been responsible for most of the output. Nearly all the ore occurs in tabular shoots or in chimneys of roughly elliptical cross section that appear to be local enlargements of veins. The largest of the chimneys, in the White Raven mine, is about 30 feet wide and extends 200 feet along the vein. The most productive veins have been found in the granite or the granite gneiss along dikes of quartz monzonite, quartz latite, latite, and felsite, but some of the dikes are later than the ore. The veins in the Idaho Springs formation are much less continuous and in general are of lower grade. In many places well-defined veins in granite and gneiss feather out in the schist. Post-mineral faulting is common, but the displacement of the veins is generally small, as most of the movement has occurred along the vein fissure. In nearly every place where such faults cut across the vein the faulted segments have been found with little difficulty.
Although there are approximately 200 mines in the Ward district that have supplied some ore, probably not more than 50 have supplied ore having a gross value of more than $5,000 and probably not more than 15 have had an output valued at more than $100,000. Of this group the Baxter, Columbia, Niwot, Madelaine, Sullivan No. 5, and Utica are on the Columbia vein. Among the other productive mines are the Celestial, Celestial Extension, and Morning Star on the Celestial vein. The output of the Big Five property came from the White Raven vein system and the Columbia vein. The B. and M., the Ruby, the U. P. group, the Ward Rose, and the White Raven are the other mines credited with an output valued at more than $100,000 each.

Pyritic gold-silver ore.-The gangue minerals of the pyritic gold-silver ores are chiefly quartz with some fluorite and sericite. Most of the quartz is early and is massive and white, but druses of colorless quartz crystals are late. Nearly all the gold mined in the district has been found in the quartz veins associated with pyrite or chaleopyrite or both. Ore containing chalcopyrite is commonly richer in gold than ore containing only pyrite. Silver occurs with the gold and chalcopyrite but is most abundant in the galena ore. Many assays of the pyritic gold-silver ore indicate that the average proportion of silver to gold is about 10: 1 by weight; the two are apparently alloyed. Although chalcopyrite is generally much less abundant than pyrite, locally the reverse is true. Molybdenite and wolframite are economically unimportant but are present in most of the pyritic gold veins and seem most abundant in the deep workings. Wolframite is earlier than chalcopyrite and most of the pyrite.

Enrichment of the pyritic gold ores in the oxidized zone above the water table has been responsible for an the rich free-milling gold ore in the region. The level of ground water in the Ward district ranges from 50 to 250 feet below the surface of the ground but in general is not more than 100 feet. The enriched zone is clearly defined in all the pyritic veins. Near the surface the vein minerals are oxidized, and limonite is abundant. The iron-stained quartz is loose and honeycombed and contains drusy cavities lined with late quartz crystals. This "rotten quartz" is well known for high values in gold. Below the water level the gold tenor of the pyritic gold ore is commonly 0.1 to 0.5 ounce to the ton, but in the oxidized zone much of the ore contains 3 or more ounces of gold to the ton.

Lead-silver ore.- The lead-silver ore is largely limited to the White Raven vein system. The gangue minerals are calcite and barite. Galena is abundant and is usually in large well-formed crystals. Silver alloyed with gold occurs as a primary mineral included in the galena. Sphalerite is not abundant except locally. Gray copper (tennantite) occurs sparingly below the 700-foot level. Galena, primary silver, and gold are apparently contemporaneous with some calcite and are earlier than barite and a second generation of calcite. Later than all these minerals is abundant supergene wire silver, which has been found between level 6 and the top of the water table in the White Raven mine. In the oxidized zone the silver content is somewhat lower than immediately below the water table. Gold is not an important constituent of the silver-lead ore. Zinc is commercially unimportant and where found is a minor constituent of the ore.

Copper Ore.-In most of the mines of the Ward region copper-bearing ore has been valuable chiefly for its gold content, but both chalcopyrite and chalcocite are sufficiently abundant to be of commercial interest. From the Sunset area, in the southeastern part of the district, chalcopyrite ore has been shipped in which the content of gold and silver were of less value than that of copper, which approximated 20 percent. Chalcopyrite is everywhere the most important copper mineral and occurs chiefly with pyrite in pyritic gold-copper ore.

Gold-telluride ore.-Gold-telluride ore has been found locally in some of the mines. It is common on the eastern side of the Ward district and has also been reported from the Morning Star mine in Spring Gulch.

