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Cerro Gordo, Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo Mts (Inyo Range), Inyo Co., California, USAi
Regional Level Types
Cerro GordoTown
Cerro Gordo Mining DistrictMining District
Inyo Mts (Inyo Range)Mountain Range
Inyo Co.County
CaliforniaState
USACountry

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Key
Latitude & Longitude (WGS84):
36° 32' 16'' North , 117° 47' 42'' West
Latitude & Longitude (decimal):
Locality type:
Town - last checked 2019
Köppen climate type:


A populated place (former mining boom town).

Cerro Gordo, on the western slope of the Inyo Mountains about seven miles east of Keeler and thirty miles south of Independence, was the first major silver strike in Owens Valley. Originally a small-scale operation worked by Mexicans between 1862 and 1866, the mine was included in the Lone Pine Mining District organized in April 1866. Three years later Americans took over the property and ultimately turned it into the largest producer of silver and lead in California, yielding ores that assayed at least as high as $300 per ton. In the early 1870s two smelters were erected at Cerro Gordo and one on Owens Lake near the rival town of Swansea. Contributing to Cerro Gordo's commercial success was the fact that this was an excellent area for smelting works: water and wood were abundant, good fire-clay was available, and because of the wide variety of ores in the district, necessary fluxes were obtainable. Productive mines of the area were the historic Union Mine, and the later Cerro Gordo, Cerro Gordo Extension, Estelle, Silver Reef, and Santa Rosa mines. Mule teams transported the ore to Los Angeles, 275 miles away, necessitating high-class ore and bullion in order to make a profit. In 1875 Cerro Gordo suffered a series of setbacks, necessitating the shutdown of its furnaces. These problems resulted from a scarcity of ore in the mine, which had lasted for several months, and the temporary drying up of its water supply; no small factor in the slowdown of production was the litigation that had been initiated in 1870 over ownership of the Union lode. This latter question was finally settled, and on 13 January 1876 the Union Consolidated Mining Company of Cerro Gordo was created and preparations made to return to full-scale production. The revival was not destined to last, however, and by late 1876 and early 1877 the Union Mine appeared to be played out. A fire that raged through some of the mine buildings and the Union shaft was the final straw; the furnaces were closed the following February. A more lethal blow was dealt by falling lead and silver prices, effectively ending this era of activity at Cerro Gordo.

By 1905 mining activity was reviving in the Panamint region, and hope was seen for many of the old productive mines. Cerro Gordo was purchased by the Great Western Ore Purchasing and Reduction Company, which envisioned building a 100-ton smelter for custom work and also to process ore left on the Cerro Gordo dumps, earlier considered too low grade for the technological methods then in use. By modern methods the ore could be worked profitably.

By 1907 high-grade zinc was found in the old Cerro Gordo stopes, and ore shipments were begun. In 1912 the Cerro Gordo group, whose property now consisted of tunnels and shafts and an aerial tramway connecting the mine with the narrow-gauge Southern Pacific Railroad at Keeler, which had absorbed the old Carson & Colorado, was acquired by Utah mining men. Shipping 1,000 tons of ore daily, Cerro Gordo now became the largest producer of zinc carbonates in the United States. In 1920 about ten men were still employed by the Cerro Gordo mines company and silver-lead ore was being shipped. A few years later, in 1924, silver-lead ore on the old dumps was to be worked by concentration and flotation after five concentrators were installed in the Keeler mill. Gross production of the Cerro Gordo camp from its early profitable years up until 1938 was probably around $17 million. As a sidelight to this story, the old Swansea Mining District, seven miles southeast of Lone Pine and a competitor of Cerro Gordo in the 1860s, was also producing again in 1924 as its old dumps were slowly sampled.

Regions containing this locality

North America PlateTectonic Plate

Select Mineral List Type

Standard Detailed Strunz Dana Chemical Elements

Commodity List

This is a list of exploitable or exploited mineral commodities recorded from this region.


Mineral List

Mineral list contains entries from the region specified including sub-localities

47 valid minerals.

