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Lovers Lane Quarry, Toodyay Shire, Western Australia, Australia

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 31° 35' 56'' South , 116° 24' 10'' East
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): -31.59906,116.40305
GeoHash:G#: qd6u0zd45
Locality type:Quarry
Köppen climate type:Csa : Hot-summer Mediterranean climate


Lovers lane is a road, about 5 kilometres south-west of Toodyay in the Jimperding Valley, part of the Avon valley. References describe a wide area for andalusite and chiastolite, which extends beyond this valley.

The material occurs within the Jimperding Metamorphic Belt of metasedimentary rocks and subordinate mafic rocks, extending north north-west by over 120 kilometres, 15 to 65 kilometres in width. The rocks show a progressively eastwards increase in metamorphic grade from lower amphibolite to granulite facies, with the presence of andalusite, sillimanite and cordierite indicator minerals.

The andulusite is found as bluish porphyroblasts to 20mm in length in a reddish matrix of mica, quartz, minor feldspar, and sillimanite, and associated with units of quartzite and banded iron formation.

Locations within the belt mentioned is Jimperding Valley, where andalusite crystals are said to be abundant (at least in the early Twentieth Century when described). These occur at several points over a fair distance of 16 kilometres, from Garbadine Hill in the south-east to Julimar Brook in the north-west. They occur in a belt of Precambrian mica schist about 800 metres wide. Imperfect prisms of andalusite are numerous on the surface, forming 5-10% of the ground in some places. Carbon dust causes most of the material to be dark grey, with crystals up to 60mm. They form sharply outlined prisms with poorly defined terminations, some having chiastolite structures. Another site noted is 2.4 kilometres east south-east of Jimperding Valley, where again crystals may reach 60mm in length, but are covered by a coating of coarse mica as an integral part of the crystal. There are many other localities along the belt.

The Lovers Lane Quarry specifically relates to what is marketed as Toodyay Stone, used extensively in building and landscaping in Perth. At the quarry it is a red brown to mid brown quartzite. Within the quarry a quartz dyke has intruded of pale pink coarse grained rose quartz.

Several sheds, stacked stone, and mullock pile are on a flat area at the base of the hill, while the quarry is several hundred metres up the hill to the east. The Black and Tan Quarry, and Salt Valley Quarry are also in the area, also used as a source for Toodyay Stone. The reference states the last mining at Lovers Lane was in 2004.



Mineral List


4 valid minerals.

Rock Types Recorded

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Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Archean
2500 - 4000 Ma



ID: 883766
quartzite, schist 74469

Age: Archean (2500 - 4000 Ma)

Description: Quartzite +/- kyanite, sillimanite, muscovite/fuchsite, garnet, hornblende, clinopyroxene, epidote; psammitic and pelitic schists +/- garnet, felsic gneiss and hornfels, quartz-mica-graphite schist, metaconglomerate, cordierite-bearing rock

Comments: metasedimentary siliciclastic; synthesis of multiple published descriptions

Lithology: Metasedimentary siliciclastic

Reference: Raymond, O.L., Liu, S., Gallagher, R., Zhang, W., Highet, L.M. Surface Geology of Australia 1:1 million scale dataset 2012 edition. Commonwealth of Australia (Geoscience Australia). [5]

Neoarchean - Mesoarchean
2500 - 3200 Ma



ID: 3189638
Archean crystalline metamorphic rocks

Age: Archean (2500 - 3200 Ma)

Comments: Yilgarn Craton

Lithology: Amphibolite/granulite grade orthogneiss

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License



This page contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

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Fetherston J.M., Stocklmayer, S.M., Stocklmayer, V.C., (2013) Gemstones of Western Australia. Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral Resources Bulletin 25, 306p (p168).
Fetherston, J.M. (2007) Dimension stone in Western Australia: Volume 1 — Industry review and dimension stones of the Southwest Region: Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral Resources Bulletin 23, 181p.

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