Tungsten ore.- Wolframite intimately associated with quartz and pyrite and with a small amount of chalcopyrite is widely scattered through the veins of the Ward district. It is not found far south of Ward and is most abundant north of town and in the eastern part of the district near Gold Lake.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate
Rocky Mountains, North AmericaMountain Range

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded from this region.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

35 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

Note: this is a very new system on mindat.org and data is currently VERY limited. Please bear with us while we work towards adding this information!

Rock list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

Select Rock List Type

Alphabetical List Tree Diagram

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
'Albite-Anorthite Series'
Altaite
Formula: PbTe
Azurite
Formula: Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
Reference: Rocks & Min.: 24:231.; U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 223
Beryl
Formula: Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Bornite
Formula: Cu5FeS4
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 223
Cervelleite
Formula: Ag4TeS
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Chalcocite
Formula: Cu2S
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Localities: Reported from at least 8 localities in this region.
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Coloradoite
Formula: HgTe
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'
Copper
Formula: Cu
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Dawsonite
Formula: NaAlCO3(OH)2
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
'Electrum'
Formula: (Au, Ag)
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 223
Fizélyite
Formula: Ag5Pb14Sb21S48
Galena
Formula: PbS
Gold
Formula: Au
Localities: Reported from at least 29 localities in this region.
Hessite
Formula: Ag2Te
Hübnerite
Formula: MnWO4
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Jalpaite
Formula: Ag3CuS2
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
'K Feldspar'
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Krennerite
Formula: Au3AgTe8
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
'Mica Group'
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Molybdenite
Formula: MoS2
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Pearceite
Formula: [Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) E.B. Eckel
Petzite
Formula: Ag3AuTe2
Polybasite
Formula: [(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Localities: Reported from at least 10 localities in this region.
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Localities: Reported from at least 12 localities in this region.
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.
Samarskite-(Y)
Formula: YFe3+Nb2O8
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) E.B. Eckel
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Silver
Formula: Ag
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Stibnite
Formula: Sb2S3
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) E.B. Eckel
Sylvanite
Formula: (Au,Ag)2Te4
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) E.B. Eckel
'Tantalite'
Formula: (Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Tennantite
Formula: Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 223
Weissite ?
Formula: Cu2-xTe
'Wolframite'
Formula: (Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4
Reference: Minerals of Colorado (1997) Eckel, E. B.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
'Electrum'1.AA.05(Au, Ag)
Gold1.AA.05Au
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Acanthite2.BA.35Ag2S
Altaite2.CD.10PbTe
Bornite2.BA.15Cu5FeS4
Cervelleite2.BA.60Ag4TeS
Chalcocite2.BA.05Cu2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Coloradoite2.CB.05aHgTe
Fizélyite2.JB.40aAg5Pb14Sb21S48
Galena2.CD.10PbS
Hessite2.BA.60Ag2Te
Jalpaite2.BA.45Ag3CuS2
Krennerite2.EA.15Au3AgTe8
Molybdenite2.EA.30MoS2
Pearceite2.GB.15[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Petzite2.BA.75Ag3AuTe2
Polybasite2.GB.15[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Stibnite2.DB.05Sb2S3
Sylvanite2.EA.05(Au,Ag)2Te4
Tennantite2.GB.05Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
Weissite ?2.BA.30Cu2-xTe
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Hübnerite4.DB.30MnWO4
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Samarskite-(Y)4.DB.25YFe3+Nb2O8
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Azurite5.BA.05Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Dawsonite5.BB.10NaAlCO3(OH)2
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Group 9 - Silicates
Beryl9.CJ.05Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'K Feldspar'-
'Mica Group'-
'Tantalite'-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
'Wolframite'-(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Gold1.1.1.1Au
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
Chalcocite2.4.7.1Cu2S
Hessite2.4.2.1Ag2Te
Jalpaite2.4.4.1Ag3CuS2
Petzite2.4.3.3Ag3AuTe2
Weissite ?2.4.8.1Cu2-xTe
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 3:2
Bornite2.5.2.1Cu5FeS4
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Altaite2.8.1.3PbTe
Coloradoite2.8.2.5HgTe
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:3
Stibnite2.11.2.1Sb2S3
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Krennerite2.12.13.1Au3AgTe8
Molybdenite2.12.10.1MoS2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Sylvanite2.12.13.3(Au,Ag)2Te4
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