Detailed Mineral List:

Acanthite
Formula: Ag2S
Anglesite
Formula: PbSO4
Aurichalcite
Formula: (Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Reference: Rogers, Austin Flint (1912b), Notes on rare minerals from California: Columbia University, School of Mines Quarterly: 33: 374; Knopf, Adolf (1914b), Mineral resources of the Inyo and White Mountains, California: USGS Bulletin 540; Knopf, Adolf (1918a), A geologic reconnaissance of the Inyo Range and the eastern slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, California; with a section on the stratigraphy of the Inyo Range, by Edwin Kirk; USGS PP 110, 130 pp.: 115-116; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 43; Pemberton, H. Earl (1964a), Minerals new to California: The Mineralogist (August 1964): 32: 16; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 228, 229.
Azurite
Formula: Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Baryte
Formula: BaSO4
'Bindheimite'
Formula: Pb2Sb2O6O
Description: A common oxidation product in Pb ores.
Reference: Hanks, Henry Garber (1884), Fourth report of the State Mineralogist: California Mining Bureau. Report 4, 410 pp.: 71; Knopf, Adolf (1914b), Mineral resources of the Inyo and White Mountains, California: USGS Bulletin 540; Knopf, Adolf (1918a), A geologic reconnaissance of the Inyo Range and the eastern slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, California; with a section on the stratigraphy of the Inyo Range, by Edwin Kirk; USGS PP 110, 130 pp.: 114; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 43; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 184.
Bournonite
Formula: PbCuSbS3
Reference: Dana 7:I:409.
Brochantite
Formula: Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 543; Eakle, Arthur Starr (1908), Notes on some California minerals: University of California, Department of Geological Science Bulletin: 5: 228; Knopf, Adolf (1914b), Mineral resources of the Inyo and White Mountains, California: USGS Bulletin 540: 104-105; Knopf, Adolf (1918a), A geologic reconnaissance of the Inyo Range and the eastern slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, California; with a section on the stratigraphy of the Inyo Range, by Edwin Kirk; USGS PP 110, 130 pp: 114; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 298.
Calcite
Formula: CaCO3
Reference: USGS Bull 540
Caledonite
Formula: Pb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
Colour: Bright green
Reference: Raymond, Rossiter Worthington (1869), The mines of the West, Report to the Secretary of the Treasury, 256 pp., New York: 29; Rogers, Austin Flint (1901), Mineralogical notes: American Journal of Science, 4th. Series: 12: 46; Eakle, Arthur Starr (1908), Notes on some California minerals: University of California, Department of Geological Science Bulletin: 5: 228; Guild, Frank Nelson (1911), Mineralogische Notizen: Zeitschr. Kristallographie, Band 49: 330; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 43; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 234, 298, 299.
Cerussite
Formula: PbCO3
Chalcocite
Formula: Cu2S
Chalcopyrite
Formula: CuFeS2
Reference: Copper Handbook 1911
Chlorargyrite
Formula: AgCl
Description: Fairly abundant in the upper levels.
Reference: Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 123 (based on a p.c. from Woodhouse).
Chrysocolla
Formula: Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Copper
Formula: Cu
'Copper Stain'
Reference: Emmons and Becker (1885) Statistics and Technology of the precious Metals. Census reports Tenth census. June 1, 1880, Volume 13 By United States. Census office. 10th census, 1880, United States. Census Office
Covellite
Formula: CuS
Cuprite
Formula: Cu2O
Description: Occurs as massive material surrounding cores of copper.
Reference: Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 48.
Galena
Formula: PbS
Localities: Reported from at least 7 localities in this region.
Galena var: Argentiferous Galena
Formula: PbS
Geocronite
Formula: Pb14(Sb,As)6S23
