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Stevenson Mine (Burke's Copper Mine), Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut, USAi
Regional Level Types
Stevenson Mine (Burke's Copper Mine)Mine
Oxford- not defined -
New Haven Co.County
ConnecticutState
USACountry

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Key
Lock Map
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 41° 23' 43'' North , 73° 9' 59'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): 41.39528,-73.16639
GeoHash:G#: dr7grpcbg
Locality type:Mine
Köppen climate type:Cfa : Humid subtropical climate
Nearest Settlements:
PlacePopulationDistance
Oxford11,345 (2017)6.0km
Seymour16,562 (2017)7.5km
Ansonia18,854 (2017)9.1km
Southbury19,836 (2017)10.3km
Derby12,700 (2017)10.5km


A very small mine worked chalcopyrite disseminated in a marble layer beneath amphibolite at the base of the Devonian-Silurian The Straits Schist. This summary is from Harte (1944):

The Stevenson mine is about eight miles from Derby, on Bowers’ Hill, in Oxford. It was opened some time before the Civil War by an English company, and mining was continued, though with unsatisfactory returns, until some time after 1864, the ore being smelted at Derby. Other than that the company had excavated “a huge hole”, and that it had two buildings there, no information has been uncovered as to the extent of these operations.

About 1896, A. B. Hendryx of New Haven purchased the property, and anticipating success and a rise in values, leased, with the right of purchase, a large area of adjoining land. Work on the project was vigorously pushed, although there is some question as to just what was done. An unsigned article in the New Haven Sunday Register of July 19, 1931, says:
“The shaft runs 165 feet on an incline into the earth”…
“A shaft about 15 feet wide and 10 feet high was sunk on an incline.”

W. H. Weed, in the United States Geological Survey Bulletin No. 455, however, quotes E. C. Eckel as saying:
“An inclined shaft 5 feet wide by 5 feet high follows down on the ore to a depth of 125 feet on the dip.”
This time the ore was shipped to New Jersey for smelting, a narrow gauge railway, the little cars of which were hauled up, at first by a horse-operated windlass and later by a steam engine, bringing it to the surface.

But although in the few years he operated it Mr. Hendryx is said to have sunk some $12,000 in the project, it could not be made to pay. Eckel reported that the ore bed was said to yield from 20 to 30 per cent chalcopyrite which theoretically should yield from 7 to 10 1/2 per cent of copper. That is enough to make the mining profitable if the operating is efficient. The Register article, however, said that the ore assayed but 4 per cent metal.

Today only the dumps and a shaft filled with ice-cold water - it is said, however, that it never freezes - remains to mark the project.


Former local residents report that the entrance was bulldozed shut some time in the 1960s or 1970s.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlatePlate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded at this locality.


Mineral List


11 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Arsenopyrite
Formula: FeAsS
Aurichalcite
Formula: (Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Devilline ?
Formula: CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Diopside
Formula: CaMgSi2O6
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
'Hornblende'
Langite
Formula: Cu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Tremolite
Formula: ☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Arsenopyrite2.EB.20FeAsS
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aurichalcite5.BA.15(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Devilline ?7.DD.30CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Langite7.DD.10Cu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
Group 9 - Silicates
Diopside9.DA.15CaMgSi2O6
Tremolite9.DE.10☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Hornblende'-

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Arsenopyrite2.12.4.1FeAsS
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Aurichalcite16a.4.2.1(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Group 31 - HYDRATED SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)4(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Langite31.4.3.1Cu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
(AB)5(XO4)2Zq·xH2O
Devilline ?31.6.1.1CaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
Group 65 - INOSILICATES Single-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=1)
Single-Width Unbranched Chains, W=1 with chains P=2
Diopside65.1.3a.1CaMgSi2O6
Group 66 - INOSILICATES Double-Width,Unbranched Chains,(W=2)
Amphiboles - Mg-Fe-Mn-Li subgroup
Tremolite66.1.3a.1☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Hornblende'-

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H LangiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
H Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
H DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
CCarbon
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
C CalciteCaCO3
OOxygen
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O LangiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
O Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
O CalciteCaCO3
O DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
O DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
MgMagnesium
Mg Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Mg DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
SiSilicon
Si Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Si DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
SSulfur
S SphaleriteZnS
S ArsenopyriteFeAsS
S LangiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
CaCalcium
Ca Tremolite☐{Ca2}{Mg5}(Si8O22)(OH)2
Ca CalciteCaCO3
Ca DiopsideCaMgSi2O6
Ca DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
FeIron
Fe ArsenopyriteFeAsS
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
CuCopper
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Cu LangiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6 · 2H2O
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu DevillineCaCu4(SO4)2(OH)6 · 3H2O
ZnZinc
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
AsArsenic
As ArsenopyriteFeAsS

Regional Geology

This geological map and associated information on rock units at or nearby to the coordinates given for this locality is based on relatively small scale geological maps provided by various national Geological Surveys. This does not necessarily represent the complete geology at this locality but it gives a background for the region in which it is found.

Click on geological units on the map for more information. Click here to view full-screen map on Macrostrat.org

Silurian
419.2 - 443.8 Ma



ID: 2865428
Basal member [of The Straits Schist]

Age: Silurian (419.2 - 443.8 Ma)

Stratigraphic Name: The Straits Schist

Description: ( = Russell Mountain Formation of Massachusetts) - Distinguished by presence of layers of amphibolite, marble, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite within more uniform schist like that on either side. Minor, unevenly distributed mineralization in W, Bi, Cu, Ni, and other metals.

Comments: Part of Central Lowlands; Iapetus (Oceanic) Terrane - Connecticut Valley Synclinorium; Hartland Belt Original map source: Connecticut Geological and Natural History Survey, DEP, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, 2000, Bedrock Geology of Connecticut, shapefile, scale 1:50,000

Lithology: Major:{schist,amphibolite,marble}, Minor:{calc silicate rock,quartzite}

Reference: Horton, J.D., C.A. San Juan, and D.B. Stoeser. The State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) geodatabase of the conterminous United States. doi: 10.3133/ds1052. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1052. [133]

Ordovician - Neoproterozoic
443.8 - 1000 Ma



ID: 3190671
Precambrian-Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks

Age: Neoproterozoic to Ordovician (443.8 - 1000 Ma)

Lithology: Mudstone-carbonate-sandstone-conglomerate

Reference: Chorlton, L.B. Generalized geology of the world: bedrock domains and major faults in GIS format: a small-scale world geology map with an extended geological attribute database. doi: 10.4095/223767. Geological Survey of Canada, Open File 5529. [154]

Data and map coding provided by Macrostrat.org, used under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

References

Sort by

Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Shepard, Charles U. (1837), A Report on the Geological Survey of Connecticut. Hamlen, New Haven.
Schairer, J. F. (1931), The Minerals of Connecticut. State Geological and Natural History Survey, Hartford Connecticut Bulletin 51.
Harte, Charles Rufus. (1944), Connecticut's Iron and Copper. 60th Annual Report of The Connecticut Society of Civil Engineers, Incorporated.
Januzzi, Ronald E. (1994), Mineral Data Book - Western Connecticut and Environs. Mineralogical Press, Danbury, Connecticut.

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