ø > 4
Pearceite3.1.8.1[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Polybasite3.1.7.2[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
3 <ø < 4
Tennantite3.3.6.2Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
ø = 3
Fizélyite3.4.15.8Ag5Pb14Sb21S48
Group 8 - MULTIPLE OXIDES CONTAINING NIOBIUM,TANTALUM OR TITANIUM
ABO4
Samarskite-(Y)8.1.11.1YFe3+Nb2O8
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Azurite16a.2.1.1Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Dawsonite16a.3.8.1NaAlCO3(OH)2
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Hübnerite48.1.1.1MnWO4
Group 61 - CYCLOSILICATES Six-Membered Rings
Six-Membered Rings with [Si6O18] rings; possible (OH) and Al substitution
Beryl61.1.1.1Be3Al2(Si6O18)
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Albite-Anorthite Series'-
Cervelleite-Ag4TeS
'Columbite-(Fe)-Columbite-(Mn) Series'-
'Electrum'-(Au, Ag)
'K Feldspar'-
'Mica Group'-
'Tantalite'-(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
'Wolframite'-(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
H DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
BeBeryllium
Be BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
CCarbon
C SideriteFeCO3
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
C DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O BaryteBaSO4
O SideriteFeCO3
O BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
O Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
O HübneriteMnWO4
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
O QuartzSiO2
O Wolframite(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4
O DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
O Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
O CalciteCaCO3
NaSodium
Na DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
AlAluminium
Al BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Al DawsoniteNaAlCO3(OH)2
SiSilicon
Si BerylBe3Al2(Si6O18)
Si QuartzSiO2
SSulfur
S AcanthiteAg2S
S GalenaPbS
S SphaleriteZnS
S BaryteBaSO4
S BorniteCu5FeS4
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S ChalcociteCu2S
S PyriteFeS2
S CervelleiteAg4TeS
S FizélyiteAg5Pb14Sb21S48
S JalpaiteAg3CuS2
S Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
S MolybdeniteMoS2
S Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
S StibniteSb2S3
S TennantiteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
MnManganese
Mn Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Mn HübneriteMnWO4
Mn Wolframite(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4
FeIron
Fe SideriteFeCO3
Fe Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Fe BorniteCu5FeS4
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe Wolframite(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4
Fe Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
Fe TennantiteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
CuCopper
Cu CopperCu
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Cu BorniteCu5FeS4
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu ChalcociteCu2S
Cu JalpaiteAg3CuS2
Cu Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Cu Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Cu TennantiteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
Cu WeissiteCu2-xTe
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn TennantiteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
AsArsenic
As Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
As Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
As TennantiteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2As4S12S
YYttrium
Y Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
NbNiobium
Nb Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
Nb Samarskite-(Y)YFe3+Nb2O8
MoMolybdenum
Mo MolybdeniteMoS2
AgSilver
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag SilverAg
Ag CervelleiteAg4TeS
Ag HessiteAg2Te
Ag FizélyiteAg5Pb14Sb21S48
Ag JalpaiteAg3CuS2
Ag Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Ag KrenneriteAu3AgTe8
Ag PetziteAg3AuTe2
Ag Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Ag Sylvanite(Au,Ag)2Te4
Ag Electrum(Au, Ag)
SbAntimony
Sb FizélyiteAg5Pb14Sb21S48
Sb Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Sb Pearceite[Ag9CuS4][(Ag,Cu)6(As,Sb)2S7]
Sb StibniteSb2S3
TeTellurium
Te AltaitePbTe
Te CervelleiteAg4TeS
Te HessiteAg2Te
Te ColoradoiteHgTe
Te KrenneriteAu3AgTe8
Te PetziteAg3AuTe2
Te Sylvanite(Au,Ag)2Te4
Te WeissiteCu2-xTe
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
TaTantalum
Ta Tantalite(Mn,Fe)(Ta,Nb)2O6
WTungsten
W HübneriteMnWO4
W Wolframite(Fe2+)WO4 to (Mn2+)WO4
AuGold
Au GoldAu
Au KrenneriteAu3AgTe8
Au PetziteAg3AuTe2
Au Sylvanite(Au,Ag)2Te4
Au Electrum(Au, Ag)
HgMercury
Hg ColoradoiteHgTe
PbLead
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb AltaitePbTe
Pb FizélyiteAg5Pb14Sb21S48

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Lovering, T.S.and E.N. Goddard (1950), Geology and ore deposits of the Front Range, Colorado, USGS Professional Paper 223, 319 pp.

Localities in this Region


This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.
 
Mineral and/or Locality  
Mindat.org is an outreach project of the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization. Public Relations by Blytheweigh.
Copyright © mindat.org and the Hudson Institute of Mineralogy 1993-2019, except where stated. Most political location boundaries are © OpenStreetMap contributors. Mindat.org relies on the contributions of thousands of members and supporters.
Privacy Policy - Terms & Conditions - Contact Us Current server date and time: December 11, 2019 20:37:57 Page generated: July 21, 2019 22:24:09
Go to top of page