Reference: Hanks, Henry Garber (1884), Fourth report of the State Mineralogist: California Mining Bureau. Report 4, 410 pp.: 182; Hanks, Henry Garber (1886), Sixth report of the State Mineralogist: California Mining Bureau. Report 6 part 1, 145 pp.: 110; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 198.
Goethite
Formula: α-Fe3+O(OH)
Gold
Formula: Au
Reference: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
Greenockite
Formula: CdS
Reference: www.mineralsocal.org
'Halloysite'
Formula: Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Colour: White, banded white & brown
Reference: Rogers, Austin Flint (1912b), Notes on rare minerals from California: Columbia University, School of Mines Quarterly: 33: 381; Knopf, Adolf (1918a), A geologic reconnaissance of the Inyo Range and the eastern slope of the southern Sierra Nevada, California; with a section on the stratigraphy of the Inyo Range, by Edwin Kirk; USGS PP 110, 130 pp.: 115; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 46; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 437.
Hemimorphite
Formula: Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Hydrozincite
Formula: Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Jamesonite
Formula: Pb4FeSb6S14
Reference: Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 232.
Leadhillite
Formula: Pb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
Colour: Pale sea-green tint
Description: Small, imperfect crystals.
Reference: Palache, C., Berman, H., & Frondel, C. (1951), The System of Mineralogy of James Dwight Dana and Edward Salisbury Dana, Yale University 1837-1892, Volume II: 298; Rogers, Austin Flint (1901), Mineralogical notes: American Journal of Science, 4th. Series: 12: 46; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 43; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 234, 299; www.mineralsocal.org.
'Limonite'
Formula: (Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Linarite
Formula: PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Liroconite
Formula: Cu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
Reference: Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 245.
Malachite
Formula: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Minium
Formula: Pb3O4
Mixite
Formula: BiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
Colour: Pale blue
Description: Occurs as needles in radiating clusters.
Reference: Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 267.
Plumbogummite ?
Formula: PbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Description: Reported.
Reference: Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 292.
Plumbojarosite
Formula: Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
Polybasite
Formula: [(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Pyrite
Formula: FeS2
Pyromorphite
Formula: Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Reference: www.mineralsocal.org
Quartz
Formula: SiO2
Rosasite
Formula: (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
Reference: Rogers, Austin Flint (1912b), Notes on rare minerals from California: Columbia University, School of Mines Quarterly: 33: 374; Merriam, Charles Warren (1963), Geology of the Cerro Gordo Mining District, Inyo County, California: USGS PP 408, 83 pp.: 43; Pemberton, H. Earl (1964a), Minerals new to California: The Mineralogist (August 1964): 32: 16; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 228.
Siderite
Formula: FeCO3
Reference: USGS Bull 625
Silver
Formula: Ag
Reference: WARING, C. A., 1915 , INYO COUNTY; 15TH REPT. STATE MINERALOGIST; CALIF. MIN. BUR., P. 106
Smithsonite
Formula: ZnCO3
Sphalerite
Formula: ZnS
Tenorite
Formula: CuO
Tetradymite
Formula: Bi2Te2S
Reference: www.mineralsocal.org
Tetrahedrite
Formula: Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Willemite
Formula: Zn2SiO4
Wulfenite
Formula: Pb(MoO4)
Reference: Raymond, Rossiter Worthington (1869), The mines of the West, Report to the Secretary of the Treasury, 256 pp., New York: 29; Murdoch, Joseph & Robert W. Webb (1966), Minerals of California, Centennial Volume (1866-1966): California Division Mines & Geology Bulletin 189: 388; Pemberton, H. Earl (1983), Minerals of California; Van Nostrand Reinholt Press: 339.

