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D'Orbigny meteorite, D'Orbigny, Coronel Suaréz, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Latitude & Longitude (WGS84): 37° 0'' South , 61° 60'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal): -37.6666666667, -61.65
Name(s) in local language(s):D'Orbigny meteorite, D'Orbigny, partido de Coronel Suaréz, provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina


Angrite, volcanic.

A 16.55 kg stone, mostly covered with dark gray fusion crust, was found in 1979 in a corn field after a farmer hit it with a plow. Two decades after its recovery, D'Orbigny was classified as an angrite. In fact, D'Orbigny is by far the most massive Angrite. Angrites are characterized by their low alkali contents, high Ca/Al ratios, and a somewhat variable but still distinctive mineral assemblage (e.g., various Ca, Al, &/or Ti-rich phases).

Angrites are also very ancient rocks. Recent crystallization ages ≥4.562 billion years have been reported for D'Orbigny (Amelin, 2007; Spivak-Birndorf et al., 2009) making it one of the oldest known differentiated rocks in the solar system.


Note on the mineral list:
http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php?code=7714 also mentions a silicophosphate (probably a "silicoapatite").

Mineral List


20 valid minerals. 3 (TL) - type locality of valid minerals.

The above list contains all mineral locality references listed on mindat.org. This does not claim to be a complete list. If you know of more minerals from this site, please register so you can add to our database. This locality information is for reference purposes only. You should never attempt to visit any sites listed in mindat.org without first ensuring that you have the permission of the land and/or mineral rights holders for access and that you are aware of all safety precautions necessary.

References

Kurat et al. (2004): Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 68, 1901–1921.

Amelin, Y. (2007) The Ages of Angrites: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVIII. LPI Contribution No. 1338, pdf.1669. (March 2007)

Spivak-Birndorf, Lev, Wadhwa, Meenakshi & Janney, Philip (2009) 26Al-26Mg systematics in D’Orbigny and Sahara 99555 angrites: Implications for high-resolution chronology using extinct chronometers. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 73 (17): 5202-5211. (Sept 2009)

Jambon, A. & Boudouma, O. (2011). Evidence for Rhönite in Angrites D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555: 74th Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society. Meteoritics & Planetary Science Supplement, id.5167. (Sept 2011)

Keil, K. (2012) Angrites, a small but diverse suite of ancient, silica-undersaturated volcanic-plutonic mafic meteorites, and the history of their parent asteroid: Chemie der Erde, geochemistry 71:191-218.

Hwang, S.-L., Shen, P., Chu, H.-T., Yui, T.-F., Varela, M.-E., Iizuka, Y. (2016): Kuratite, Ca4(Fe2+10Ti2)O4[Si8Al4O36], the Fe2+-analogue of rhönite, a new mineral from the D'Orbigny angrite meteorite. Mineralogical Magazine: 80: 1067-1076

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