List of minerals arranged by Strunz 10th Edition classification

Group 1 - Elements
Copper1.AA.05Cu
Gold1.AA.05Au
Silver1.AA.05Ag
Group 2 - Sulphides and Sulfosalts
Acanthite2.BA.35Ag2S
Bournonite2.GA.50PbCuSbS3
Chalcocite2.BA.05Cu2S
Chalcopyrite2.CB.10aCuFeS2
Covellite2.CA.05aCuS
Galena2.CD.10PbS
var: Argentiferous Galena2.CD.10PbS
Geocronite2.JB.30aPb14(Sb,As)6S23
Greenockite2.CB.45CdS
Jamesonite2.HB.15Pb4FeSb6S14
Polybasite2.GB.15[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Pyrite2.EB.05aFeS2
Sphalerite2.CB.05aZnS
Tetradymite2.DC.05Bi2Te2S
Tetrahedrite2.GB.05Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Group 3 - Halides
Chlorargyrite3.AA.15AgCl
Group 4 - Oxides and Hydroxides
'Bindheimite'4.DH.20Pb2Sb2O6O
Cuprite4.AA.10Cu2O
Goethite4.00.α-Fe3+O(OH)
Minium4.BD.05Pb3O4
Quartz4.DA.05SiO2
Tenorite4.AB.10CuO
Group 5 - Nitrates and Carbonates
Aurichalcite5.BA.15(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Azurite5.BA.05Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Calcite5.AB.05CaCO3
Cerussite5.AB.15PbCO3
Hydrozincite5.BA.15Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Leadhillite5.BF.40Pb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
Malachite5.BA.10Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Rosasite5.BA.10(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
Siderite5.AB.05FeCO3
Smithsonite5.AB.05ZnCO3
Group 7 - Sulphates, Chromates, Molybdates and Tungstates
Anglesite7.AD.35PbSO4
Baryte7.AD.35BaSO4
Brochantite7.BB.25Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
Caledonite7.BC.50Pb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
Linarite7.BC.65PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Plumbojarosite7.BC.10Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
Wulfenite7.GA.05Pb(MoO4)
Group 8 - Phosphates, Arsenates and Vanadates
Liroconite8.DF.20Cu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
Mixite8.DL.15BiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
Plumbogummite ?8.BL.10PbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Pyromorphite8.BN.05Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Group 9 - Silicates
Chrysocolla9.ED.20Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
'Halloysite'9.ED.10Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Hemimorphite9.BD.10Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Willemite9.AA.05Zn2SiO4
Unclassified Minerals, Rocks, etc.
'Copper Stain'-
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)

List of minerals arranged by Dana 8th Edition classification

Group 1 - NATIVE ELEMENTS AND ALLOYS
Metals, other than the Platinum Group
Copper1.1.1.3Cu
Gold1.1.1.1Au
Silver1.1.1.2Ag
Group 2 - SULFIDES
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:1
Acanthite2.4.1.1Ag2S
Chalcocite2.4.7.1Cu2S
AmXp, with m:p = 1:1
Covellite2.8.12.1CuS
Galena2.8.1.1PbS
Greenockite2.8.7.2CdS
Sphalerite2.8.2.1ZnS
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:1
Chalcopyrite2.9.1.1CuFeS2
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 2:3
Tetradymite2.11.7.1Bi2Te2S
AmBnXp, with (m+n):p = 1:2
Pyrite2.12.1.1FeS2
Group 3 - SULFOSALTS
ø > 4
Polybasite3.1.7.2[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
3 <ø < 4
Geocronite3.3.1.2Pb14(Sb,As)6S23
Tetrahedrite3.3.6.1Cu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
ø = 3
Bournonite3.4.3.2PbCuSbS3
2 < ø < 2.49
Jamesonite3.6.7.1Pb4FeSb6S14
Group 4 - SIMPLE OXIDES
A2X
Cuprite4.1.1.1Cu2O
AX
Tenorite4.2.3.1CuO
Group 6 - HYDROXIDES AND OXIDES CONTAINING HYDROXYL
XO(OH)
Goethite6.1.1.2α-Fe3+O(OH)
Group 7 - MULTIPLE OXIDES
AB2X4
Minium7.2.8.1Pb3O4
Group 9 - NORMAL HALIDES
AX
Chlorargyrite9.1.4.1AgCl
Group 14 - ANHYDROUS NORMAL CARBONATES
A(XO3)
Calcite14.1.1.1CaCO3
Cerussite14.1.3.4PbCO3
Siderite14.1.1.3FeCO3
Smithsonite14.1.1.6ZnCO3
Group 16a - ANHYDROUS CARBONATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
Azurite16a.2.1.1Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Malachite16a.3.1.1Cu2(CO3)(OH)2
Rosasite16a.3.1.2(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
Aurichalcite16a.4.2.1(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Hydrozincite16a.4.1.1Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Group 17 - COMPOUND CARBONATES
Miscellaneous
Leadhillite17.1.2.1Pb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
Group 28 - ANHYDROUS ACID AND NORMAL SULFATES
AXO4
Anglesite28.3.1.3PbSO4
Baryte28.3.1.1BaSO4
Group 30 - ANHYDROUS SULFATES CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)m(XO4)pZq, where m:p>2:1
Brochantite30.1.3.1Cu4(SO4)(OH)6
(AB)2(XO4)Zq
Linarite30.2.3.1PbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Plumbojarosite30.2.5.6Pb0.5Fe3+3(SO4)2(OH)6
Group 32 - COMPOUND SULFATES
Anhydrous Compound Sulfates containing Hydroxyl or Halogen
Caledonite32.3.2.1Pb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
Group 41 - ANHYDROUS PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
A5(XO4)3Zq
Pyromorphite41.8.4.1Pb5(PO4)3Cl
Group 42 - HYDRATED PHOSPHATES, ETC.CONTAINING HYDROXYL OR HALOGEN
(AB)3(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Liroconite42.2.1.1Cu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
(AB)7(XO4)3Zq·xH2O
Mixite42.5.1.1BiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
(AB)2(XO4)Zq·xH2O
Plumbogummite ?42.7.3.5PbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
Group 44 - ANTIMONATES
A2X2O6(O,OH,F)
'Bindheimite'44.1.1.2Pb2Sb2O6O
Group 48 - ANHYDROUS MOLYBDATES AND TUNGSTATES
AXO4
Wulfenite48.1.3.1Pb(MoO4)
Group 51 - NESOSILICATES Insular SiO4 Groups Only
Insular SiO4 Groups Only with cations in [4] coordination
Willemite51.1.1.2Zn2SiO4
Group 56 - SOROSILICATES Si2O7 Groups, With Additional O, OH, F and H2O
Si2O7 Groups and O, OH, F, and H2O with cations in [4] coordination
Hemimorphite56.1.2.1Zn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Group 71 - PHYLLOSILICATES Sheets of Six-Membered Rings
Sheets of 6-membered rings with 1:1 layers
'Halloysite'71.1.1.4Al2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Group 74 - PHYLLOSILICATES Modulated Layers
Modulated Layers with joined strips
Chrysocolla74.3.2.1Cu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Group 75 - TECTOSILICATES Si Tetrahedral Frameworks
Si Tetrahedral Frameworks - SiO2 with [4] coordinated Si
Quartz75.1.3.1SiO2
Unclassified Minerals, Mixtures, etc.
'Copper Stain'-
Galena
var: Argentiferous Galena
-PbS
'Limonite'-(Fe,O,OH,H2O)

List of minerals for each chemical element

HHydrogen
H BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
H LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
H Rosasite(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
H Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
H CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
H HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
H HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
H LeadhillitePb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
H MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
H AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
H Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
H PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
H ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
H Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
H HalloysiteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
H LiroconiteCu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
H MixiteBiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
H PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
CCarbon
C CerussitePbCO3
C Rosasite(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
C SmithsoniteZnCO3
C Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
C CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
C HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
C LeadhillitePb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
C MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
C AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
C CalciteCaCO3
C SideriteFeCO3
OOxygen
O BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
O CerussitePbCO3
O LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
O Rosasite(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
O SmithsoniteZnCO3
O Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
O WulfenitePb(MoO4)
O AnglesitePbSO4
O CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
O HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
O BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
O WillemiteZn2SiO4
O HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
O LeadhillitePb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
O MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
O PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
O AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
O CalciteCaCO3
O Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
O MiniumPb3O4
O PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
O TenoriteCuO
O ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
O QuartzSiO2
O BaryteBaSO4
O Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
O HalloysiteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
O SideriteFeCO3
O LiroconiteCu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
O MixiteBiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
O CupriteCu2O
O PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
AlAluminium
Al ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Al HalloysiteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
Al LiroconiteCu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
Al PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
SiSilicon
Si HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Si WillemiteZn2SiO4
Si ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Si QuartzSiO2
Si HalloysiteAl2(Si2O5)(OH)4
PPhosphorus
P PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
P PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
SSulfur
S BournonitePbCuSbS3
S BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
S LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
S AnglesitePbSO4
S Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
S CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
S GalenaPbS
S GreenockiteCdS
S LeadhillitePb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
S TetradymiteBi2Te2S
S AcanthiteAg2S
S ChalcociteCu2S
S CovelliteCuS
S JamesonitePb4FeSb6S14
S PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
S ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
S SphaleriteZnS
S TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
S BaryteBaSO4
S Galena (var: Argentiferous Galena)PbS
S PyriteFeS2
S GeocronitePb14(Sb,As)6S23
ClChlorine
Cl PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
Cl ChlorargyriteAgCl
CaCalcium
Ca CalciteCaCO3
FeIron
Fe Goethiteα-Fe3+O(OH)
Fe JamesonitePb4FeSb6S14
Fe PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
Fe ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Fe TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Fe PyriteFeS2
Fe Limonite(Fe,O,OH,H2O)
Fe SideriteFeCO3
CuCopper
Cu BournonitePbCuSbS3
Cu BrochantiteCu4(SO4)(OH)6
Cu LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Cu Rosasite(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Cu Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Cu CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
Cu MalachiteCu2(CO3)(OH)2
Cu AzuriteCu3(CO3)2(OH)2
Cu ChalcociteCu2S
Cu CovelliteCuS
Cu TenoriteCuO
Cu ChalcopyriteCuFeS2
Cu ChrysocollaCu2-xAlx(H2-xSi2O5)(OH)4 · nH2O
Cu TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Cu CopperCu
Cu LiroconiteCu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
Cu MixiteBiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
Cu CupriteCu2O
ZnZinc
Zn Rosasite(Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2
Zn SmithsoniteZnCO3
Zn Aurichalcite(Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6
Zn HemimorphiteZn4Si2O7(OH)2 · H2O
Zn WillemiteZn2SiO4
Zn HydrozinciteZn5(CO3)2(OH)6
Zn SphaleriteZnS
Zn TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
AsArsenic
As Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
As GeocronitePb14(Sb,As)6S23
As LiroconiteCu2Al(AsO4)(OH)4 · 4H2O
As MixiteBiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O
MoMolybdenum
Mo WulfenitePb(MoO4)
AgSilver
Ag Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Ag AcanthiteAg2S
Ag ChlorargyriteAgCl
Ag SilverAg
CdCadmium
Cd GreenockiteCdS
SbAntimony
Sb BournonitePbCuSbS3
Sb Polybasite[(Ag,Cu)6(Sb,As)2S7][Ag9CuS4]
Sb BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
Sb JamesonitePb4FeSb6S14
Sb TetrahedriteCu6Cu4(Fe2+,Zn)2Sb4S12S
Sb GeocronitePb14(Sb,As)6S23
TeTellurium
Te TetradymiteBi2Te2S
BaBarium
Ba BaryteBaSO4
AuGold
Au GoldAu
PbLead
Pb BournonitePbCuSbS3
Pb CerussitePbCO3
Pb LinaritePbCu(SO4)(OH)2
Pb WulfenitePb(MoO4)
Pb AnglesitePbSO4
Pb CaledonitePb5Cu2(SO4)3(CO3)(OH)6
Pb BindheimitePb2Sb2O6O
Pb GalenaPbS
Pb LeadhillitePb4(CO3)2(SO4)(OH)2
Pb PyromorphitePb5(PO4)3Cl
Pb JamesonitePb4FeSb6S14
Pb MiniumPb3O4
Pb PlumbojarositePb0.5Fe33+(SO4)2(OH)6
Pb Galena (var: Argentiferous Galena)PbS
Pb GeocronitePb14(Sb,As)6S23
Pb PlumbogummitePbAl3(PO4)(PO3OH)(OH)6
BiBismuth
Bi TetradymiteBi2Te2S
Bi MixiteBiCu6(AsO4)3(OH)6 · 3H2O

References

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Year (asc) Year (desc) Author (A-Z) Author (Z-A)
Greene, Linda I. (1981), U.S. National Park Service, Historic Preservation Branch, Pacific Northwest/Western Team, Denver Service Center, Death Valley – Historic Resource Study – A History of Mining, Volume I, part 1: IIB, 1 & 2.

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